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Faculty of Education
UNB Fredericton

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Graduate course listings

Course descriptions

Find descriptions of all graduate courses offered by the Faculty of Education in the UNB Graduate Calendar.

Courses by area of study

Determine where courses fall within the planning guide that may not be listed under each column requirement.

Course schedule

Use the timetable to find information about currently scheduled courses or see the tentative course schedule.

Summer 2019 (special topics)

ED 6108 Inclusive Second Language Education (3ch), July 2 to 6 (Tuesday to Saturday 9AM to 4PM) 

This course examines the theoretical constructs of universal design for learning (UDL) and how it intersects with second language teaching and learning.  In particular, we will explore foundational principles related to inclusive second language teaching, learning and assessment. Topics include:

  • Foundations of inclusive second language education
  • Affective, socio-affective, sociocultural factors that influence second language acquisition
  • Concepts such as learner autonomy, learner empowerment, advocacy, and self-efficacy
  • Inclusive pedagogies that support learners in the following areas: comprehension and production, focus and attention, and vocabulary development
  • Universal Language Actions and Differentiation
  • Principles of assessment within inclusive education

*This course would count as a Educational Foundations or Educational Practices requirement.

ED6109 Evidence-Based Practices in Literacy Instruction (3ch), July 8 – 12 (Monday to Friday 9AM to 4PM)

This course will focus on the foundations of literacy and on evidence-based practices that promote the development of speaking, listening, reading and writing for second or additional language learners. Specifically, we will examine the elements to be taught for each skill, teaching techniques, and the sequence of instruction.  Also, ways to release the teacher for individual or small-group pedagogical interventions will be discussed. *This course would count as a Educational Practices requirement.

ED6108 Comprehensive Sex Education: Theories, Research-Informed Pedagogies, & Ethical Issues (3ch), July 29 - August 2 (Monday to Friday 9AM to 4PM)

This course is intended for graduate students to engage in an exploration of critical and ethical debates surrounding sex education curricula and instruction across Canada. Learners will build understanding and analytical skills through critical discussions of the theoretical orientations that guide sex education within and beyond schools. Learners will also explore ways in which educators can use research-informed best practices in sex education by critically engaging with a variety of tools, resources, and pedagogies. The goal of the course is for learners to understand research-based approaches to comprehensive sex education, and the implications of sex education for young people in Canada. The course fulfils the Critical Literacy requirement on planning guides. The textbook for the course will be Sexuality in School: The Limits of Education (2014, U of Minnesota Press), available at the bookstore or through Amazon. * This course would count as a Critical Literacies requirement.

This video offers some information on the one-week intensive course: https://youtu.be/7Zy3yfRttOw

ED 6108 Wabanaki Land-based Learning - A Mi’kmaq Worldview: Language, Culture, Ceremony and Traditional Ecological Indigenous Knowledge (6ch), July 4 to July 13 (10 day/evening 8 AM to 8 PM)

 Additional Fees: $800.00 for accommodations, transportation, food and incidentals*

This land-based course will support learners as they engage with Wabanaki elders, knowledge keepers, scholars and storytellers and their work in gaining an understand of traditional Indigenous ecological knowledges, scholarship and perspectives, and a range of contemporary, historical and oral literatures on land and healing, protection of waters and species, Indigenous ceremonies and reciprocity, cultural and archeological repatriation, language and cultural renewal and reclaiming, and protections for the sovereignty of Indigenous peoples as related to kinship, ecological wellness, and sustainability.

The engagement of graduate students during this 10 day “on the land experience” at Kouchibouguac National Park (2 days/nights) and following at Metepenagiag Heritage Park (8 days/nights) will provide access to elders and elder teachings, Indigenous ceremonies, and hands on learning of sustainable traditional knowledge, and traditional ecological knowledge systems. An infusion of the natural will be balanced with traditional ceremonies and in-class lectures. Through readings, storywork, field visits of traditional sites, observational skills, and through engaging with community leaders, scholars and elders, students will be given an opportunity to learn about traditional ceremonies, language, artistic and ecological learning and land-based education as pedagogy.

