Anthropology Courses

ANTH6001Anthropology Honours Seminar3 ch

Students explore the research process through conducting an individual research project in anthropology, developed in conjunction with the instructor. In addition, students engage in professional development and experiential opportunities.

*****Students who completed the undergraduate version of this course are not permitted to enroll in the graduate version. The graduate version includes expanded readings, assignments, and/or presentations.*****

ANTH6002
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ANTH6003
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ANTH6004
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ANTH6005
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ANTH6111Resource Extraction, Conflict, and Resistance3 ch

Cutting timber, digging metals, pumping oil, fracking gas, trapping animals, catching cod, planting grains, and many other human activities are (or have been) essential to the global economy. Every day, we rely on the commodities produced by commercializing these so-called natural resources. This course does not ask, is this good or bad? Instead, it asks, what does the commodification of nature do? Topics include how resource extraction changes our planetary prospects for ecological and cultural survival and how resource conflicts emerge. We will learn from the new and old writings by environmental anthropologists, and gain insight into different theoretical approaches to the anthropology of natural resource extraction and the commodification of nature.

*****Students who completed the undergraduate version of this course are not permitted to enroll in the graduate version. The graduate version includes expanded readings, assignments, and/or presentations.*****

ANTH6113Environment, Infrastructure, and Design3 ch

Roads, pipelines, dams, and other infrastructures are the literal frameworks that underpin our everyday lives. Just as infrastructures transform ecosystems, livelihoods, and landscapes, they also generate new experiences of nature, work, and connection to place. This course uses the perspective of applied environmental anthropology to understand relationships between human environments, infrastructures, and design frameworks. What are the impacts of infrastructures on cultural and natural resources, and how can impact assessment and design mitigate such impacts? How can culturally competent stakeholder engagement, universal design, or other approaches help us to build infrastructure that is more accessible and responsive to diverse community needs? Intended for a broad audience, this course is an interdisciplinary introduction to the theory and practice of socially and environmentally sustainable infrastructure systems. 

*****Students who completed the undergraduate version of this course are not permitted to enroll in the graduate version. The graduate version includes expanded readings, assignments, and/or presentations.*****

ANTH6313Archaeology, Heritage, and the Public(s)3 ch

How do communities and various publics produce, interact with, construct, and contest knowledge about the past? Perspectives from archeology and critical studies of heritage are used to examine processes of knowledge creation, dissemination, mobilization, and transfer in archaeology, as well as the role of research modes in knowledge production (including applied research, conventional problem-oriented research, community-engaged research, and collaborative research). Topics will include discussion of critical heritage studies, citizen science, indigenous archaeology, post-normal science, and applied research such as cultural resource management.

*****Students who completed the undergraduate version of this course are not permitted to enroll in the graduate version. The graduate version includes expanded readings, assignments, and/or presentations.*****

ANTH6502Issues In Medical Anthropology3 ch

A course designed to evaluate the application of medical anthropology in understanding and improving human health problems. A selection of case studies reflecting the various dimensions of medical anthropology in different cultural contexts are considered. The course begins with an introduction to the research methods used in medical anthropology. The important theoretical constructs that have influenced the field of medical anthropology and their application in research problems are examined.

*****Students who completed the undergraduate version of this course are not permitted to enroll in the graduate version. The graduate version includes expanded readings, assignments, and/or presentations.*****

ANTH6524Paleopathology3 ch

This course focuses on the study of ancient human diseases and their origins through examination of their remains in the archaeological record. Only a few diseases leave their marks on bone and tooth enamel, the most common remnants of ancient populations. Students are taught how to identify these abnormalities and assess their potential implications for the health of a living person/population, and to interpret the bioarchaeological evidence to gain insight into the health of past populations.

*****Students who completed the undergraduate version of this course are not permitted to enroll in the graduate version. The graduate version includes expanded readings, assignments, and/or presentations.*****

ANTH6526Anthropology of Death3 ch

What Is death? All living things experience death, but humans are unique as we purposefully bury our dead, often with ceremony or ritual. Why Is there so much variation when it comes to the dead and how they are treated, celebrated, or feared? This course explores these questions from an anthropological perspective, speclflcally how we define death blologlcally and culturally and how this definition can and does change over time. 

*****Students who completed the undergraduate version of this course are not permitted to enroll in the graduate version. The graduate version includes expanded readings, assignments, and/or presentations.*****

ANTH6702Gender and Health (A)3 ch

A course designed to evaluate the gender dimension of health and disease, and addresses the articulation of gender roles and ideology with health status, the organization of health care, and health policy in a cross-cultural perspective. Gender is a cultural construct, and cultural ideas about women’s health and women’s bodies differ between social groups and historical periods. Gender issues pertain to men as well, and male gender roles and expectations are also culturally constructed. There are biomedical consequences to the cultural constructions of gender differences. The course examines how expressions of gender and power can play a role in prevention and treatment strategies.

*****Students who completed the undergraduate version of this course are not permitted to enroll in the graduate version. The graduate version includes expanded readings, assignments, and/or presentations.*****

ANTH6997
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