English

General Notes on Courses

Courses whose numbers begin with the digits 3 and 4 are normally open only to students in their third and fourth years. Courses whose numbers begin with the digit 5 are normally open only to students in Honours.

Each spring the Department compiles a Handbook with detailed descriptions of courses to be offered in the following academic year. For information about instructors, texts, assignments, and examinations required etc., you should consult this Handbook, available from the Department office and online at the English Department website. For further information, consult the instructors.

Other Literatures: Consult the course listings for Classics, French, Greek, and Latin, and for Comparative Cultural Studies.

English as a Second Language: Consult the course listings for AESL (Academic ESL).

Drama program: Consult the course listings for DRAM.

Film program: Consult the course listings for FILM.

NOTE: See the beginning of Section H for abbreviations, course numbers, and coding.

ENGL1000Introduction to Modern Literature in English6 ch (3C) [W]

This course introduces students to a diverse range of literary works written in English, primarily from the twentieth and twenty-first centuries, including short stories, poems, plays, and novels. These works demonstrate how literature can open up new understandings about societies and histories both within and beyond our local experience. The selection of texts varies from section to section, but all sections devote one-third of class time to developing writing skills, and the course places considerable emphasis on critical reading. ENGL 1000 welcomes all students with an interest in English, and it is normally required for the English Major and Honours programs.

ENGL1103Fundamentals of Clear Writing3 ch (3C) [W]

A study of the basic principles of clear prose writing, focusing on essay structure and organization, paragraph structure, sentence structure, grammar, punctuation, and word choice, as well as revising and proofreading. Students will submit numerous written assignments.

ENGL1104Fundamentals of Effective Writing3 ch (3C) [W]

A further examination of the basic principles of prose writing, with special attention to larger patterns of organization and development used in prose exposition and argument. 

Prerequisites: A grade of C or better in ENGL 1103, or equivalent. 

ENGL1144Reading and Writing Non-Fiction Prose3 ch (2C 1T) [W]

By studying non-fiction prose models and by writing essays, students will work to improve their writing, explore techniques to craft effective essays, and develop critical and analytical skills applicable to a wide range of disciplines. Tutorials use exercises and discussions to assist this development.

ENGL1145An Introduction to Prose Fiction3 ch (2C 1T) [W]

Two weekly lectures examine a variety of short stories (and perhaps one or two novels) from the nineteenth, twentieth, and twenty-first centuries. Weekly small tutorials teach critical and writing skills (such as grammar, punctuation, organization, and argumentation) applied to the course readings.

ENGL1146An Introduction to the Novel (O)3 ch (2C 1T) [W]

Examines a brief range of novels from the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. 

ENGL1173Introduction to Acting and Performance (Cross-Listed: DRAM 1173)3 ch (3 hours/wk plus practical work)

An introduction to acting suitable for students at all skill levels, from beginners to experienced performers. Instruction will cover the basics of voice, movement, improvisation, script analysis, and monologue and scene work, culminating in a final performance project.

NOTE: Students can obtain credit for only one of ENGL 1173 and DRAM 1173.

ENGL2011English Literature to 1660 3 ch (3C) [W]

This course traces the beginnings of English literature to 1660, with a focus on love and sexuality, cultural and linguistic upheavals, religion and secularism, and the impact of imperialism. While society was structured by powerful ideas of order grounded in religion, nature, social rank, gender, ethnicity, and race, traditional thinking about these concepts was increasingly challenged, not least by contact with non-European cultures and the Scientific Revolution. As literacy rates rose, English literature found new audiences, producing richly varied and often playful works. Works by figures such as Chaucer, Shakespeare, and Milton are central to the course, but other texts will also be discussed. Genres include poetry, drama, and prose. This course is required for the English Major and Honours programs, and strongly recommended for Minors. NOTE: Students can obtain credit for only one of ENGL 2011 and ENGL 2901.

Prerequisite: A grade of C or better in ENGL 1000 or equivalent, or permission of the instructor. 

ENGL2012English Literature 1660-19003 ch (3C) [W]

This course picks up the story from ENGL 2011. In these centuries, trade, industrialization, wars, and Britain's rise as an imperial power helped to spark social conflicts centring on class, race, indigeneity, gender, sexuality, politics, and religion. New genres (such as the novel) emerged and others (such as poetry) transformed; the accelerating rise in literacy rates created new audiences for literature and also meant that people from an ever-broader range of social backgrounds were writing. Poetry and prose are the major genres here. This course is required for the English Major and Honours programs, and strongly recommended for Minors. NOTE: Students can obtain credit for only one of ENGL 2012 and ENGL 2902.

Prerequisite: A grade of C or better in ENGL 1000 or equivalent, or permission of the instructor.

ENGL2173Acting: Body and Text (Cross-Listed: DRAM 2173)3 ch (3 hours/wk plus practical work)

A course suitable for both beginner and experienced actors, with a focus on voice, movement, and script analysis, culminating in the presentation of a scene study or one-act play. Rehearsal and performance time additional to regular class hours required.

NOTE: Students can obtain credit for only one of ENGL 2173 and DRAM 2173.

ENGL2174Technical Production and Design for the Theatre (Cross-Listed: DRAM 2174)3 ch (3 hours/wk plus practical work)
An introduction to set construction, lighting, sound, and stage management for the theatre, with instruction in basic principles of set, sound, and lighting design. As part of their work for the course, students will assist with carpentry and design work for one or more Theatre UNB mainstage productions and act as crew members for productions. Workshop and performance time additional to regular class hours required. NOTE: Students can obtain credit for only one of ENGL 2174 and DRAM 2174.
ENGL2175Mainstage Production I (Cross-Listed: DRAM 2175)3 ch (3 hours/wk plus practical work)

Participants in this course form a theatre company and produce, rehearse, and perform a mainstage production for the Theatre UNB season, under the direction of the instructor. Rehearsal and performance time additional to regular class hours required. NOTE: Students can obtain credit for only one of ENGL 2175 and DRAM 2175.

