Kenneth Lerette   2008 Distinguished Service Award Recipient

Ken Lerette has been at UNBSJ since 1984, first as a lab technician in the Psychology Department, but in recent years as the Audio-Visual Consultant in the Integrated Technology Services unit, where he has distinguished himself as a creative, resourceful, energetic, and frequently tireless inventor of professional audio-visual systems and equipment that have benefited countless students and have helped this campus meet its educational goals.

Indeed, Ken designed, built, and installed the current generation of UNBSJ classroom control technology that allows instructors to easily and intuitively use the data projectors and the various audio and visual tools and equipment with which all of our classrooms are equipped. The consoles in the so-called ‘lite’ classrooms are the product of Ken’s inventive genius, which helped us greatly in the face of severely limited resources that meant comparable commercially available products were out of reach. These systems meet or exceed industry standards; in fact, their design is so innovative, yet straightforward, that they generated great interest when Ken described them at a session he led earlier this year on classroom technology at the Canadian Higher Education IT conference in Waterloo, Ontario.

Ken is now busy planning the next generation of UNBSJ classroom technology. In preparation for this, he designed, installed, and configured the new presentation suite in the library (WCL232), which is equipped with a data projector and automatic screen, a Smartboard, and a large LCD display with computer for use with small groups and video editing technology. The next phase of development in the room will be a modest video conferencing system, in anticipation of a larger video conferencing project in the New Year. Characteristically, Ken has enthusiastically and creatively begun planning the control systems, equipment, and layout necessary to make our classrooms the best equipped anywhere.

Dr. Merzik Kamel
Mathematical Sciences

2007