Our People

Dr. Cindy Brown

Dr. Cindy BrownDr. Cindy Brown is the Program Coordinator and Communications Manager for the Gregg Centre.

She holds a BA (Honours History) and an MA (History) from the University of New Brunswick and a PhD from Western University. In addition to teaching on Gregg Centre study abroad programs like UNB's The Second World War in Italy and War and the Canadian Experience: Teachers' Tour of France and Flanders, Brown is an instructor and advisor with the Faculty of Arts and the Department of History.

Her current research focuses on the impact of war on the people who live in the battlefield, particularly in Italy. She is working on a book on Allied and German policy toward civilians in the Italian campaign to consider how that policy changed over time and how the interaction between civilian and soldier caused the policy of the two armies to evolve.

She was co-editor of the Canadian Military History Special Sicily Edition (July 2013) in which her article, "'To Bury the Dead and Feed the Living': Allied Military Government in Sicily, 1943" was published.

Dr. David Charters, Senior Fellow

Dr. David ChartersDr. David Charters is one of Canada's foremost authorities on modern warfare, with particular expertise in the study of terrorism, countering terrorism, insurgency, counter-insurgency, and intelligence. Thus, his range of expertise goes to the heart of the Gregg Centre's mandate. He has taught, researched and published in the field for more than thirty years.

Dr. Charters was a co-founder of UNB's Centre for Conflict Studies, the predecessor of the Gregg Centre, and served as its director from 1986 to 2005. In addition to his academic teaching, he has served as a consultant to government and the media and has lectured frequently to professional audiences in the military, police and intelligence communities. From 2005 through 2008 Dr. Charters served on the federal government's Advisory Council on National Security.

His major publications include:

  • The British Army and Jewish Insurgency in Palestine, 1945-47 (Macmillan 1989) (author)
  • The Deadly Sin of Terrorism (Greenwood, 1994) (editor); After 9/11: Terrorism and Crime in a Globalised World (Centre for Foreign Policy Studies, 2005) (co-editor and contributing author)
  • Kandahar Tour: Turning Point in Canada's Afghan Mission (John Wiley & Sons 2008) (co-author)

Contact Information:

Telephone: (506) 458-7740, David Charters

Dr. Cheryl Fury

Dr. Cheryl FuryCheryl Fury holds a B.A. (Honours History & English) and an M.A. from the University of New Brunswick. She received her Ph.D. from McMaster University and held the Alexander O. Vietor Memorial Research Fellowship in Maritime History from the John Carter Brown Library. She currently teaches European History at the University of New Brunswick (Saint John) where she has won a number of teaching awards.

Her research focuses on the social history of the Tudor-Stuart maritime community. She has published a book, Tides in the Affairs of Men: The Social History of Elizabethan Seamen 1580-1603, as well as several articles and reviews in leading journals in print and on-line. She has also contributed entries and essays to a wide range of historical encyclopedias including The Oxford Encyclopedia of Maritime History, winner of the Dartmouth Medal. In addition, she is currently on the Editorial Board of The Northern Mariner, the official publication of the Canadian Nautical Research Society, and serves as a referee for a number of publishers. She is the editor and contributor to The Social History of English Seamen vol. I and vol. II which are forthcoming. She is currently researching the early voyages of the English East India Company.

Dr. Marc Milner, Director

Dr. Marc MilnerDr. Marc Milner is best known for his books on the Canadian navy and on the Battle of the Atlantic, starting with North Atlantic Run in 1985, and most recently Battle of the Atlantic (2003 & 2005) which won the CP Stacey Prize. He has also edited several volumes, has published widely in scholarly journals, and writes a regular column on naval history for Legion Magazine.

From 1983 to 1986 Milner was an historian with the Directorate of History, NDHQ, Ottawa, where he worked on volume II of the RCAF's official History, and the new official history of the Royal Canadian Navy.

In 1986, Milner joined the History Department at UNB and from then until 2005 was Director of UNB's Military and Strategic Studies Programme. He has served as Chairman of the Canadian Military Colleges Advisory Board, Vice Chair of the Board of Visitors of the Canadian Forces College, has edited the journal Canadian Military History, seen over fifty graduate students to completion, and conducted study tours of European battlefields on behalf of the Canadian Battlefields Foundation and the Canadian Armed Forces. He is currently on the Board of Governors of the Royal Military College of Canada, and since 2006 has been Director of The Gregg Centre.