Prerequisite: Students must have either completed or be concurrently enrolled in ENGL 1173, DRAM 1173, ENGL 2173, or DRAM 2173.

ENGL2195Introduction to Creative Writing: Poetry and Drama3 ch (3C/WS) [W] (LE)

Introduction to the writing of poetry and drama, with a focus on basic technique, style, and form. Combines writing exercises and lectures on the elements of writing, but also introduces the workshop method, by which students provide critiques of each other’s work and develop editorial skills. May include assigned readings.

ENGL2196Introduction to Creative Writing: Fiction and Screenwriting3 ch (3C/WS) [W] (LE)

Introduction to the writing of fiction and to screenwriting, with a focus on basic narrative technique, style, and form. Combines writing exercises and lectures on the elements of writing, but also introduces the workshop method, by which students provide critiques of each other’s work and develop editorial skills. May include assigned readings. 

ENGL2197Travel Writing (O)3 ch (3C) [W]

This course introduces students to contemporary travel-writing narratives, both long and short, written by a diversity of notable contributors to the genre. The course examines relevant themes of travel narratives as well as structural techniques that shape the genre. The course also invites students to use this knowledge to write their own travel sketches based on experiences of travelling in Canada or abroad, combined with appropriate contextual research. The course evaluation is based on both critical essays and creative writing assignments.

ENGL2263Shakespeare and Film (O)3 ch (3C) [W]

Film directors have transformed Shakespeare into one of today's hottest cultural properties, rekindling a profitable relationship with the world's greatest playwright that dates back to the first days of late-nineteenth-century cinema. The screen has now overtaken both the written text and the stage as the medium in which most people discover and appreciate Shakespeare. In this course we shall study some examples of this flourishing exchange between Shakespeare and film in terms of artistic expression and social practice. Required readings will include single-volume editions of the plays; a film studies handbook; and screenings of the films (at least two versions of each play).

ENGL2603Literature of Atlantic Canada (O)3 ch (3C) [W]

An exploration of poetry, fiction, drama, and/or film, written by Atlantic Canadians, that emphasizes the prevalent themes explored by Maritime and Newfoundland authors, such as the search for personal and regional identity, human relations to landscape and the natural world, and the meaning of “home place.” Authors may include Alden Nowlan, Milton Acorn, Rita Joe, David Adams Richards, John Steffler, Mary Dalton, Anne Compton, Wayne Johnston, Lisa Moore, Anne Simpson, George Elliott Clarke, Sue Goyette, Michael Crummey, El Jones, and Nolan Natasha.

ENGL2605Introduction to Indigenous Literatures of the Wabanaki Confederacy/Atlantic Region3 ch (3C) [W]
An introduction to historical and contemporary Indigenous literatures and cultures of the five nations (Mi'kmaq, Wolastoqey, Passamaquoddy, Abenaki, and Penobscot) that comprise the Wabanaki Confederacy, straddling the Canada-US border in the Atlantic region. Authors may include Gabriel Acquin (Wolastoqey), Mihku Paul (Wolastoqey), Lorne Simon (Mi'kmaq), Peter Clair (Mi'kmaq), Shirley Bear (Wolastoqey), Molly Spotted Elk (Penobscot), Douglas Walbourne-Gough (Qualipu Mi'kmaq), and Cheryl Savageau (Abenaki).
ENGL2608Introduction to Contemporary Canadian Literature (O)3 ch (3C) [W]

A survey of English-Canadian fiction, non-fiction prose, poetry, drama, and/or film that explores major themes in contemporary Canadian literature, such as the shaping of Canadian identity, regionalism and the global perspective, class divides, ecocritical views, and other current issues. Authors may include Dionne Brand, Tomson Highway, Lynn Coady, Don McKay, Eden Robinson, Katherena Vermette, and Joshua Whitehead.

ENGL2703Introduction to Modern American Literature (O)3 ch (3C) [W]

An exploration of selected topics in American literature and culture. The theme of the course changes each year. In each course, students read selected works of poetry, fiction, creative non-fiction, and/or drama and may also explore the relationship between U.S. literature and other media such as film and television. Possible themes include the American West, multi-ethnic literature, U.S. presidential elections, the Beat Generation, and Hollywood fictions. Please see the Department of English Handbook or website for the current description.

ENGL2903Current Issues in Literature (O)3 ch (3C) [W]
How does literature engage with the world's urgent problems? How does literature reflect or even challenge reality? This course narrows its focus to key concepts, themes, and issues with which literature across different traditions in English wrestles. The course will address one or two key concepts and themes, such as alientation, climate crises, "progress," race, empire, sexuality, politics, and animals. Texts may be drawn from historical and contemporary periods and may include a range of popular genres such as sci-fi, utopian/dystopian fiction, Gothic fiction, film, video, comics, and graphic novels. 
ENGL2909International Film History (Cross-Listed: FILM 2909)3 ch (3C) [W]

This course introduces students to major stages in the development of film as an international art. Topics include Silent Cinema, German Expressionism, Soviet Montage, Classical Hollywood, Italian Neorealism and Modernism, French New Wave, Japanese New Wave, British New Wave, Australian New Wave, Experimental Cinema, Cinema Novo, New German Cinema, Postcolonial Cinema, Bollywood, the New Hollywood, American Independent Cinema, Dogme 95, and others. NOTE: Students can obtain credit for only one of ENGL 2909 and FILM 2909

