Global Site Navigation (use tab and down arrow)

Faculty of Law
UNB Fredericton

Back to First Year

Admissions categories 

There are three categories for admission to the first year of the Law program:

All eligible applicants are assessed in the regular category. Applicants may also request an assessment in the discretionary (diversity, a significant achievement, or disability) or Aboriginal categories. Applicants not selected in the discretionary or Aboriginal categories are assessed in the regular category provided they satisfy the minimum requirements.

Regular category

Eligibility

To be eligible for admission in the regular category, an applicant must meet the academic minimum requirements and provide a (i) personal statement; (ii) resumé; and (iii) official transcripts. Letters of reference, while not required, are useful when conducting Supplementary Review and determining eligibility for general scholarships.

Selection policies

Most offers of admission in the regular category are based solely on the applicant’s admissions index. However, because the number of similarly qualified applicants is invariably high, we conduct a supplementary review of many files. As a result of this process, applicants may be re-ranked taking into consideration additional factors relevant to potential academic performance in law and contribution to UNB Law and the legal profession. Among them are: coping with long-term physical or sensory impairment; learning English at a late age; extraordinary family responsibilities; multi-or bilingualism; post-graduate study; academic honours; scholarly publications and other evidence of superior writing skill; the nature and extent of employment; and extra-curricular and community activities. Personal statements, resumés, and letters of recommendation are read with care. Occasionally additional materials (such as samples of written work) are requested. 

The use of a regional preference in the selection process recognizes UNB Law’s ties to the Atlantic region. It is not intended to discourage national and international applicants. On the contrary, UNB consciously fosters diversity in its student body, including geographical and cultural diversity. A number of offers are reserved for residents of New Brunswick, Newfoundland and Labrador and Prince Edward Island. 

Scholarships 

Students submitting an application in the regular category are eligible for Special Application Entrance Scholarships & Awards. To apply students must complete the Special Scholarships Application in the Law Admissions Application Form.  

Discretionary category

Eligibility

In establishing this category, UNB Law seeks to increase access to legal education and the legal profession by persons who have limited academic credentials but distinctive and sustained life achievement. The goal is to enhance the opportunity for disadvantaged groups to acquire legal assistance from members of their own group and to increase the social and cultural diversity of the student body and the legal profession. However, discretion is exercised only where the applicant will likely succeed at the study of law. Applicants must apply in one or more of following sub-categories:  

  1. Diversity: Membership in a disadvantaged racial, cultural, linguistic or socio-economic group;
  2. Significant Achievement: Sustained and distinctive non-academic achievement in the paid workforce, at home (in any field of endeavor), or in the community; or 
  3. Disability: Coping with a physical or sensory impairment, or learning disability.

An applicant applying under one of the Discretionary sub-categories must provide: (i) a resumé; (ii) a statement relating the applicant’s personal circumstances to the selection criteria in the Discretionary category; and (iii) at least two letters of reference. We may request further documentation or additional materials.

Selection policies

All applicants in the discretionary category must write the Law School Admission Test (LSAT). Although there is no minimum LSAT score required for admission, students with an LSAT score below a 150 are unlikely to be admitted. An applicant in the Discretionary category who does not meet the ordinary requirements for post-secondary education must have the experience, maturity and outstanding qualities that indicate an ability to undertake the study of law successfully. Normally this will be shown by evidence of sustained and distinctive non-academic achievement.

Scholarships 

Students submitting an application in the discretionary category are eligible for Special Application Entrance Scholarships & Awards. To apply students must complete the Special Scholarships Application in the Law Admissions Application Form. 

Aboriginal category

Eligibility 

UNB Law seeks to further justice by improving access to legal education and the legal profession for Indian (status or non-status), Métis and Inuit persons; enhancing legal services to Indian, Métis and Inuit communities; and increasing the social and cultural diversity of the student body and the legal profession. The category is open to Métis, Inuit, and status and nonstatus Indians. Preference is given to residents of Canada. An applicant in this category must provide: (i) a resumé; (ii) a statement relating personal circumstances to the selection criteria for this category including connection to an aboriginal community; and (iii) at least two letters of reference. We may also request additional material.

Selection policies

All applicants in the Aboriginal category must write the Law School Admission Test (LSAT). Although there is no minimum LSAT score required for admission, students with an LSAT score below 150 are unlikely to be admitted. Applicants are assessed on the likelihood of successfully completing the Law program and the ways in which the applicant is likely to further the objectives of the aboriginal category.

An applicant in the Aboriginal category need not have a post-secondary academic education. Applicants who do not have three years or the equivalent of post-secondary education must demonstrate experience, maturity, and outstanding qualities that indicate an ability to undertake the study of law successfully. Completion of the Program of Legal Studies for Native People (PLSNP) at the University of Saskatchewan's Native Law Centre may be required for admission in the Aboriginal category, and students who successfully complete that program will receive credit for the first-year course in Property (Law 1200). Applicants lacking substantial university experience should apply to the University of Saskatchewan at the same time as applying to UNB. 

Scholarships 

Students submitting an application in the Aboriginal category are eligible for Special Application Entrance Scholarships & Awards. To apply students must complete the Special Scholarships Application in the Law Admissions Application Form.  Below are the special scholarships & and awards specific to the aboriginal category.

TAYLOR-STRAIN FAMILY SCHOLARSHIP

A renewable $2,500 scholarship is awarded to a student entering the first year of the JD program with a solid academic record and demonstrated financial need. It is funded by the Hon. Paul Taylor (LLB ’72), Justice of the Ontario Court of Justice and his wife, Gale Strain, a lifelong educator, who wish to assist students in financial need in their pursuit of a legal career. Preference is given to a student of Aboriginal, Métis or Inuit descent.