Dr. Milner's current research projects focus on the Normandy campaign of 1944.  In addition to a volume for the New Brunswick Military Heritage Project book series titled From D-Day to Carpiquet: The North Shore Regiment at War, June-July 1944, his 2010 article in the Journal of Military History, “Stopping the Panzers,” won the Moncado Prize from the Society for Military History.  His next book builds on that article, and a major long-term academic project titled "Normandy 1944: The Struggle for Meaning and Legacy" is underway which seeks to deconstruct existing assumptions about the campaign and create a new paradigm for understanding it.

Contact Information:

Telephone: (506) 458-7428, Marc Milner

Dr. Alan Sears

Dr. Alan Sears.Dr. Alan Sears is a Professor of Social Studies Education in the Faculty of Education at UNB.  He has been a social studies teacher for more than 30 years working at all levels from primary to graduate school. In the Faculty of Education at UNB Alan teaches undergraduate courses in teaching methods, social studies education, and international education and graduate courses in research methods and educational policy.  He also regularly supervises PhD and MEd students. 

Alan’s research and writing have been in the fields of social studies, citizenship education, and history education.  He has authored more than 50 articles and book chapters and as well as authoring and editing both academic books and school textbooks.  Alan has been Associate Editor of the journal Citizenship Teaching and Learning since 2008 and in January 2014 will begin a term as editor. Some of his recent publications include the books Globalization, the Nation-State and the Citizen: Dilemmas and Directions for Civics and Citizenship Education (co-editor) and Education, Politics and Religion: Reconciling the Civic and the Sacred in Education (coauthor) both published by Routledge. 

Alan’s has a long-term research program focused on describing how teachers and students understand key ideas related to democratic citizenship and, as part of that, is currently co-investigator of a national study looking at how children and teachers understand ethnic diversity.  More recently, Alan’s research has included work on the connections between history and citizenship education, the process of history teacher education, and the relationship between religion and education. 

In 2011 Alan began a collaboration with colleagues in the Gregg Centre to develop a graduate course in education focused on the teaching of Canadian history and centred on the Cleghorn War and Memory Study Tour.  That course was first offered in the summer in the summer of 2012 and is now a regular part of the tour.

Dr. Matthew Sears

Dr. Matthew SearsDr. Matthew Sears is an assistant professor of Classics and Ancient History at UNB, a position he took up in July, 2013.  Prior to coming to UNB, he taught for two years at Wabash College, a liberal arts college in Indiana.  He is broadly interested in ancient Greek politics, society, and culture; cross-cultural contact in the ancient Mediterranean; ancient historiography; and the history of classical warfare.  His doctoral work focused on the inter-state and cross-cultural relationship between Athens and Thrace (a region on the northern periphery of the Greek world), particularly the experiences of a number of prominent Athenian military leaders.  His book on this topic, Athens, Thrace, and the Shaping of Athenian Leadership, has been published by Cambridge University Press. 

Currently, Sears is working on two book projects.  The first explores the importance of the Spartan general Brasidas' campaign in Thrace during the Peloponnesian War.  Brasidas inaugurated what we might call the "Spartan tradition of imperialism," the central idea of which is that it is a moral good to force peoples and states to be free, even by military means.  Such ideas have continued on to the present day where they are routinely dismissed as mere hypocrisy.  For Brasidas and the Spartans in the fifth-century BCE, however, there was no practical or philosophical contradiction in liberation even against the will of the liberated.  The other book, tentatively titled Battles and Battlefields of Ancient Greece: A Guide to their History, Topography, and Archaeology, is being co-written by Jake Butera of the University of North Carolina at Asheville, and is under contract with Pen & Sword books.  This book, a traveller’s guide, will include historical overviews, site descriptions, and detailed guides to further reading for twenty of Greece’s most important and evocative ancient battles.  Sears has published articles and presented papers on many aspects of ancient warfare, including the depiction of elite troops in the Iliad, the diplomatic techniques employed by the Persians during their invasion of Greece, and Thucydides’ literary treatment of an important battle during the Peloponnesian War.  A highlight of his teaching career was the detailed mock ancient battle he organized at Wabash College, which yielded a surprising number of insights not afforded by literary evidence alone.  