ENGL2984Introduction to Speculative Literature (O)3 ch (3C) [W]
An introduction to speculative literature, including science fiction, fantasy, and horror. The course focuses on novels and short fiction but may also touch on drama, film, and television. 
ENGL2987Introduction to Queer Literatures (O)3 ch (3C) [W]
Covering a range of historical and contemporary queer, two-spirit, and transgender authors, this course queers the field of English literature by exploring texts across multiple genres through the lens of queer theory. As part of challenging the heteronormativity of the English literary canon and its reception, we will include canonical authors who are seldom read as part of a broader queer history. Topics may include HIV/AIDS, racialization and gender, transgender, body modification, mental health, drag, the closet, shame, pride, rights, and families.
ENGL3040Medieval Literature (O)6 ch (3C) [W]

Examines a wide variety of medieval literature from the British Isles, including courtly romances and dream visions, bawdy fabliaux, alliterative heroic verse, lyric poetry, verse satire, and drama. Also explores the historical context of the individual works: the politics and shifting social structures of this period, the intellectual and cultural environment, and the ways in which the works respond to the international political, religious, and military conflicts of the age and to contact with non-European cultures. 

ENGL3083Literary Theory and Critical Practice 3 ch (3C) [W]

A study of the development of literary theory and criticism, with some attention to critical practice. The course covers major approaches to literary interpretation, such as deconstruction, gender studies, Marxism, new historicism, postcolonial studies, and psychoanalysis. Readings will include excerpts from theorists such as Jacques Derrida, Michel Foucault, Julia Kristeva, Judith Butler, and Homi Bhabha. NOTE: Students cannot obtain credit for both ENGL 3083 and ENGL 5083.

ENGL3103Creative Writing: Studio Course (O)3 ch (3WS) [W]

A studio course offers students the opportunity to work on an independent creative writing project supervised by a faculty member of the English Department or by a person approved by the Director of Creative Writing and the Chair of the Department. Students wishing to take a studio course must find a faculty member willing to supervise the project. The project may explore a single genre in depth or may be a multi-genre work. Readings will typically be assigned in addition to the writing done for the course. Students will meet regularly with the supervisor in editorial sessions to discuss the writing in detail and to discuss assigned readings. The course must not include writing done for another course or workshop.

ENGL3123Creative Writing: Poetry3 ch (3WS) [W]

A creative writing course aimed at developing skills in the writing of poetry. Students will participate in workshops and discussions and will complete assigned readings and exercises as they explore the poetic possibilities of language.

ENGL3143Creative Writing: Short Fiction3 ch (3WS) [W]

A creative writing course aimed at developing skills in the writing of short fiction. Students will participate in workshops and discussions and will complete assigned readings and exercises as they delve into the craft of storytelling.

ENGL3153Creative Writing: Non-Fiction (O)3 ch (3WS) [W]

A creative writing course aimed at developing skills in the writing of non-fiction. It involves prescribed readings, exercises, workshops, and discussions.

ENGL3163Creative Writing: Drama (O)3 ch (3WS) [W]

Taught in a workshop format, this course is designed to advance students' skills in the writing of stage plays. Students will learn through readings, presentations, and exercises, and submit work regularly for class discussion. 

ENGL3170Advanced Drama Production (Cross-Listed: DRAM 3170)6 ch (3 hours/wk plus practical work)

A project-based course that builds on ENGL 2173/DRAM 2173 and ENGL 2174/DRAM 2174 by offering advanced training in acting, directing, and design for the theatre. Instruction centres on 1-2 full-scale theatre productions mounted by the class for Theatre UNB. Rehearsal, workshop, and performance time additional to regular class hours required.

NOTE: Students can obtain credit for only one of ENGL 3170 and DRAM 3170.

Prerequisites: ENGL 2173 (or DRAM 2173and ENGL 2174 (or DRAM 2174), or equivalent.

ENGL3175Mainstage Production II (Cross-Listed DRAM 3175)3 ch (3 hours/wk plus practical work)

Building on the skills developed in ENGL 2175/DRAM 2175, participants in this course form a theatre company and produce, rehearse, and perform a mainstage production for the Theatre UNB season, under the direction of the instructor. Rehearsal and performance time additional to regular class hours required. Permission of the instructor is required.

NOTE: Students can obtain credit for only one of ENGL 3175 and DRAM 3175.

Prerequisite: ENGL 2175 (or DRAM 2175) or both ENGL 2173 (or DRAM 2173) and ENGL 2174 (or DRAM 2174).

ENGL3183Creative Writing: Screenwriting for Short Formats (Cross-Listed: FILM 3183)3 ch (3WS)[W](LE)

This course guides writers through the basics of short format screenplay structures and introduces them to basic story, character, and dialogue principles.  Students will be exposed to a wide range of short films in a variety of genres and forms so that they can explore the limits and possibilities of briefer forms of cinematic storytelling.

NOTE: Students can obtain credit for only one of ENGL 3183 and FILM 3183.

ENGL3186Creative Writing: Feature Screenplay (Cross-Listed: FILM 3186)3 ch (3WS)[W](LE)

This intensive course guides writers through the basics of feature screenplay structure, character principles, archetypal storytelling, writing and rewriting strategies, and ‘the biz.’ Classes are a combination of lectures, discussion, and workshops. NOTE: Students can obtain credit for only one of ENGL 3186 and FILM 3186.

Prerequisite: ENGL 3183 or FILM 3183 or equivalent writing experience, with permission of the instructor.
ENGL3260Shakespeare6 ch (3C) [W]

A study of selected plays. 

ENGL3263Shakespeare's Predecessors and Contemporaries (A)3 ch (3C) [W]

A study of English medieval and Renaissance drama, excluding Shakespeare. 

