Course Descriptions

 

Psyc 6001 Statistics and Design I

This course focuses on (1) reviewing and elaborating on the principles of research design and research methods, and (2) providing instruction on conducting regression analyses. In particular, coverage includes research designs, handling data and psychometric evaluation, basic foundations of measurement theory, and simple and multiple regression analyses with assorted types of variables. Required course.  Prerequisite: none.  Credit: 3.0.

 

Psyc 6002 Statistics and Design II

This course covers research methods, designs, power issues, inferential statistics, and data interpretation relevant to categorical variables. Within this context, techniques such as Chi square, t-tests, Analysis of Variance (ANOVA), Analysis of Covariance (ANCOVA) are examined and a brief introduction to Multivariate ANOVA is provided. Between-subjects and within-subject designs are considered. Relevant SPSS applications will also be examined. Required course. Prerequisite: none. Credit: 3.0

 

Psyc 6003 Multivariate Statistics

Multivariate analyses examine the relations of multiple variables or sets of variables (e.g., multiple independent and/or dependent variables, repeated measurements of the same variable). The first part of the course will continue on from Psyc 6002, covering topics such as discriminant function analysis, survival analysis, and canonical correlation. The second part will introduce the structural equation modeling framework and specific techniques (e.g., factor analysis, path, and growth models). Overall, the course will emphasize conceptual understanding of these techniques: when they are appropriately applied, what they do, and how they are interpreted. Statistical software applications will be included. Students in the clinical program are required to take Psyc 6003 Multivariate Statistics or Psyc 6004 Qualitative Methods. Elective course.  Prerequisites: Psyc 6001, 6002. Credit: 3.0

 

Psyc 6004 Qualitative Research Methods

The aim of this course is to provide an introduction to the qualitative/social constructionist paradigm in psychology and to the use of qualitative methods in psychological research. The course focuses on qualitative methods involving collection and analysis of verbal/linguistic data (e.g., people’s accounts of their experiences and written records and documents). Specific methods discussed include interviewing and use of transcribed or printed texts. These methods are considered in conjunction with the analytic approaches of grounded theory and discourse analysis. Students will have the opportunity to carry out a qualitative analysis project with the aid of computer software designed for this purpose.  Elective course.  Prerequisite: none. Credit: 3.0

 

Psyc 6101 Ethical Standards for Psychologists

This seminar will examine ethical standards for psychologists involved in research, teaching, and applied work based on the most recent version of the Canadian Code of Ethics for Psychologists. The course uses a problem-based learning approach in which students research relevant issues and then use the ethical standards to resolve ethical dilemmas. Class meetings will involve little or no lecturing but much discussion, informed by research and the Code of Ethics. Required course. Prerequisite: none. Credit: 1.5

 

Psyc 6102 Professional and Ethical Issues in Clinical Psychology

This seminar introduces students to professional issues and practicum training settings affiliated with the clinical program. Topics covered include licensing requirements and examination in New Brunswick, by-laws of the College of Psychologists of New Brunswick, status and issues of professional psychology in Canada, the practice of clinical psychology, and advocacy and regulatory issues in the profession. Part of the seminar will involve site visits to various practicum settings around the province.  This will provide students with an orientation to practicum training opportunities and introduce them to potential practicum supervisors.  Required course. Prerequisite: Psyc 6101.  Credit: 1.5

 

Psyc 6202 Lifespan Psychopathology

This seminar provides an overview of theory and research on a broad range of psychological disorders and how they may present in clinical settings that serve children, adolescents, and adults. First, current conceptual frameworks and classification systems used to understand psychological disorders will be evaluated. Then the symptoms and DSM diagnostic criteria for specific disorders will be reviewed, with attention to similarities and differences in the presentation of disorders across development. Factors such as gender differences, etiology, and comorbidity will also be considered. Required course. Prerequisite: none. Credit: 3.0 

 

Psyc 6211 Assessment Skills with Children and Adolescents

The goal of this clinical skills course is to provide students with core knowledge and initial skills relevant to the psychological assessment of children and adolescents. Seminar topics include reviews of various assessment procedures and specific instruments used with children and youths (e.g., interviews, intelligence and academic skills tests, behavioural rating scales, self-report measures); and discussion of key issues (e.g., combining data from multiple sources) and ethical and professional situations that may arise during assessments. Students will also have an opportunity to acquire beginning skills in the administration, scoring, and interpretation of instruments often used with children and adolescents (e.g., the WISC, WIAT) and with report writing and providing feedback to clients. Required course.  Prerequisite: none.  Credit: 3.0. Estimated number of practicum hours: 10-15.