 

Summer 2018 (special topics)

Ed 6108 Critical Literacies and Graphic Novels (face-to-face)
July 23 to July 27 (9 a.m. – 4 p.m.)
This special topic children and young adolescents’ literature course is intended for graduate students at the master’s level. Class participants will gain an understanding of the literary, visual, textual and technical aspects of graphic novels as contextualized with/in theoretical frameworks drawn from critical literacies, culturally situated reader-response theories, multi-modal and visual literacies. Critical literacies and culturally situated reader response theorists support the inclusion of graphic novels in educational settings as an inclusive and legitimate literary form, while multi-modality theorizing contributes to learning how to “read” multiple modes and thus elicit wide ranging interpretations of graphic novels. We will study well-established graphic novels, feminist and indigenous novels. In some cases, the novels will be paired with films.

ED 6108 Participatory Visual Research Methodologies (face-to-face)
July 9 to 13 (9 a.m. – 4 p.m.)
This special topics methodology course is intended for graduate students (master’s and PhD) to engage in participatory visual approaches to research and inquiry. Learners will build understanding and analytical skills through critically discussing the theoretical orientations that underpin participatory visual research and gain practical methodological experience by engaging in visual approaches (including: cellphilming, digital storytelling, drawing, map-making, participatory video, participatory visual fieldnotes, photo elicitation and photovoice). Learners will also explore ways in which educators can use participatory visual inquiry models in pedagogical spaces. The goal of the course is for learners to understand the ethical issues that confront researchers who engage in visual inquiry and explore various lenses for exploring, analyzing, evaluating, disseminating and archiving visual research.

ED 6108 Inclusive Second Language Education (face-to-face)
July 3 - 7 (9 a.m. – 4 p.m.)
This course runs Tues to Saturday since Monday is Canada Day. This course will examine the theoretical constructs of universal design (ADL) and second language learning. In particular, students will explore foundational principles related to inclusive second language teaching, learning and assessment.

Winter 2018 (special topics)

ED 6108: Globalization and Education, China Cohort - Beijing, China (blended course)

  • April 14 & 15 (9 a.m. – 5 p.m.)
  • April 18 (6 – 9 p.m.)
  • April 20 (6 – 9 p.m.)
  • April 21 & 22 (9 a.m. – 5 p.m.)

May also require some online work.

This course will examine the impact of the many facets of globalization on education systems and educators around the world. It is designed to help educators situate policy and practice in their jurisdictions in the context of global trends and debates and will consider issues such as: the impact of migration and diversity on school systems and classrooms around the world; teacher mobility; curriculum design and implementation; standardized testing; teacher accountability; teacher education; teacher professionalism; parental and school choice; indigenous peoples and education; inclusion; and technology. The intention is for students to understand globalization as a multifaceted phenomenon and how it impacts education around the world and in their own contexts.

ED 6108: Teaching and Learning in Multilingual Contexts (online)
This course would provide both theoretical and practical information related to the teaching of students learning English is an additional language (EAL). It will examine core principles and established practices related to the education of students of diverse linguistic and cultural backgrounds in mainstream English schools. Topics will include linguistic and cultural support, differentiated instruction within an inclusive learning context, cultural awareness and sensitivity. The course will also promote a balanced literacy approach that incorporates and values the learner’s first language in the acquisition of EAL.

ED 6108: Globalization and Education (face-to-face)
Thursdays (5 – 8 p.m.) This course will examine the impact of the many facets of globalization on education systems and educators around the world. It is designed to help educators situate policy and practice in their jurisdictions in the context of global trends and debates. Cancelled due to low enrolment.

ED 6108: School District Administration and Leadership (online)
This course focuses on the work of school district leaders, including the superintendent. Major course modules include school district governance, organizational leadership, pedagogical leadership and stakeholder relationships. Specific topics include strategic planning, policy-making, financial management, instructional leadership, leading change and relationships with government, labour groups, the public and the media.

ED 6108: Introduction to Indigenous Research Methodologies (blended course)
Three face-to-face courses: Saturday, 9 a.m. – 4 p.m. on Jan. 27, Feb. 24 & March 24. The rest of the course will be online.
As an introductory research course, this course guides students towards understanding why methods matter. Rather than insisting upon an Indigenous approach to research, this course creates space to discuss how research has conventionally been conducted and why this has been problematic in Indigenous contexts; what it means to decolonize research; and how we can engage with and validate Indigenous ways of knowing and being within the context of academic research and educational practice.