ENGL3269Shakespeare Now (O)3 ch (3C) [W]
After we read Facebook and Twitter to find out what's happening, we turn to Shakespeare to make sense of it. This course looks at urgent twenty-first-century issues interpreted through Shakespeare's plays and related contemporary criticism and performances. Such issues might include political tyranny, war, trauma, race, sexual harassment, gender, queerness, disability, body-type discrimination, colonialism, environmentalism, and animal-human relations. NOTE: Students cannot obtain credit for both ENGL 3260 and ENGL 3269.
ENGL3283Early Renaissance Poetry and Prose (A)3 ch (3C) [W]

Examines a wide variety of sixteenth-century poetry and prose, including sonnets and other lyric poetry, allegorical epic, early prose fiction, statements on literary theory, and contemporaneous commentary on political events, as well as early translations of a few major works of the European Renaissance. Also explores the historical and intellectual contexts of the works, and the politics and social structures of this age of exploration and experimentation.

ENGL3284Poetry and Prose of the Later Renaissance (including Milton) (A)3 ch (3C) [W]

Examines a wide variety of non-dramatic poetry and prose from the end of the reign of Elizabeth I to just after the Restoration (1660). The course explores the poetry of Donne and the Metaphysical poets, Jonson and the Cavalier poets, Marvell, and the gradually more numerous women writers; it also examines the new forms of prose and includes a selection of Milton's works.

ENGL3343The British Novel I (A)3 ch (3C) [W]

Among the major events of the long eighteenth century was the invention of the English novel. This course tracks the early development of the novel, from the beginnings to the early nineteenth century, and may include such authors as Behn, Defoe, Richardson, Burney, Henry and Sarah Fielding, Walpole, Godwin, Wollstonecraft, and Austen. Some attention will be paid to the social contexts of the emerging genre and to its roots in such forms as the letter, the newspaper, and broadsheet criminal biography.

ENGL3385The Long Eighteenth Century (A)3 ch (3C) [W]

Focuses on poetry and prose from the long eighteenth century (c.1660-1790). Considers how British literature develops during this time in relation to its rapidly changing socio-political, economic, and technological environments. Authors may include Dryden, Equiano, Finch, Gray, Johnson, Leapor, Milton, Lady Wortley Montagu, Pope, and Swift. May take an eco-critical approach or investigate literature's investments in colonial and anti-colonial perspectives. 

ENGL3400The Romantic Period (A)6 ch (3C) [W]

Examines the major works of British literature in the Romantic period (c.1789-1832). Focuses on the poetry and prose of Barbauld, Wollstonecraft, Blake, Wordsworth, Coleridge, Byron, Mary and Percy Shelley, and Keats. Considers the context of the tremendous social, economic, political, scientific, and cultural events of the period, including the American and French revolutions, the industrial revolution, educational reform, and the rising tides of early feminism, abolitionism, and animal rights. NOTE: Students can obtain credit for only one of ENGL 3400 and ENGL 3406.

ENGL3406The Romantic Period (O)3 ch (3C) [W]

Examines brief selections of the major works of British literature in the Romantic period (c.1789-1832), with special emphasis on the poetry and prose of Barbaud, Blake, Wordsworth, Coleridge, Byron, the Shelleys, and Keats. Considers the context of the tremendous social, economic, political, scientific, and cultural events of the period, including the American and French revolutions, the industrial revolution, educational reform, and the rising tides of early feminism, abolitionism, and animal rights.  NOTE: Students can obtain credit for only one of ENGL 3406 and ENGL 3400

ENGL3410Victorian Literature (A)6 ch (3C) [W]

Examines British literature from the Victorian Age (c.1830-1901). This was a time of great transition. Many writers, starting in the 1830s, felt a new sense of modernity, a new historical self-consciousness, and pressing moral purpose. Includes poetry, non-fiction prose (essays, scientific texts), and fiction by major and minor writers from Arnold to Wilde. Key topics include changing landscapes, visions of time, sexuality, and the co-evolution of literature and science. NOTE: Students can obtain credit for only one of ENGL 3416 and ENGL 3410.

ENGL3416Victorian Literature (O)3 ch (3C) [W]

Examines British literature from the Victorian Age (c.1830-1901). This was a time of great transition. Many writers, starting in the 1830s, felt a new sense of modernity, a new historical self-consciousness, and pressing moral purpose. Features a brief selection of poems, essays, scientific texts, and short fiction by major writers such as Arnold, Barrett Browning, Browning, Dickens, Darwin, Dante Gabriel and Christina Rossetti, Ruskin, Tennyson, and Wilde. NOTE: Students can obtain credit for only one of ENGL 3410 and ENGL 3416. 

ENGL3443The British Novel II (A)3 ch (3C) [W]

Examines the meteoric rise of the novel throughout the long nineteenth century with a focus on major Victorian novelists (such as the Brontë sisters, Dickens, Eliot, and Hardy). Key ideas here include serialization, realism, increased literacy rates, the rising middle class, the "New Woman," and the Gothic.

ENGL3535Modern British Poetry (A)3 ch (3C) [W]

This course explores a variety of British poems from the twentieth and twenty-first centuries, including examples of traditional artistic concerns, technical innovations, war protest, social criticism, whimsy, emotional turmoil, and political commentary. The primary focus is on the detailed examination of a small number of selected works.

ENGL3540The Modern British Novel (A)6 ch (3C) [W]

This exploration of ten British novels from the twentieth and twenty-first centuries reveals the period’s wide range of both social concerns and literary techniques. The varied selection of the course offers intriguing stories that display the complexities of human relationships and social conventions as well as the possibilities of technical experimentation. A sense of the overall development of the modern novel is provided by the inclusion of both early representatives and novels published within the last few years.