 

Psyc 6212 Assessment Skills with Adults

The goal of this clinical skills course is to provide students with core knowledge and fundamental skills relevant to evidence-based assessment of adults. Students will acquire skills in the administration, scoring, interpretation, report writing, and provision of feedback for tests related to adult intelligence, personality, and mental health (e.g., WAIS, NEO, PAI). Students will also become familiar with other selected tests of adult cognitive functioning, personality, and mental health. The current status of the intelligence concept and the role of intelligence testing in clinical assessment will also be examined, along with an appraisal of personality and mental health measures and their clinical uses. Required course. Prerequisite: none. Credit: 3.0. Estimated number of practicum hours: 10-15.

 

Psyc 6311 Therapy Skills with Adults

This skills course is designed to equip students with the basic interviewing and psychotherapy skills necessary to intervene with a variety of clinical problems. Students will develop interviewing skills using a micro-counselling approach involving instruction, modeling, and role-playing with feedback. They also will develop psychotherapy skills that can be employed across techniques. Students will implement these skills by conducting three 50-minute sessions with undergraduate volunteers in which they will define the problem, establish therapeutic goals, and make recommendations for intervention. Students also will learn about empirically-supported therapies used to address common psychological problems in adults (e.g., depression, personality disorders). Required course. Prerequisite: none. Credits: 3.0. Estimated number of practicum hours: 20.

                                                                                                                                                                               

Psyc 6312 Basic Therapy Skills with Children

This skills course will survey issues and procedures involved in the treatment of common child and adolescent emotional and behaviour problems. Students will develop basic interviewing skills needed for interactions with children ranging in age from early childhood to adolescence and with parents, teachers, and others who may affect change in a child. The focus will be on developing basic skills that can be employed across techniques. Students also will learn about empirically-supported therapies across a range of modalities (e.g., individual, family, group) that are used to address common problems (e.g., anxiety, depression, behaviour difficulties). The course may take various formats depending on the instructor, student enrolment, and availability of volunteers. Required course. Prerequisite: none. Credits: 3.0. Estimated number of practicum hours: 20.

 

Psyc 6405 Cognitive Behaviour Therapy

The aim of this clinical seminar is to provide students with an advanced, critical understanding of theory and research pertaining to cognitive behaviour therapy (CBT) for children, adolescents, and adults. Students will learn about the fundamental approach of CBT for assessing and treating a variety of disorders, adapting CBT for implementation across the lifespan, case formulation, and manualized therapy. Students are expected to be actively involved in discussion of assigned readings, library research on selected topics, and class presentations. Basic skills in CBT will be acquired through videotape demonstrations, role-plays, and peer-to-peer practice of specific therapeutic elements, such as cognitive restructuring and relaxation training. Required course. Prerequisites: Psyc 6202, Psyc 6311, and Psyc 6312. Credits: 3.0

 

Psyc 6406 Clinical Seminar: Special Topics I

The aim of this clinical seminar to provide students with an advanced, critical understanding of theory and research on selected topics relevant to the practice of clinical psychology. Topics will rotate depending on the expertise of the instructor. Where relevant and possible, a lifespan perspective will be adopted. Possible topics include, but are not limited to, working with families or groups, sexual problems, autism, health psychology, forensic issues, and neuropsychology. Students are expected to be actively involved in discussion of assigned readings and class presentations. Basic skills will be acquired through videotape demonstrations, role-plays, and peer-to-peer practice of specific assessment or therapeutic elements. Required course. Prerequisites: Psyc 6202, Psyc 6211, Psyc 6212, Psyc 6311, and Psyc 6312. Credits: 3.0

 

Psyc 6407 Clinical Seminar: Special Topics II

The course number will be used in conjunction with Psyc 6406 for clinical students who elect to take a second clinical seminar. Prerequisite: Psyc 6406. Credits: 3.0

 

Psyc 6408 Evidence-Based Practice

The aim of this seminar is to help students apply their clinical skills and knowledge to evidence-based practice. The course uses a problem-based learning approach in which students will research relevant issues in order to develop evidence-based assessment and diagnostic plans, case conceptualizations, and treatment plans for a variety of child, adolescent, and adult cases. Clinical cases will be designed to highlight a number of important concepts, including approaches to assessment and diagnosis, models of psychotherapy, and ethical decision-making. Issues related to individuals, couples, and families as well as gender and cultural sensitivity will be discussed. Required course. Prerequisite: Permission of the Director of Clinical Training. Credits: 3.0

 

