Stephan Dombrowski

Assistant Professor

PhD

Kinesiology, Faculty of

KIN 314

Fredericton

stephan.dombrowski@unb.ca
1 506 453 4803



Other titles

Health Psychologist

Research interests

  • Health behaviour change
  • Behaviour change intervention development
  • Psychological theories of behaviour and behaviour change
  • Weight loss and weight loss maintenance

Dr. Dombrowski is interested in the development, testing and application of behaviour change theory and interventions for health, particularly in relation to aspects concerning behaviour change maintenance, and the use of evidence based behaviour change techniques. His research to date covers a range of health behaviours (e.g. diet, physical activity, health service use) and populations (e.g. members of the public, individuals with risk factors for health, or health care professionals). In his empirical work Dr. Dombrowski uses qualitative, quantitative as well as mixed methodologies.

Biography

Dr. Dombrowski is a Health Psychologist. He has joined the Faculty of Kinesiology at the University of New Brunswick in 2018 as Assistant Professor. Previously Dr. Dombrowski was employed by the University of Stirling (UK, Scotland) as Senior Lecturer, and as a post doctoral researcher at Newcastle University (UK, England) and the University of Aberdeen (UK, Scotland).

Dr. Dombrowski obtained his PhD in Health Psychology from the University of Aberdeen (UK, Scotland) in 2010, and the practice-based qualification in Health Psychology from the British Psychological Society in 2012. He also holds an MSc in Health Psychology from the University of Sussex (UK, England), and a BA in Psychology from the University of Essex (UK, England).

Current research projects

  • Text message-based behaviour change intervention for weight loss and weight loss maintenance in obese men
  • Text message-based behaviour change intervention for weight loss and weight loss maintenance overweight new mothers
  • School-based behaviour change intervention for increasing sun safety behaviour and skin cancer detection in young people
  • Dyadic behaviour change intervention for increasing walking behaviour post-stroke
  • Asset based behaviour change intervention to promote uptake and maintenance of breastfeeding
  • Animation-based behaviour change intervention to reduce patient delay for Acute Coronary Syndrome

Publications