ENGL3605Indigenous Literatures of Turtle Island: A Historical Survey to the Present3 ch (3C) [W]
A survey of Indigenous literatures across Turtle Island from before colonization to the present day, with an emphasis on historical contexts and literary developments in a variety of genres (including objects such as wampum belts and pictographs). Topics to be explored include colonial relations in pre-Confederation Canada and the US, the Trail of Tears, residential schooling, Indigenous migration and urbanization, the Sixties Scoop, the Occupation of Alcatraz, and the Truth and Reconciliation Commission. The course considers how Indigenous literatures have raised and addressed these issues over the past five hundred years. Authors may include Joseph Brant (Mohawk), E. Pauline Johnson (Mohawk), George Copway (Mississauga Ojibwe), Basil Johnston (Ojibwe Anishnaabe), Maria Campbell (Métis), Lee Maracle (Métis/Salish), Handsome Lake (Seneca), Samson Occom (Mohegan), John Ross (Cherokee), William Apess (Pequot), Alexander Lawrence Posey (Creek), Sarah Winnemucca (Paiute), Zitkála-Šá (Sioux), Mourning Dove (Okanogan), N. Scott Momaday (Kiowa), Joy Harjo (Muscogee), Louise Erdrich (Anishnaabe), and Alicia Elliott (Tuscarora).
ENGL3606Indigenous Literatures since 19703 ch (3C) [W]
This course explores key thematic and formal developments in the Indigenous literatures of Turtle Island from 1970 to the present, with a focus on texts that probe the impact of key political and cultural events on Indigenous peoples and their communities on both sides of the Canada-US border including the Oka Crisis, the Truth and Reconciliation Commission, Idle No More, the Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls Inquiry, the founding of the American Indian Movement, the Occupation of Wounded Knee, the first Two-Spirit Gathering in Minneapolis, the Native American Apology Resolution, and the Dakota Pipeline Access protests. Authors may include Louise Halfe (Cree), Leslie Marmon Silko (Laguna Pueblo), Armand Garnet Ruffo (Ojibwe Anishnaabe), Gregory Scofield (Métis), Marie Clements (Métis), Diane Glancy (Cherokee), Chrystos (Menominee), Eden Robinson (Haisla/Heiltsuk), Katherena Vermette (Métis), Tanya Tagaq (Inuit), Harold Cardinal (Cree), Gerald Vizenor (White Earth Ojibwe), James Welch (Blackfeet Gros-Ventre), Simon Ortiz (Acoma Pueblo), Thomas King (Cherokee), Liz Howard (Ojibwe Anishnaabe), Jordan Abel (Nisga'a), Tommy Orange (Cheyenne/Arapaho), and Billy-Ray Belcourt (Cree).
ENGL3608Canadian Literature to 1900 (A)3 ch (3C) [W]

A survey of Canadian non-fiction prose, poetry, fiction, drama, and/or film from early narratives of encounter to 1900, examining key cultural and historical moments in the development of Canada as a nation. Authors may include Jacques Cartier, Samuel de Champlain, Joseph Brant, Oliver Goldsmith, Susanna Moodie, Anna Brownell Jameson, Catherine Parr Traill, George Copway, Mary Ann Shadd, Louis Riel, E. Pauline Johnson, Charles G.D. Roberts, Sara Jeannette Duncan, Bliss Carman, and Archibald Lampman. 

ENGL3688Canadian Literature 1900-1970 (A)3 ch (3C) [W]

A survey of English-Canadian prose, poetry, drama, and/or film from the turn of the century to 1970, with a focus on the development of realism and modernism in Canada. Authors may include Jessie Sime, Stephen Leacock, L.M. Montgomery, Robert Service, Frederick Philip Grove, E.J. Pratt, F.R. Scott, A.M. Klein, Dorothy Livesay, P.K. Page, Sinclair Ross, Sheila Watson, Elizabeth Smart, Al Purdy, and Chief Dan George. 

ENGL3698Canadian Literature since 1970 (A) 3 ch (3C) [W]

A survey of English-Canadian poetry, prose, drama, and/or film from 1970 to the present. Authors may include Michael Ondaatje, Robert Kroetsch, Alice Munro, Maria Campbell, Rohinton Mistry, M. NourbeSe Philip, Thomas King, Miriam Toews, Kai Cheng Thom, and Liz Howard. 

ENGL3707American Literature before 1820 (A)3 ch (3C) [W]

A survey of American poetry and prose from colonial times to the early nineteenth century, examining key cultural and historical moments in the development of the United States as a nation. Texts will include contact narratives, Puritan poetry and memoirs, revolutionary-era fiction and plays, and the earliest published work by Native- and African-American writers. 

ENGL3708American Literature 1820-1900 (A) 3 ch (3C) [W]

A survey of nineteenth-century American fiction, poetry, and non-fiction prose ranging from the American Renaissance to the Realist and Naturalist period. Authors may include Ralph Waldo Emerson, Henry David Thoreau, Edgar Allan Poe, Herman Melville, Nathaniel Hawthorne, Emily Dickinson, Walt Whitman, Frederick Douglass, Harriet Jacobs, Rebecca Harding Davis, Louisa May Alcott, Mark Twain, Edith Wharton, and others. 

ENGL3788American Modernism (A)3 ch (3C) [W]

A close study of selected works of American modernism published in the first half of the twentieth century, including poetry and fiction. The course covers different varieties of modernism, such as expatriate writing, the Harlem Renaissance, and proletarian literature. Authors discussed may include Cather,  H.D., Eliot, Faulkner, Fitzgerald, Frost, Hemingway, Hughes, Hurston, Larsen, Moore, Pound, Rukeyser, Stein, Stevens, Williams, Wright, and others.

