Registrar's Warrants

NOTE: See the beginning of Section F for abbreviations, course numbers and coding.

APSC1011Mechanics I4 ch (3L 1T)
The fundamental concepts of vector analysis as applied to particles and rigid bodies. Forces and moments are introduced with vector algebra, followed by the application of equilibrium conditions. Free body diagrams (FBDs) are used to analyze trusses, frames and machines, as well as internal member forces (shear force and bending moment diagrams for beams). The analysis of kinematics of particle motions along straight and curved paths. Additional topics include friction, centroids, centers of gravity, and moments of inertia (area and mass). The course topics focus on visualizing concepts in mechanics and developing problem solving techniques. 

Co-requisite: MATH 1003.
APSC1015Mechanics I Laboratory1 ch (3L*)
A selection of experiments to accompany APSC 1011.

Co-requisite: APSC 1011.
APSC1021Mechanics II4 ch (3L 1T)
Vector analysis and its application to the analysis of motion of particles and rigid bodies. Newton's three laws of motion. The dynamics of particle motion along straight and curved paths. Coriolis acceleration. The dynamic analysis of particles and rigid bodies executing general plane motion based on Newton's second law (F=ma), work and kinetic energy, linear and angular impulse, and linear and angular momentum. Rotation of rigid body about a fixed axis. Simple harmonic motion.


Prerequisites:
(APSC 1011 and APSC 1015) or APSC 1013.


Co-requisite: MATH 1013 or permission of the instructor.
APSC1025Mechanics II Laboratory1 ch (3L*)
A selection of experiments to accompany APSC 1021.

Prerequisite: APSC 1015 or APSC 1013.


Co-requisite: APSC 1021.
BA4904Business Simulation0 ch (1L)
The course provides students with an opportunity to demonstrate their program learning through an engaging, team-based competition using both business cases and software simulations.

Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor.
CMPE1003Programming and Problem Solving for Engineers4 ch (3C 3L*)
Introduction to the use of digital computers for problem solving and communicating solutions. Covers the use of procedures, decisions, loops, and arrays focusing on scientific and engineering problem analysis, algorithm design, and program structure. Also includes organizing, tabulating, and graphing program output with different software tools to communicate results. This course uses the Python programming language. NOTE: Credit will not be given for both CMPE 1003 and CS 1003.

Prerequisites: MATH 1003 or MATH 1001 and MATH 1503.
COMS3801ST COMS: Sport, Health & Media3 ch (3C)
This course is designed with a focus on sport (not only fans but also those concerned with the role of sport in society), health (physical and mental health), and communications media. Topics of focus may include: media coverage of concussions and CTE (chronic traumatic encephalopathy) in professional hockey, or the roles of various media in promoting, sustaining, or challenging harmful gender roles in sport. Students will be challenged to think critically about mediated sporting events and celebrities.

Prerequisites: Successful completion of fifteen term-courses, including COMS 2001, or permission of the instructor.
CS2724Cloud-based Web App Development4 ch (3C 1L) [P]
This course provides the opportunity to develop a system on a cloud platform. Students will learn the basics of cloud computing infrastructure, interfaces and tools to set up working websites on the internet, experiences of using modern web technology such as HTTP protocol, HTML, CSS, Python libraries for web applications, and basic JavaScript syntax and libraries needed to develop functioning web applications. The course will cover examples of advanced concepts such as message digest, encryption and secure communications.

Prerequisite: CS 2704 or CS 1083.
ECON1015Microeconomics Through an Indigenous Lens3 ch (3C)
The core elements of modern market-based microeconomic theory are explored and contextualized with an Indigenous worldview. Central to the course is local delivery through team teaching utilizing community members and project work implementing microeconomic principles relevant to local community needs.

Prerequisite: Enrolment in the First Nations Governance and Leadership Certificate program.
ECON1025Macroeconomics Through an Indigenous Lens3 ch (3C)
The core elements of modern market-based macroeconomic theory (measurement of economic activity, fiscal, and monetary policy) are explored and contextualized with an Indigenous worldview. Central to the course is local delivery through team teaching utilizing community members and project work implementing macroeconomic principles relevant to local community needs.


Prerequisite: 
Enrolment in the First Nations Governance and Leadership Certificate program.