Sears received his Ph.D. in 2011 from Cornell University under the direction of the military historian Barry Strauss.  He was a fellow at the American School of Classical Studies at Athens during academic year 2007-2008, and earned his BA in 2004 from the University of New Brunswick, with honours in Classics and a minor in History. 

Dr. Lisa Todd

Dr. Lisa ToddLisa Todd is an Assistant Professor in the UNB Department of History where she teaches courses on Modern Germany and Europe, the First World War, the History of Gender and Sexuality and the History of the Holocaust. Her first book Sexual Treason: Soldiers and Civilians in First World War Germany (under review at Cambridge University Press), examines the varied wartime ramifications of intimate relationships between Germans and “foreigners” after 1914. Her other publications include: “The Soldier’s Wife Who Ran Away with the Russian: Sexual Infidelities in World War I Germany,” Central European History, Vol. 44 (2011): 257-278, “The Hun and the Home: Gender, Sexuality and Propaganda in First World War Europe,” in Troy Paddock, ed., Propaganda and the First World War (Currently under peer review with Brill Publishing),and “Shameful and Dangerous Women”: Sexual Promiscuity in World War I Germany,” in Annette Timm, Michael Taylor and Rainer Heine, eds., PopSex: Public and Private Sexuality in Twentieth-Century Germany (Currently under peer review with University of Michigan Press). Todd’s current project, entitled: “Sexual Violence in the First World War: Europe, Asia and Africa, 1914-1918,” focuses on an often-neglected aspect of soldier-civilian relations and reflects the growing interest in the First World War as a global conflict.

Mr. Brent Wilson, Director NBMHP

Brent WilsonBrent Wilson has worked at the Centre for Conflict Studies/Gregg Centre since 1989. He has also taught over forty courses in military history in UNB's Department of History and for RMC's Department of Continuing Education at CFB Gagetown. He has conducted numerous battlefield tours in Belgium, France, Canada, and the United States with the Gregg Centre, Canadian Battlefield Foundation, Security and Defence Forum, Tactics School at the Combat Training Centre, and commercial tour groups.  Recently, he has been assisting in the development of the New Brunswick Military History Museum at CFB Gagetown and the commemoration of the War of 1812 as a member of the New Brunswick War of 1812 Bicentennial Committee.

He has researched and written in the fields of contemporary international terrorism and the civil-military dimensions of peacekeeping operations. He contributed a chapter on the US response to international terrorism in The Deadly Sin of Terrorism, David Charters, ed., (Greenwood, 1994); and was co-editor of Military History and the Military Profession (Praeger, 1992).

He has also conducted extensive research on the early history of the British Army's experience with counter-insurgency warfare and the role of the New Brunswick militia in the early development of the Canadian Army. He is presently writing a history of the 26th (New Brunswick) Battalion during the First World War.

Among his publications are Hurricane Pilot: The Wartime Letters of W. O. Harry Gill, D.F.M., 1940-1943, Vol. 10 in the New Brunswick Military Heritage Project's book series, as well as a co-author on Kandahar Tour: Turning Point in Canada's Afghan Mission (John Wiley & Sons 2008).

Dr. Lee Windsor, Deputy Director

Dr. Lee WindsorLee Windsor is Deputy Director at The Gregg Centre for the Study of War and Society at the University of New Brunswick and holds the Eaton Chair in Canadian Army Studies.

He has a BA(H) from Acadia University, an MA from Wilfrid Laurier University and a PhD from the University of New Brunswick. He teaches in the field of modern war, specializing in the Canadian Army experience. He is a former member of the West Nova Scotia Regiment and the 8th Canadian Hussars (Princess Louise’s).

His Gregg Centre duties today include facilitating Canadian Forces professional development and education through the Army’s Combat Training Centre at nearby CFB Gagetown. His current research projects centre on Canada’s role in two world wars as well as on post-war overseas commitments from the Sinai to Afghanistan. On behalf of UNB and the Canadian Battlefields Foundation, he regularly guides groups of students, soldiers and the general public on study tours to battlefields in Italy, France, Belgium and Holland. His publications include Kandahar Tour: Turning Point in Canada's Afghan Mission, Steel Cavalry: The 8th (New Brunswick) Hussars and the Italian Campaign, as well as a series of book chapters, articles and government reports. 