ENGL3798American Literature since 1945 (A)3 ch (3C) [W]
A close study of selected works of American literature published from World War II to the present. The course touches on a wide variety of literary movements such as postmodernism, confessional literature, multi-racial and ethnic literature, eco-critical literature, and language poetry. Authors discussed may include Ralph Ellison, Allen Ginsberg, Sylvia Plath, Adrienne Rich, Thomas Pynchon, Toni Morrison, Maxine Hong Kingston, John Ashbery, Don DeLillo, Louise Erdrich, and many others.
ENGL3813Literatures of Africa, the Caribbean, and South Asia (A)3 ch (3C) [W]
A survey of twentieth- and twenty-first-century writing in English from Africa, the Caribbean, and South Asia, with an emphasis on fiction. Literature studied exemplifies themes characteristic of former colonies of invasion (e.g., the history and legacy of colonization; racial consciousness and conflict; language, identity, and difference; place, displacement, and diaspora; nationalism and globalization). Texts are discussed in their historical, cultural, and socio-political contexts, and students are introduced to some relevant theoretical concepts.
ENGL3814Literatures of Australia, New Zealand, and South Africa (A)3 ch (3C) [W]
A survey of twentieth- and twenty-first-century writing in English from Australia, New Zealand, and South Africa, with an emphasis on fiction. Literature studied exemplifies themes characteristic of former invader-settler colonies (e.g., land and landscape; home and belonging; relations between settler populations and indigenous peoples; pluralism and multiculturalism; national identity and globalization). Texts are discussed in their historical, cultural, and socio-political contexts, and students are introduced to some relevant theoretical concepts.
ENGL3877Modern Drama (A)3 ch (3C) [W]

A survey of major developments in twentieth-century theatre. Plays will be studied with attention to their often controversial engagements with social and political issues, moral debates, and theatrical conventions, as well as their connections to movements such as realism, modernism, expressionism, and absurdism.

ENGL3883Women's Writing in English (A)3 ch (3C) [W]

A study of women's writing in English from a range of historical periods. Texts will vary from year to year, but will include poetry, drama, fiction, and/or non-fiction written primarily by British, American, and Canadian women. Attention will also be paid to relationships between women's writing and history, contemporary feminist and gender theory, and social issues such as identity, sexuality, class, and race. 

ENGL3903Film Theory (Cross-Listed: FILM 3903)3 ch (3C) [W]

This course introduces students to the major debates in the field of film theory, including (but not limited to) Early Silent Film Theory, the Soviet Montage-Theorists, Russian Formalism and the Bakhtin School, the Historical Avant-gardes, French Auteur Theory and its Americanization, Third World Film and Theory, Genre and Authorship, Marxist film theory, Spectatorship, Feminist Film Theory, Cognitive and Analytic Theory, Postcolonial Film Theory, and Race and Ethnicity in Cinema. NOTE: Students can obtain credit for only one of ENGL 3903 and  FILM 3903

ENGL3907Film Genre (O) (Cross-Listed: FILM 3907)3 ch (3C) [W]

The Film Genre course explores the history, iconography, and socio-cultural significance of one particular film genre by means of a number of examples. The specific focus of the course varies from year to year. 

NOTE: Students can obtain credit for only one of ENGL 3907 and FILM 3907.

ENGL3908Zombies in Film (O) (Cross-Listed: FILM 3908) 3 ch (3C) [W]

Zombie films make up one of the longest living sub-genres of horror though representations of zombies have evolved from exoticized monstrous figures from Haiti to cannibalistic brain eaters and eventually to infectious bodies carrying epidemics. This course explores the evolution of zombies from studio pictures starring Bela Lugosi to B-movies featuring fighting ninjas and murdering cheerleaders through to modern film zombies who look uncannily like the unconscious bored populace and/or become loving family pets. Zombies are never simply undead; they always reflect something about our changing lives and fears. These films also permit us to explore the murky spaces between high and low culture, the history and development of horror films as a genre, and the aesthetics of fear. NOTE: Students can obtain credit for only one of ENGL 3908 and FILM 3908.

ENGL3916Canadian Film since 1967 (O) (Cross-Listed: FILM 3916)3 ch (3C) [W]

Through the study of various representative Canadian filmmakers and prevalent genres, this course explores the roles that regionalism, commercialism, and independent filmmaking play in defining national ideas about Canadian cinema and film audiences. This course concurrently traces developments in Canadian film production, policy, funding, distribution, and use since the creation of Telefilm (formerly the CFDC) and how these funding and cultural policies have affected and responded to the central themes and issues facing Canadian filmmakers and audiences. NOTE: Students can obtain credit for only one of ENGL 3966, ENGL 3916, and FILM 3916.

ENGL3917National Cinemas (O) (Cross-Listed: FILM 3917) 3 ch (3C) [W]

The National Cinemas course explores significant historical periods, movements, styles, film theories, directors, and topics in the development of particular national and/or transnational cinemas. The specific focus of the course varies from year to year.

ENGL3918The French New Wave (O) (Cross-Listed: FILM 3918)3 ch (3C) [W]

One of the most exciting movements in cinema, the French New Wave radically altered film, influencing and informing new kinds of cinema around the world and changing how we talk about and study films. The films of filmmakers like François Truffaut, Claude Chabrol, and Jean-Luc Godard continue to inspire contemporary filmmakers and critics. Through watching and analyzing their first films, reading their writings in Cahiers du Cinéma, and exploring how film historians interpret this period now, we will attempt to understand the artistic, social, economic, and historical forces that shaped the film movement and filmmaking in the decades to follow.

NOTE: Students can obtain credit for only one of ENGL 3918 and FILM 3918.