ENGG5711Engineering in Society: Health and Safety3 ch (3C)
An examination of health and safety practices including legal aspects of safety and a basic knowledge of potential hazards and their control procedures (i.e. mechanics and structures, walking and working surfaces, electrical safety, tools and machines, transportation, materials handling, temperature and pressure extremes, radiation, noise and vibration, chemicals, ventilation, and hazardous waste). Managing safety and health through risk assessment and management, safety plans and programs; practices and procedures to improve safety. Duties and legal responsibilities for which engineers are accountable and the effects on public safety and trust.
ENGG5721Engineering Management3 ch (3C)

Introduction to management principles and their impact upon social and economic aspects of engineering practice. Engineering management knowledge topics include market research, assessment and forecasting; strategic planning; risk and change management; product, service and process development; engineering projects and process management; financial resource management; marketing, sales and communication management; leadership and organizational management; professional responsibility. New paradigms and innovative business models include sustainable production, products, service systems and consumption, best practices and practical examples of successful implementations of sustainable scientific and engineering solutions.

Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor.
ENGL3317Queering the Victorian3 ch (3C) [W]
Students will study the complex variety of discourses which led to the naming of homosexuality in the late-Victorian period, the persons who lived queer lives, and the representations of those persons in literature and other media from the 19th to the 21st century.

Prerequisite: 9 ch ENGL.
ENGL3738Trans-Atlantic Literatures3 ch (3C) [W]
An examination of selected texts of the long 18th century within a framework of transatlantic literary studies. 

Prerequisites: 9 ch of 1-2000 level ENGL or permission of the instructor.
ENGL3925Creative Writing II3 ch (3C) [W]
Through intensive workshops, this course is centred around three major creative writing genres: short fiction, poetry and drama. In tandem with close readings of representative samples of writing from established artists, you will analyze and constructively evaluate peer writing.

Prerequisite: 9 ch of English.
HIST1701The Medical Experience3 ch (3C) [W]
This course introduces students to the history of health and medicine in western traditions. Using the medical experience with various epidemics (bubonic plague, smallpox, yellow fever, cholera, malaria, tuberculosis, pandemic influenza, and HIV/AIDS) students will develop an appreciation for historical thinking using health as an entry point.
HIST2215Cdn Healthcare: Pox, Plague & Patients3 ch (3C) [W]
This course explores changes in health and illness care in Canada over four centuries, with an emphasis on the twentieth century. We will explore the historical development of medicine, nursing, social work, pharmacy, and public health as interrelated yet distinct spheres of practice. We will also look at how particular historical events and movements, such as the 1918-1919 influenza epidemic, the First and Second World War, and the modern hospital movement, helped to shape how Canadians perceive and provide healthcare.
HIST3674History of Nursing in Canada3 ch (3C) [W]
This course examines the development of Canadian nursing from its religious roots in seventeenth-century Quebec to the modern hospital movement of the twentieth century. It emphasizes ways in which politics, gender, race, and religion helped to shape nursing into a predominantly hospital-based profession comprised of white women and looks at the efforts of men and minority women to earn a place in nursing in Canada and elsewhere.

Prerequisite: Suitable for student from any discipline who have completed at least twenty term-courses. Students should normally have completed at least one term-course in History. (Or permission of instructor).
HIST3854Women and War3 ch (3C) [W]
This course thematically examines the relationship between women and war from the eighteenth to the mid-twentieth centuries. Themes to be examined include perceived gender suitability for women in nursing and other caregiving and domestic roles in European and North American armies, women’s political and societal activities on the home front during wartime, and the impact of war on women living in theatres of war.

Prerequisites:
Suitable for student from any discipline who have completed at least twenty term-courses. Students
should normally have completed at least one term-course in History.
HIST4636Medicine & Env: Climates of Health3 ch (3C) [W]
This course explores the connections between medicine and environment from the Early Modern period to the early twenty-first century with a focus on Europe and North America, though global concerns will also be discussed. Topics include: imperialism and medicine, hospital and home architecture, the importance of ventilation, sanitation and public health, marketing "healthy environments" to migrants, 20th century synthetic chemicals, health, and the environmentalism movement, modern environmental medicine, and the relationship between climate change and health.