Contact Information:

Telephone: (506) 453- 4911, Lee Windsor

Valerie Gallant, Administrative Assistant

Valerie GallantValerie Gallant joined the Gregg Centre team in January 2009. She is the core of our team serving as Office Manager and Accountant, as well as the Circulation Manager for the Journal of Conflict Studies.

Contact Information:

Telephone: (506) 453-4587

Fellows

Dr. R. Bruce Craig

R. BRUCE CRAIG is a professor of History at the University of Prince Edward Island, Canada, where he teaches American history.  A specialist in the history of espionage, Craig serves as the Maritime Representative for the Canadian Association For Security and Intelligence Studies (CASIS).  Craig received his Ph.D. from American University in 1999 and he possesses and MA in Public History from the University of California, Santa Barbara. His first book, Treasonable Doubt: The Harry Dexter White Espionage Case was published by the University Press of Kansas in 2004. He is currently writing a biography of American State Department official and alleged Soviet spy, Alger Hiss.Prior to moving to Canada Craig was the director of the National Coalition for History, a Washington D.C.-based advocacy organization that represents the historical and archival community on Capitol Hill. Craig possesses special expertise in Freedom of Information issues: he was the plaintiff in a landmark court decision (Craig v. USA) that affirmed that federal courts may unseal grand jury records for the purpose of scholarly historical research. Following that decision, he played a major role in preparing the successful court petition that unsealed the Alger Hiss grand jury records. Craig was also responsible for leading the effort to unseal the records of the House Un-American Activities Committee (HUAC) in 2001. Most recently, in January 2008, he prepared the lead historical brief for the National Security Archive's successful effort to unseal the grand jury records of the Ethel and Julius Rosenberg espionage case.

Dr. Glenn Leonard

Glenn Leonard joined UNB’s Faculty of Business Administration in 2006 as an Assistant Professor in the Accounting area. He has taught in the faculty since 2000 on all areas of accounting, corporate finance, organization design and competitive strategy, and financial statement analysis. He also teaches Balkan history in UNB’s History Department.

He is the co-author (with Marc Milner) of New Brunswick and the Navy, Four Hundred Years, and has several papers and conference proceedings to his credit, including two recent presentations on accounting and the British Army.

He was awarded Professor of the Year in 2007 by the FBA Undergraduate Business Society and has been nominated for the Allan P. Stuart award for Excellence in Teaching. Glenn is a professional accountant (CA) and has over 20 years experience in business. He has held managerial positions with Leonard Corporation, Ash, Casey and Thornton Chartered Accountants and Theatre New Brunswick. He has also served as the Vice Chair-Finance for the Harvest Jazz and Blues Festival.

 

Dr. Nicholas Tracy

Dr. Nicholas Tracy is an adjunct professor in the UNB History Department. Dr. Tracy's research interests include naval and seapower history from the age of sail to the present. He has made a life-long study of the strategic significance of naval forces in international relations, with particular attention to the questions of economic warfare and economic sanctions. He is an Associate of the Gregg Centre, a Member of the International Institute for Strategic Studies, Visiting Fellow of the Institute of Commonwealth Studies, University of London, UK, and Adjunct Professor of History at the University of New Brunswick. His books include Navies, Deterrence, and American Independence (University of British Columbia Press, 1988), Attack on Maritime Trade (London: Macmillan Press, UK, and Toronto University Press,1991), The Collective Naval Defence of the Empire: 1900 to 1940 (Navy Records Society Vol. 136, Aldershot, England: Ashgate, 1997), and Sea Power and the Control of Trade, Belligerent Rights from the Russian War to the Beira Patrol (Navy Records Society, Aldershot, England: Ashgate, 2005). He is currently completing with the assistance of the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada A Two-Edged Sword: The Navy as an Instrument of Canadian Policy.

Other books by Tracy have included Britannia's Palette: The Arts of Naval Victory (Montreal: McGill-Queens UP, February 2007), Nelson's Battles, the Triumph of British Seapower (Seaforth Publishing, July 2008), Miracle of the Kent, a tale of Courage, Fire and Faith (Westholm Press, 2008), and The Battle of Quiberon Bay 1759, Hawke and the Defeat of the French Invasion (Pen & Sword Maritime, 2010).