ENGL3978Monsters and the Grotesque in Literature (O)3 ch (3C) [W]
This course explores images of monsters, monstrosity, and the grotesque in literary texts from various periods. It proceeds from the premise that monsters and grotesque bodies offer radical images of the "other" and that our fascination with these assemblages of familiar parts into unfamiliar wholes speaks to human anxieties and confusions regarding identity, boundaries, security, and sexuality. Discover how the at-once attractive and repulsive images of monstrosity and the grotesque playfully "embody" the ambivalence of the cultures that produce them. Using insights drawn from various cultural and intellectual traditions, we consider how literature employs monstrous and grotesque images to imaginatively address human problems.
ENGL3983Literature and the Environment (O) 3 ch (3C) [W]
Reading a diverse array of ecologically oriented poetry, fiction, non-fiction, and theory, students will examine how literary forms engage non-human life. Possible areas of focus include human-animal encounters, Indigenous ways of knowing, river literature, ocean literature, the energy humanities, posthumanism, race and environment, eco-poetics, eco-film, visual art, and activist literature. Students are invited to engage creatively with their literary and lived environments through written assignments, in-class discussion, and forays into the great wild world around us.
ENGL3985The Body in Literature (O)3 ch (3C) [W]
Many visceral notions — that is, ideas about bodies — may seem new to us; transgender, mental health, feminism, anti-racism, and bioethical concerns come to mind. Yet literary texts from a variety of periods anticipate many of these fields and often do so with scant attention to social acceptability. This course focuses on bodily matters as they appear in poetry, drama, and prose: desire, illness, technology, emotion, gender, race, species, suffering, aging, pleasure, etc.
ENGL3987Fashioning the Nation (O)3 ch (3C) [W]
This course explores the recent significance of television, its impact on the fashion industry, and the ways in which television itself has become part of the business of the creation, marketing, and consumption of fashion, from haute couture to mass market brands. In particular, the course considers the implications of the coupling of fashion and television for contemporary definitions of citizenship. Texts range from novels and children's books to episodes of Sex and the City, What Not to Wear (British and US versions), Mad Men, Fashion Police, House of Cards, and Project Runway.
ENGL4170Thesis Production and Independent Project (Cross-Listed: DRAM 4170)6 ch (practical work)

Open to students completing the final year of a Double Major or Minor in Drama. Working in groups, students produce a full-scale production for Theatre UNB. The second requirement for the course is to complete an independent project designed to further students’ knowledge of a theatre discipline of their choice. Both halves of the course are completed under the supervision of the Director of Drama. 

NOTE: Students can take no more than 6 ch of ENGL 4170 (or DRAM 4170), ENGL 4173 (or DRAM 4173), and ENGL 4174 (or DRAM 4174) for credit.

PrerequisitesENGL 2173 (or DRAM 2173) and  ENGL 2174 (or DRAM 2174) and ENGL 3170 (or DRAM 3170), and permission of the Director of Drama. 

ENGL4173Thesis Production (Cross-Listed: DRAM 4173)3 ch (practical work)

Open to students completing the final year of a Double Major or Minor in Drama. Working in groups, students produce a full-scale production for Theatre UNB, under the supervision of the Director of Drama.

NOTE: Students can obtain credit for only one of ENGL 4173, DRAM 4173, ENGL 4170, and DRAM 4170

Prerequisites: ENGL 2173 (or DRAM 2173) and ENGL 2174 (or DRAM 2174) and ENGL 3170 (or DRAM 3170), and permission of the Director of Drama.
ENGL4174Independent Drama Project (Cross-Listed: DRAM 4174)3 ch (practical work)

Open to students completing the final year of a Double Major or Minor in Drama. Under the supervision of the Director of Drama, students complete an independent project designed to further their knowledge of a theatre discipline of their choice.

NOTE: Students can obtain credit for only one of ENGL 4174, DRAM 4174, ENGL 4170, and DRAM 4170

PrerequisitesENGL 2173 (or DRAM 2173) and ENGL 2174 (or DRAM 2174) and ENGL 3170 (or DRAM 3170), and permission of the Director of Drama.
ENGL5083Literary Theory and Critical Practice3 ch (3C) [W]
A study of the development of literary theory and criticism, with some attention to critical practice. Required for the Single and Joint Honours programs.

NOTE: Students cannot obtain credit for both ENGL 3083 and ENGL 5083.

ENGL5127William Blake's Early Illuminated Poetry (O)3 ch (3S) [W]
"I must create a system or be enslaved by another man's" — so wrote William Blake (1757-1827), a radical Romantic poet-engraver, painter, and printmaker. In this course, we will examine some of Blake's best known early illuminated poems, many of which Blake produced during an exceptionally productive and turbulent period of the 1790s, when he lived in Lambeth, on the south side of the Thames. In addition to close readings and grappling with Blake's visionary mythology, we will keep a foot in what Saree Makdisi, in his study of Blake, aptly calls "the impossible history of the 1790s." Against the caricature of Blake as an ahistorical madman-artist outside of his own time, we will track how Blake's work confronts the economics, politics, religion, and emergent ideas in the arts and sciences of the Romantic era.

Prerequisite: B+ average in ENGL; open to ENGL Honours Students.
ENGL5138Beasts and Beauties (O) 3 ch (3S) [W]
Woof. Meow. Oink. This course examines the wide array of representations of animals in nineteenth-century British literature. While acknowledging the importance of Darwinian evolutionary theory, we will focus on the literary and artistic representations of humanity's changing relationship with the animal. Threaded throughout the novels, poetry, essays, political cartoons, and taxidermy art, the figure of the animal becomes a vexing intersection for the overlapping discourses of race, gender, class, community, and ethics in the nineteenth century. At once an object to be preserved and displayed in the cabinets of natural history, the animal was also garnering increased sympathy and legal protection as new societies against animal cruelty were founded and Acts were passed (e.g., the Cruelty to Animals Act, 1876). In order to enrich our understanding of the animal's role within the nineteenth-century British imaginary, we will consider popular representations of nineteenth-century animality, including the political cartoons of James Gillray and the public's response to the development of zoos.

