Stefanie Hunt-Kennedy

Associate Professor

PhD

History

Tilley Hall 115

Fredericton

hunt.kennedy@unb.ca
1 506 447 3484



Other titles

Director of Major and Minors

  • Fields of interest: The Caribbean and the Atlantic World; Slavery and Emancipation; Disability History; African Diaspora; Histories of Race
  • Period: Early Modern; Modern
  • Geography: Atlantic; Caribbean; Global/International; Latin America
  • Thematic: Comparative; Cultural; Empires and Colonialism; Intellectual; Political; Race and Ethnicity

Stefanie Hunt-Kennedy’s scholarship brings together critical disability, feminist theory, and critical race studies to examine the constitutive relationship between disability, slavery, and anti-black racism in the Caribbean and the Afro-Atlantic World. She teaches courses in colonial and modern Caribbean history, slavery and emancipation in the Atlantic World, slave law, slave resistance and revolution, the African Diaspora, and various topics in Disability History.

Hunt-Kennedy is the author of Between Fitness and Death: Disability and Slavery in the Caribbean (University of Illinois Press, 2020), which is the first book-length study of Caribbean slavery to make disability its primary focus. Between Fitness and Death is part of a growing body of cutting-edge scholarship that places the history of the Atlantic World, in particular the enslaved people of the Americas, in conversation with the “new” disability history. It illustrates that slave trade and plantation slavery, specifically the sugar producing colonies of the British Caribbean, are the historical underpinnings of systematized and violent African diasporic impairment. Hunt-Kennedy has written a number of articles, book chapters, and book reviews including, “‘Had his nose cropt for being formerly runaway:’ Disability and the Bodies of Fugitive Slaves in the British Caribbean,” (Slavery & Abolition: A Journal of Slave and Post-Slave Studies, Vol. 41, Issue 2, June 2020), 212-233 and “The Haunting of Slavery: Colonialism and the Disabled Body in the Caribbean,” with Melanie J. Newton in Disability in the Global South: the Critical Handbook, eds. Shaun Grech and Karen Soldatic (New York: Springer Publishing Company, 2016), 379-391.

She is the primary investigator for The Slave Law Project, a long-term program of research that will provide worldwide access to the British Atlantic slave laws from earliest comprehensive codes to the laws that governed emancipation (1636-1838). Her next project will explore the connections between disability, old age, capitalism and slavery in the Caribbean Atlantic World.

Publications

Between Fitness and Death

Between Fitness and Death: Disability and Slavery in the Caribbean (University of Illinois Press, 2020).

“Silence, Violence, and the Archive of Slavery,” English Language Notes, forthcoming, 2020.

“Disability, the Middle Passage, and the Plantation: Slavery-Induced Disability in the Eighteenth-Century Caribbean,” Disability Histories: Local, Global and Colonial Stories (ed. Esme Cleall) as part of the book series Routledge Research in Disability History, edited by Jane Buckingham (Routledge Press, forthcoming November 2020).

“‘Had his nose cropt for being formerly runaway:’ Disability and the Bodies of Fugitive Slaves in the British Caribbean,” (Slavery & Abolition: A Journal of Slave and Post-Slave Studies, Vol. 41, Issue 2, June 2020), 212-233.

“The Haunting of Slavery: Colonialism and the Disabled Body in the Caribbean,” with Melanie J. Newton in Disability in the Global South: the Critical Handbook, eds. Shaun Grech and Karen Soldatic (New York: Springer Publishing Company, 2016), 379-391.

“‘Let them be young and stoutly set in limbs:’ Race, Labor, and Disability in the British Atlantic World,” Social Identities Special Issue: Disability and Colonialism: (Dis)encounters and Anxious Intersectionalities 21, no. 1 (2015), 37-52.

Scholarly works in progress

The Slave Law Project (primary researcher of an online collection of slave laws in the Atlantic World). Anticipated launch date: September 2022.

Book reviews

Review of Hogarth, Rana A., Medicalizing Blackness: Making Racial Difference in the Atlantic World, 1780-1840. H-Disability, H-Net Reviews. May, 2018.

Review of Marisa Fuentes, Dispossessed Lives: Enslaved Women, Violence, and the Archive (University of Pennsylvania Press, 2016) in History: Review of New Books, Vol. 45, Iss. 4 (2017), 92-93.

Review of Andrea Stuart, Sugar in the Blood: A Family’s History of Slavery and Empire (New York: Alfred A. Knopf, 2013) in World Sugar History Newsletter No 44 (August, 2013), 2pp.