Visiting Scholars

 

Dr. Megan Woodworth

Dr. Megan Woodworth holds a PhD in English Literature from the University of Exeter. Her doctoral dissertation, "Becoming Gentleman: Women Writers, Masculinity, and War, 1778-1818," explored the intersection of war and politics in private life. It traced the evolution of the masculine ideals - chivalry, republican virtue, professional merit - that informed what it meant to be a gentleman in England between the Restoration and the end of the Napoleonic Wars through novels written by women in England during the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries.
Dr. Woodworth's interest in exploring war and society through literature continues in a new project that will investigate the connections between British literary culture and the American Revolutionary war tentatively titled "The Pursuit: Liberty, Happiness, and the American War of Independence in English Fiction, 1770-1790." She is particularly interested in the ways in which the political dispute over traditional English liberties, claimed by Revolutionaries and Britons alike, is translated into a personal family quarrel between tyrannical parents and ungrateful children, a theme frequently seen in contemporary fiction. Dr. Woodworth is a native Frederictonian and UNB alumna: she completed her BA (English/History) at UNB in 2003 followed by an MA (English) in 2005.

Research Affiliates


Dr. Stephen Carter

Dr. Stephen Carter specializes in the history of Europe and Iran since the Second World
War , as well as international affairs related to Iran's regional and nuclear policies.
He has published articles in "Journal of the History of Ideas and Islam" and "Christian
and Muslim Relations". His current SDF-funded project examines the impact of Iran's
regional policies on NATO's mission in Afghanistan and, in particular, Canada's efforts
in Kandahar. Dr. Carter completed his undergraduate studies at Atlantic Baptist
University and his PhD is from Durham University (UK). He is a member of Canadian
International Council (CIC) and Middle East Studies Association (MESA).


LCol. Chris Hand, CD

Chris Hand has been involved with the Gregg Center since its inception. His UNB graduate thesis was one of the first books published with the NBMHP, titled The Siege of Fort Beausejour, 1755. He has published in Canadian Military History magazine, has assisted in many battlefield tours at the Beausejour site, has helped organize joint conferences with the Gregg Center and the Combat Training Center, and has been a military/regimental representative on the Gregg Center Board of Directors.

Lieutenant Colonel Chris Hand CD is a serving officer in the Royal Canadian Regiment and is currently stationed at CFB Gagetown where he is Chief of Staff of 3 Area Support Group. His current project at the Gregg Center is to draft a second book on the 1776 Siege of Fort Cumberland /Beausejour.

Dr. Robert Dienesch

Dr Robert Dienesch specializes in 20th century American foreign policy and military history.  His MA thesis, "Submarines Against the Rising Sun: The Impact of radar on the American submarine campaign against Japan in 1943," (UNB 1996) was a pioneering work on the role that advanced radar played in the dramatic increase in the effectiveness of the American sub campaign late in the Second World War.  His PhD dissertation, "Reach for the Sky Partner: the development of Spy Satellites during the Eisenhower Administration," (UNB 2006), mapped out the origins of US spy satellite systems as part of Eisenhower's wider foreign policy, his attempts to curb defence spending and the rising military-industrial complex, and his strategy of war-avoidance.  Dr Dienesch is now preparing both manuscripts for publication and teaching part time at the University of Windsor.


 
Associated Faculty

• Dr. Jeff Brown joined the UNB Department of History in 2002. He is an historian of the United States, with a particular interest in the twentieth-century. His research interests include the history of US foreign policy.

• Dr. Greg Kealey presently serves as UNB's Vice President (Research). Dr. Kealey is a specialist in security and intelligence history. He is currently working on a history of the Canadian secret service with Reg Whitaker and Andy Parnaby.

• Dr. Sean Kennedy joined the UNB History Department in 1999; he holds a Ph.D. from York University. His research interests include the rise of ultra-nationalism in France during the 1930s and 1940s and international relations history. His latest project concerns militarization in the French Fifth Republic.

• Dr. William Kerr is a member and former Chair of the UNB Classics Department since 1987. Prof. Kerr is a specialist in Ancient Greece and Rome, Ancient military history and the Roman Army.

• Dr. Tom Workman joined UNB's Department of Political Science in 1994. He currently serves as Director of the International Development Studies Program. His research interests include modern political theory, leadership, international development and conflict studies.

Graduate Student Internships

The Gregg Centre offers opportunities for graduate student funding and work experience as Interns within our team. Positions include event coordination, communications, publications editing, and archive management.