Jeff Frooman

Associate Professor

PhD (University of Pittsburgh)

Business Administration, Faculty of

Carleton Hall 206

Fredericton

frooman@unb.ca
1 506 451 6911



Research interests

  • Market morality
  • Trust and morality
  • Ethics of agency theory

Biography

  • PhD, University of Pittsburgh, 2002.
  • Jointly appointed between the the Faculty of Arts (philosophy) and Faculty of Business Administration (finance).
  • Received UNB Merit Award for 2018 in recognition of outstanding contributions to teaching, research and university service, Executive Director of the Society for Business Ethics, 2008-2013.
  • Co-chair of the Society for Business Ethics Emerging Scholars Program, 2012-present.
  • Division Chair, Social Responsibility Division of the Administrative Sciences Association of Canada, 2010.
  • Associate Editor, Business and Society, 2008-2010
  • Editorial Board, Business and Society, 2010-present
  • Editorial Board, Business Ethics Quarterly, 2008-present

Courses regularly taught

  • Phil 2201 Ethical Classics (Aristotle, Kant, and Mill)
  • Phil 2203 Ethical Issues in Business
  • Phil 3301 Symbolic Logic
  • Phil 3251 Applied Professional Ethics
  • Phil 3305 Capitalism vs. Communism

Recent articles in refereed journals

Pouryousefi, S., & Frooman, J. The consumer scam: An agency-theoretic approach. Journal of Business Ethics.

Wempe, B., & Frooman, J. Reframing the moral limits of markets debate: Social domains, values, allocation methods. Journal of Business Ethics.

Branzei, O., Frooman, J., McKnight, B., & Zietsma, C. 2018. Investor’s assessment of the impact of corporate social performance on default risk in long-term bond markets. Journal of Business Ethics, 148 (1): 183-203.

Fortis, Z., Maon, F., Frooman, J., & Reimer, G. 2018. Unknown knowns and known unknowns: Framing the role of organizational learning in corporate social responsibility development. International Journal of Management Reviews, 20 (2): 277-300.

Pouryousefi, S., & Frooman, J. 2017. The problem of unilateralism in agency theory: Towards a bilateral formulation. Business Ethics Quarterly, 27 (2): 163-182.