Psyc 6519 Advanced Research Apprenticeship

Research experience and training is considered an integral part of graduate training in clinical psychology. Students who are admitted into the program with a Master’s degree from another institution are required to participate in an advanced research apprenticeship during their first year in the program, usually with their thesis supervisor. It is expected that students will be exposed to multiple aspects of the research process, including some combination of background reading, study design, data collection, data analysis, and manuscript preparation. Students will submit to the Clinical Program Committee by February 1 of their first year a brief description of their apprenticeship project (250-300 words) and a timeline for carrying out the specific activities associated with completing this project (e.g., ethics submission, data analysis). In late June (specific date TBA), students will make a 15-minute oral presentation of their apprenticeship project to clinical faculty and students. A written report of their project, in journal article format, is due to the supervisor the same day. The supervisor will normally assign credit (i.e., a letter grade) by June 30. In most cases, the student will collaborate with the supervisor on revisions to the apprenticeship report prior to submission for conference presentation and/or publication. Required course for students entering the program with a Master’s degree from another institution. Prerequisite: none. Credits 3.0

   

Psyc 6521 Master’s Research Apprenticeship

Research experience and training is considered an integral part of a graduate in clinical psychology. During the Master's year of the MA/PhD clinical program, all students are required to participate in a master's research apprenticeship with their thesis supervisor. The purpose of this apprenticeship is to familiarize the student with a body of research and to form a foundation for the Ph.D. Research Apprenticeship. The completed project will be a research proposal and will consist of a literature review, methods section and proposed analyses. Normally the timeline for completion will be as follows: May 15, students present their proposals to the department. June 15 final draft of the project is due. The final project will include: 1) an introduction section with literature review, research question(s) and hypotheses; 2) a method section with description of participants, procedure and planned analyses; and 3) a timeline for carrying out the specific activities associated with completing the study (e.g., commencement of data collection, data analysis, revision of manuscript). The CPC will review the timeline for feasibility. August 1, ethics submission due. Supervisors normally assign credit (i.e. a letter grade) for the apprenticeship after the ethics form has been submitted. Prerequisite: none. Credits: 3.0.

 

Psyc 6522 Ph.D. Research Apprenticeship

During their first year in the clinical Ph.D. program, all students are required to participate in a research apprenticeship under the supervision of their thesis supervisor. Students will conduct, analyze, and write up an independent research study based on the Master’s Research Apprenticeship. They will submit a written report of their project, in a journal article format, to their supervisor for feedback and evaluation. The timeline for completion is as follows: Following ethics approval of the Master’s Research Apprenticeship in the Fall of their first Ph.D. year, students begin data collection. September 1 of their second Ph.D. year, the final project is due to the supervisor; students present their results to the department by mid-September. The supervisor will submit a grade of CR to the Director when the student has completed the apprenticeship requirements. Prerequisite: Psyc 6521. Credits: 3.0

 

Psyc 6523 Co-Teaching Apprenticeship

Teaching is often an important part of the role and duties of clinical psychologists and is especially relevant to those considering academic careers. Because of this, students have the option of completing a teaching apprenticeship under the supervision of a faculty member. The purpose of the teaching apprenticeship is to offer students a chance to acquire teaching skills within the context of a supervised experience. Students will typically co-teach a lower level undergraduate course (e.g., Introductory Psychology, one of the Foundations courses) with a faculty member. The availability of specific courses may vary from year to year depending on departmental resources. Optional course. Prerequisite: none. Credits: 3.0.

 

Psyc 6525 Clinical Comprehensive Examination

The purpose of the comprehensive examination is to provide students with an opportunity to demonstrate the integration of theory, practice, and evaluation in an applied or clinical context based on the scientist-practitioner framework. The aim is to contribute to and evaluate the student’s depth and breadth of preparation in the content, methodology, and theory of clinical psychology. The examination will evaluate students’ competencies in reference to the program’s values and principles. Students are also expected to demonstrate a broad and critical understanding of major trends and controversies in the field. The comprehensive examination is a closed book written exam completed on a single day in mid April. Students are referred to the Guidelines for the Clinical Ph.D. Comprehensive Examination in the Graduate Student Handbook for further details. Required course. Prerequisite: none. Credits: 3.0.

