UNB joins national and international equity-focused groups | February 2020 | President's Newsletter | UNB

UNB joins national and international equity-focused groups

Image from Universities Studying Slavery Consortium: "Rotunda and Lawn B. Tanner engraving from Boye's Map of Virginia, Special Collections, University of Virginia Library, Charlottesville, Va.

Over the past couple months, UNB has joined two new organizations to help us in our work around equity, diversity and inclusion (EDI). I’m proud to announce UNB is now an Employer Partner with the Canadian Centre for Diversity and Inclusion (CCDI), which provides us with a number of benefits that will support us on our diversity journey.

This new resource will help bolster our EDI resources and expertise, which is something that we heard our community ask for during the strategic planning consultation sessions. The CCDI allows all UNB faculty, staff and students to access online training modules and resources such as:

The second group we’ve joined is the Universities Studying Slavery Consortium managed by the University of Virginia’s President’s Commission on Slavery and the University. We have begun our work to disentangle our rich, long-standing history and our connections to slavery and residential schools in New Brunswick through the work of UNB’s Working Group on the Principles of Naming or Renaming University Places. Being part of this international consortium will provide educational resources to our community and the opportunity to collaborate with other universities across North America.

Founded in 2015, the consortium has grown to 60 schools internationally and now includes schools confronting post-emancipation racism as well as those wrestling with slaveholding in the institution’s past. Our participation will connect us to a movement that has already gone well beyond a focus on slavery and into addressing contemporary issues such as race and higher education, inequality, and the complicated legacies of slavery in our communities.

Participation in the University Studying Slavery Consortium and The Canadian Centre for Diversity and Inclusion are two ways we’re working to be the place where our people contribute to and shape the major discussions and debates across the community. Thank you to Sula Levesque, UNB’s Human Rights Officer, and the rest of the people at UNB who are helping us achieve a more inclusive culture and advance diversity in all its forms.

Image from Universities Studying Slavery Consortium: "Rotunda and Lawn B. Tanner engraving from Boye's Map of Virginia, Special Collections, University of Virginia Library, Charlottesville, Va."