Prerequisite: B+ average in ENGL; open to ENGL Honours students.
ENGL5144Poverty and American Literature (O)3 ch (3S) [W]
A striking feature of the United States is the weakness of its welfare state. One reason for this weakness is many Americans' belief that welfare recipients fall into the category of the undeserving poor: citizens who are responsible for their poverty. This course explores literary texts that address causes and effects of poverty and grapple with the problem of representing it. The course asks questions like the following: How have the aesthetics of poverty changed since the early twentieth century? How might writers represent the poor without abjecting them?

Prerequisite: B+ average in ENGL; open to ENGL Honours students.
ENGL5148African-American Literature (O)3 ch (3S) [W]
"The problem of the Twentieth-Century is the problem of the color line," W.E.B. Du Bois announced in 1903. Du Bois wrote when Jim Crow racism was firmly in place in the United States, segregating African Americans, ensuring their impoverishment, and denying them political representation. This course explores Jim Crow's legacy in twentieth- and twenty-first century African-American literature. Why are Americans still haunted by Jim Crow? What would it take to exorcise that ghost?

Prerequisite: B+ average in ENGL; open to ENGL Honours students. 
ENGL5167The American Sitcom and Feminist Theory (O)3 ch (3S) [W]
This course examines American sitcoms and feminist writing and activism from the 1950s to the present. Taking into account the generic conventions of the situational comedy, the seminar explores how the sitcom has engaged with debates within feminist thought, especially around race, economic structures, gender and sexual identities, reproductive rights, and gender-based violence. By linking theory to television, the course investigates both intellectual and activist history and the ways corporate culture resists, responds to, and creates social change. 

Prerequisite: B+ average in ENGL; open to ENGL Honours students. 
ENGL5182Rethinking the Gothic in English-Canadian Literature (O)3 ch (3S) [W]
In his well-known satirical poem, aptly titled "Can. Lit., (1962)" Earle Birney argues that "[i]t's only by our lack of ghosts that we're [Canadians] haunted." Paradoxically, Birney subsequently stirred substantial debate over what spectres continue to shape English-Canadian literature and, more broadly, Canada as a nation. Birney is one in a long line of writers who recognize the fundamentally ambivalent relationship between colonialism and haunting as manifested in our national literature and culture, ranging from poems and short stories to plays, novels, paintings, and films. This course explores and wrestles with critical and creative work written over the last forty years that characterizes and labels Canadian texts as "Gothic." We probe the benefits and liabilities of employing the "Gothic" label to describe the work of BIPOC writers and artists, especially those who may see such terms as a colonial stamp of approval.

Prerequisites: B+ average in ENGL; open to ENGL Honours students.
ENGL5184Identity in Atlantic-Canadian Literature (O)3 ch (3S) [W]
In this course, we will examine the central theme of identity in the poetry, fiction, drama, and film of contemporary Atlantic Canada. We will study a diverse range of primary course texts, addressing key questions concerning personal and collective identities as they relate to race, class, gender, sexuality, ability, and region. Region will indeed play a significant role in our readings of these texts — from the representation of racism and violence in Halifax-based poet El Jones's spoken word pieces and the social tensions of 1940s Fredericton in George Elliott Clarke's novel George & Rue to Maritime mental health care in Lynn Coady's Strange Heaven and the (figurative and literal) journey of two Two-Spirit brothers in Bretton Hannam's short film Wildfire. Our central readings of authors from the Maritimes and Newfoundland will be guided by secondary sources about issues related to Atlantic-Canadian histories and identities.

Prerequisite: B+ average in ENGL; open to ENGL Honours students.
ENGL5623Re-imagining the Long Poem: Critical and Creative Perspectives (O)3 ch (3S) [W]
In 1979, Michael Ondaatje announced that "the most interesting work being done by poets today can be found within the structure of the long poem." More than thirty years later, Ondaatje's statement still applies. This course is designed to offer a survey of contemporary Canadian long poems. Using sections of Smaro Kamboureli's study On the Edge of Genre as a framework for class discussion, we will explore such issues as: the long poem's relationship with genre and postmodernism; formal structures and innovations in the long poem; the tension between lyric and narrative in the long poem; and identity politics within the long poem. Poets studied include Dionne Brand, Anne Carson, George Elliott Clarke, Robert Kroetsch, Daphne Marlatt, Don McKay, Erin Moure, bpNichol, Michael Ondaatje, Lisa Robertson, and Phyllis Webb.

Prerequisite: B+ average in ENGL; open to ENGL Honours students.
ENGL5684Indigenous Futurism: Speculative Fiction and New Media for a New World (O)3 ch (3S) [W]
How can Indigenous epistemologies help in a world on the edge of economic, environmental, and spiritual catastrophe? This course examines how Indigenous authors use science fiction to reimagine the present and future of Indigenous communities. We explore what alternate realities authors envision and how they repurpose sci-fi conventions to reflect Indigenous knowledge and histories and to address issues such as colonization, history, land claims, and environmental destruction. The course examines a range of topics including time travel and reclaiming history, as well as dystopian visions of the city, the land, and the body. 

Prerequisite: B+ average in ENGL; open to ENGL Honours students. 
ENGL5983Women's Writing in the Atlantic World (O)3 ch (3S) [W]
This seminar explores writing in English from the early modern to the contemporary period by English women and by Indigenous, Black, and Settler women living in what we now call northeastern North America. The Atlantic World is defined by the colonial project that links the Americas with England and western Africa and by the circulation of commodities, ideas, diseases, and enslaved and free people. The course looks at how women's writing variously participated in or resisted this colonial history in thinking about issues such as race, slavery, nature, place, violence, history, and gender and sexuality. 

Prerequisite: B+ average in ENGL; open to ENGL Honours students.