Week One: May 29 to June 5 | UNB

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College of Extended Learning

Revelations: Week One

East Gallery

Sins of the Flesh

Artist statement

These works were selected from the exhibition (re)remembering shown at the UNB Art Centre in 2006. (re)remembering explored boundaries of what can be considered jewelry. In this work, I found individuals with permanent scars on their bodies usually scars with an unfavorable memory. I transformed these scars into objects of contemplation/beauty by gold-leafing their subtleties. The result was a visual transformation into a form of wearable art/jewelry. The photographic images were a way of memorializing the transformative event. I completed 15 of these transformations. An installation was mounted and included large-scale prints of the transformations (7 feet by 3 feet) and a symphony of voices (audio recordings of the participants) remembering the day the event occurred - which plays ambiently in the installation environment.

Artist bio

Photo of artist Patrick PerryPatrick Perry received a diploma in Fine Craft from the Jewelry/Metal Arts studio at the New Brunswick College of Craft and Design in 1997. He studied Sculpture and installation at the Ontario College of Art and Design in 1998 and in 1999 received his Bachelor of Fine Arts from the Nova Scotia College of Art and Design. In 2000, he received a Bachelor of Education from the University of New Brunswick. He graduated from the Maine College of Art with a Masters degree in Fine Arts in 2006 and in 2019 he completed a Master of Arts in Photography at Lehman College, New York.

He has worked as an Exhibit Designer and Coordinator, and as an Art Instructor. He currently teaches Jewelry, Sculpture, 3D Design, and Photography at Eastchester High School in Westchester, New York. He has participated in a number of group and solo exhibitions in Canada and the United States. He currently lives in New York City.

To learn more about Patrick Perry, please visit his website: http://patrickperry.art/

Interview with the artist

List of works

Scar A: Mary Pat, 2006
60.96 X 196.85 cm
Digital Print

Scar B: Joan, 2006
60.96 X 196.85 cm
Digital Print

Scar C: Kate, 2006
196.85 X 60.96 cm
Digital Print

Scar D: Justin, 2006
196.85 X 60.96 cm
Digital Print

Scar E: Annie, 2006
60.96 X 196.85 cm
Digital Print

Scar F: Annie, 2006
60.96 X 196.85 cm
Digital Print

Quote: https://www.goodreads.com/author/quotes/875661.Rumi

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West Gallery

Vanitas

Artist statement

“A photograph is a secret about a secret. The more it tells you the less you know.” - Diane Arbus

i·ma·go:
Entomology—an insect in its final, adult, sexually mature, winged state
after metamorphosis.
Psychoanalysis—an unconscious, idealized mental image of another person
or the self.

The Imago Project was conceived as a series of self-portraits representing images in a fictional Tarot, such as Oracle cards, inspired by Carl Jung’s concept of archetypes and the collective unconscious.

To realize the images, the artist meditated each night before bed on a word that would define each image: Persona, Trinity, Chrysalis and Dichotomy, as well as others. She then allowed her subconscious mind in dream-sleep to conceive of the image concepts and each morning journaled and sketched out the image ideas. Rather than think about the creation of the images, the artist made an effort to produce images directly from her subconscious, hoping to “tap into” the collective unconscious through dreams.

Once the images were conceived, the artist created sets and costumes to personify the archetypes she had imagined in dream-sleep into self-actualized portraits.

Using experimental photography techniques, the images were photographed in a large format camera, and the negatives were distressed using various caustic liquids, sandpaper, scratching, and drawing. Some images were also cut up and collaged, then re-photographed. All images were handprinted on 20x30 canvas painted with liquid light. Then the canvas was toned with blood, beet juice, coffee grains, tea and grape juice. The final images were framed in antique distressed frames.

IMAGO in Psychology

The term “imago” first appeared in the work of Carl Gustav Jung in 1912. Imago is an unconscious prototype of personae; the imago determines the way in which the subject apprehends others. It is elaborated based on the earliest real and phantasmatic intersubjective relations with family members. The imago is linked to repression, which in neurosis, through regression, provokes the reanimation of a parental imago. This regression is linked to a particular quality of the unconscious, that of being constructed through historical stratification.