Prerequisite: Suitable for student from any discipline who have completed at least twenty term-courses. Students should normally have completed at least one term-course in History. (Or permission of instructor).
HUM3686Wolastokwey Latwewaken3 ch (3C)
A beginner's level course that will explore the fundamentals of Wolastokwey language and oral comprehension with the opportunity to participate verbally through short conversations. 
PHIL2005Philosophy of Person3 ch (3C)
This course aims to provide students with a general introduction to the philosophical investigation of what it means to be a person. We will examine different approaches to human nature, the differences between human persons and animals, and human persons and machines. Other themes include the basic drives or instincts behind human behaviour, the human capacity for evil, the human capacity for love, self-identity, soul, mind, brain and body, depersonalisation, personal relationships, freedom and self-authenticity. The following questions will guide us through the course: What is human nature? What is it to be human? Is the human being a communal being? What is the self? Who am I? What does it mean to ‘become a person’ and to ‘become myself?’ How does who I am effect what I do? Does what I do matter? How should I live my life? What is the role of love in the life of the human
person?
PHIL3087Philosophy and Contemporary Film3 ch (3C)
Thinking Film: Philosophy at the Movies. Through an exploration of contemporary films this course asks the question: can film itself do the work of philosophy? The course will explore diverse film genres and philosophical themes, drawing on North American as well as international films, with a particular focus on films from the 1960s to the present.
PHIL3903Kant's Theoretical Philosophy3 ch (3C) [W]
This is an intensive study of the philosophy of mind, epistemology, and ontology articulated in Kant's Critique of Pure Reason. Students will gain a mastery of the central arguments for transcendental idealism and how it relates to both empiricism and rationalism.

Prerequisite: PHIL 1002.
POLS3278Canadian Courts and Legislatures3 ch (3C) [W]
This course analyzes the impact of the inter-relationship of courts and legislatures on policy making at both the provincial and federal levels.
POLS3651Canada and the Americas3 ch (3C) [W]
This course discusses Canadian foreign policy towards the region with special emphasis on the influence of the United States.

Prerequisite: POLS 1301 or POLS 2601 or permission of the instructor.
SOCI4024Special Topics in Visual Ethnography3 ch (3C) [W]
How do we see the social world and use visual tools to solve social problems? In this course, students learn the appropriate theories and techniques to effectively apply visual methods like video and photography to address major social issues. This class offers a deeper foray into topics introduced in SOCI 2802, with a strong emphasis on visual ethics, visual REBS, interpreting visual data, and conducting culturally intelligent visual research. There will be exercises in editing, filming and shooting, as well as special guest presentations by experts in the field. Students will pursue a major research question, conduct practical exercises and complete the term with a major visual project and written project guide.

Prerequisites:
SOCI 1001 or equivalent, two term-courses in lower level Sociology, SOCI 2802, and two term-courses in upper level Sociology, all with grades of C or better or permission of the instructor.
SOCI4025Special Topics: Disability Studies3 ch (3C) [W]
This course will provide students with an in-depth understanding of the different theoretical and methodological approaches and key empirical findings within the field of disability studies, with a focus on sociological interventions. Here disability is used as an umbrella term to include physical disability, intellectual disability, deafness, blindness, mental health and addiction labels, neurodiversity and chronic illness, etc. Topics will include (but are not limited to) models of disability, ableism/saneism/audism, institutionalization, eugenics, settler-colonialism, education, income support, housing, representation, disability justice, and disability movements. The work of scholars with lived-experience will be prioritized. Students are encouraged to bring their own interests into the classroom.

Prerequisites: SOCI 1001 or equivalent, two term-courses in lower level Sociology, and three term-courses in upper level Sociology, all with grades of C or better or permission of the instructor.
SOCS2201Urban Development & Sustainability3 ch (3C)
This course will provide you with the knowledge and approaches to understand and address key concepts of local planning and sustainability. As a special topics course, you will explore ways to develop a practical and sustainable strategy for Canadian urban centers, in light of important issues such as global warming, immigration or addressing a community problem. You will consider macro-economic, social, and environmental challenges at local, regional, and global levels, to develop sustainable action plans, to employ planning initiatives in community development, and ultimately to propose strategies and solutions that suggest a remedial framework for various urban issues. This course will be of particular interest to arts (political science, urban studies) and business
students.