Profile page for: Janice Lawrence | UNB

Janice Lawrence

Associate Professor

PhD

Biology

Bailey Hall 210

Fredericton

jlawrenc@unb.ca
1 506 458 7842



Other titles

Associate Dean of Science

Academic interests

  • Aquatic microbial ecology
  • Harmful algal blooms
  • Virus-host interactions

Brief biography

Dr. Janice Lawrence completed her BSc (Marine Biology) and PhD (Biological Oceanography) at Dalhousie University. Her PhD thesis investigated the source and dynamics of algal toxins in cultured shellfish. She completed a post-doctoral fellowship at UBC studying the role of viruses in phytoplankton ecology, and received an NSERC University Faculty Award to join UNB in 2003.

Janice is currently examining the distribution of toxin-producing cyanobacteria in New Brunswick waterbodies using genetic tools. She also collaborates with researchers at the University of Bergen studying the co-evolution of viruses and their hosts, and NORCE (Norway) examining the fate of viruses in marine ecosystems. In addition, she co-supervises students studying virus and viroid infections in crop plants at the Fredericton Research and Development Centre.

In her spare time Janice loves skiing, rowing, hiking, and biking adventures.

Courses taught

  • BIOL3493: Introduction to Virology

Selected research

J. Lawrence, J. Töpper, E. Petelenz-Kurdziel, G. Bratbak, A. Larsen, E. Thompson, C. Troedsson, J. Ray. 2018. Viruses on the menu: The appendicularian Oikopleura dioica efficiently removes viruses from seawater. Limnology and Oceanography 63: S244-253.

R.L Smith, J. Lawrence, M. Shukla, M. Singh, X.S. Li, H. Xu, D. Chen, K. Gardner, X. Nie. 2018. First report of the occurrence of Coleus blumei viroid 6 in Coleus blumei outside of China. Plant Disease. DOI:10.1094/PDIS-10-18-1875-PDN.

C.M. Brown, D.A. Campbell & J.E. Lawrence. 2007. Resource dynamics during infection of Micromonas pusilla by the virus MpV-Sp1. Environmental Microbiology. 9(11):2720-2727.

J.E. Lawrence, A.M. Chan & C.A. Suttle. 2002. Viruses causing lysis of the toxic bloom-forming alga, Heterosigma akashiwo (Raphidophyceae) in coastal sediments of British Columbia, Canada. Limnology and Oceanography 47(2):545-550.

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