Jung later replaced the term imago with archetype in order to express the idea that it involves impersonal, collective motifs. The imago "between the unconscious and consciousness, in a sense, as if in chiaroscuro." It is a partially autonomous complex that is not completely integrated into consciousness. Melanie Klein, continuing with Jung’s work, described “terrifying imagos” that provoke the most terrible states of anxiety in infants, caused by the death instinct within, by the trauma experienced at birth.

Susan Isaacs further defined 'imago' which refers to: an unconscious image; a person or part of a person; and includes all the somatic and emotional elements in the subject's relation to the imaged person, the bodily links in unconscious phantasy with the id, the phantasy of incorporation which underlies the process of introjection; which are largely repressed". Jacques Lacan drew the connection between imago and complex in which imago is the constitutive element of the complex, which constituted 3 stages: the weaning complex (Real), the intrusion complex (the mirror stage or Imaginary), and the Oedipus complex (the Symbolic).

Jungian Archetypes

“What moves me...is that it comes from some mysterious deep place...it comes mostly from some very deep choices somebody has made that take a long time and keep haunting them.” - Diane Arbus

Jungian archetypes are defined as universal, archaic symbols and primordial images (primordial types, that is, with universal images that have existed since the remotest times), that derive from the collective unconscious, a kind of innate unspecific knowledge, derived from the sum total of human history, which prefigures and directs conscious behavior. Archetypes, according to Jung, seek actualization within the context of an individual's environment and determine the degree of individuation.

Archetypes are unclear underlying forms from which images and motifs emerge such as: the great mother, the father, the child, the trickster, the shadow, the wise old woman, the wise old man, the hero, death, rebirth, animus and anima, the maiden, the goddess, god, and the crone. History, culture and personal context shape these manifest representations thereby giving them their specific content. Archetypes are highly developed elements of the collective unconscious which can only be inferred indirectly from stories, art, myths, fairytales, religions, or dreams.

Archetypes are universal organizing themes or patterns that appear regardless of space, time, or person. Appearing in all existential realms and at all levels of systematic recursion, they are organized as themes in the unus mundus, which Jung described as “the potential world outside of time,” and are detectable through synchronicities." Jung conceived of them as psycho-physical patterns existing in the universe, given specific expression by human consciousness and culture.

[SOURCE]

Artist bio

Photo of artist Dawn RobertsVanitas presents the photographs of Dawn Roberts Anderson from the exhibit Werkstatt, held at the UNB Art Centre in 2005. Werkstatt or “workshop” was a series designed to showcase the work of emerging artists providing an opportunity to exhibit a body of work in a variety of stages of development. The photos for this exhibit are from Imago, her experimental photographic series on archetypes. Dawn Roberts Anderson received a Diploma in Fine Craft Photography from NBCCD and graduated with a BAA in Film Studies from the University of New Brunswick in 2002 where she graduated with Honours. She received a BFA in film, photography and feminist studies from NSCADU in 2005. She was the recipient of the Governor General’s Award for the Highest GPA, the George Fry Excellence in Design Award, the Short Film Venture Grant and the Millennium Scholarship in 2002.

Her photography, film and installation work has been featured in Broken Pencil, Women Making Waves Film Conference, Venus Envy, UNB Art Center, NetPorn Amsterdam Expo, Moncton Art Gallery, Tidal Wave Film Festival, Center for Art Tapes, Anna Leonownes Gallery, Park Lane Theaters, A-Space Gallery, & Gallery Connexion. Her art photos have been sold to private and public collections.

She currently runs a successful web design and online marketing business from home and is also the editor of an online Sex Education Ezine. Dawn lives in Port Saxon, NS, by the sea with her partner Chris, their fur-baby Whiskey Roo, 5 chickens, and 1 rooster named Cornelius.

To learn more about Dawn Roberts, please visit her website: http://fatalefemmes.com/#

Interview with the artist

List of works

Trinity, 2005
83.1 X 50.7 cm
Digital Print

Persona, 2005
83.1 X 50.7 cm
Digital Print

Dichotomy, 2005
83.1 X 50.7 cm
Digital Print

Chrysalis, 2005
83.1 X 50.7 cm
Digital Print

Quote: Jung, Carl. The Collected Works of C.G. Jung, Volume 9 (Part 1): Archetypes and the Collective Unconscious. Princeton University Press:1980.

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