 

Psyc 6624 Predoctoral Clinical Internship

All clinical students are required to complete a 12-month full-time organized internship in a recognized psychological services unit under the supervision of a licensed psychologist. It is expected that internship supervision and training will follow the guidelines for internship accreditation of the Canadian Psychological Association. Normally students will apply for the internship during the fall term of their fourth year after completion of all courses and other program requirements. In addition, data collection and analysis for the thesis should be completed before starting the internship. On completion of the internship, the Director of Clinical Training will recommend that the student be given credit for the internship once notification has been received that the student has completed all internship requirements. Required course. Prerequisites: All clinical program requirements and data collection for the doctoral thesis. Credits: 0

 

Psyc 6631 Assessment Practicum                                                               

Students are required to complete a minimum of 250 practicum hours involved in assessment activities at the UNB Psychological Wellness Centre (PWC). These hours should be split approximately equally between activities that target child/adolescent clients and adult clients. Students will normally complete their adult assessment hours 1 day/week during the winter and the spring/summer terms of their first year. They will normally complete their child/adolescent assessment hours 1 day/week during the spring/summer term of their first year and the fall term of their second year. Group didactic seminars will be scheduled to cover special topics in assessment as relevant to the services provided at the PWC. Prerequisites: Psyc 6101, 6102, 6202, and 6212. Credits: 0 

Psyc 6632 Intervention Practicum

Students are required to complete a minimum of 250 practicum hours in intervention activities at the UNB Psychological Wellness Centre (PWC). These hours should be split approximately equally between activities that target child/adolescent clients and adult clients. Students will normally complete their adult intervention hours 1 day/week during the winter and the spring/summer terms of their second year. They will normally complete their child/adolescent intervention hours 1 day/week during the spring/summer term of their second year and the fall term of their third year. Group didactic seminars will be scheduled to cover special topics in intervention as relevant to the services provided at the PWC. Prerequisites: Psyc 6101, 6102, 6202, 6212, 6211, 6311, 6631. Credits: 0 

 

Psyc 6633 Clinical Supervision Practicum

Students are required to complete a minimum of 50 practicum hours providing supervision of junior practicum students at the UNB Psychological Wellness Centre (PWC). These supervision activities will, in turn, be supervised by the Director of the PWC. Students will normally complete their supervision hours 1 day/week during the spring/summer term of their second year. They will begin with providing supervision of assessment activities and will progress to supervising psychotherapy activities should time permit. Group didactic seminars will be scheduled to cover the theoretical models of clinical supervision. Prerequisites: Psyc 6101, 6102, 6202, 6212, 6211, 6311, 6312, and 6631. Credits: 0 

 

Psyc 6634 Advanced Clinical Practicum I

Students are required to complete a minimum of 400 practicum hours in a pre-authorized practicum setting of their choice. Psyc 6634 may be focused on child/adolescent and/or adult populations, but must be completed as a three to four month full-time clinical placement. The aim of this advanced practicum is to provide students with an opportunity to acquire clinical skills related to a specialized clinical problem or more advanced skills with a particular clinical population. This advanced practicum will normally be completed in the summer term of the third year. In order to be credited toward practicum hours, the necessary documentation must be submitted to the Practicum Coordinator. Please refer to the Practicum Policy Manual for further details. Prerequisites: Psyc 6631, 6632, 6633. Credits: 0 

 

Psyc 6635 Advanced Clinical Practicum II

Students have the option of completing a second advanced practicum in a pre-authorized setting. The aim of this second advanced practicum is to provide students with an opportunity to acquire additional clinical skills on a specialized clinical problem or more advanced skills with a particular clinical population. This practicum may be taken on either a full-time or a part-time basis as long as the student spends at least 250 hours in the selected practicum (i.e., setting or clinical rotation) and has not previously completed a practicum in the same setting. In order to be credited toward practicum hours, the necessary documentation must be submitted to the Practicum Coordinator. Please refer to the Practicum Policy Manual for further details. Prerequisites: Psyc 6634. Credits: 0 

 

Psyc 6998 Ph.D. Thesis

In accordance with regulations set out by the Graduate School, students register in Psyc 6998 in their first term of enrolment in the Ph.D. degree.  The dissertation proposal will be written under the guidance of a thesis advisor and supervisory committee. Once the proposal is acceptable to the dissertation committee, it will be presented to the department as a colloquium. Although the approval of the proposal rests solely with the supervisory committee, the student, supervisor and supervisory committee should take any comments or concerns expressed during the proposal colloquium into consideration. After receiving written notification of the acceptance of the dissertation proposal and completing the proposal colloquium, the student is expected to conduct the research. For students in the Clinical Program, the thesis often is written while the student is enrolled in the predoctoral clinical internship and the results are presented at an oral defense subsequent to completion of their year of clinical internship training.  Required.  Prerequisites: Completion of all course requirements  Credits: 0

 

Psyc 6997 Master’s Thesis (optional)

All students are admitted at the Master’s level in the first year.  At the end of the first year, students are evaluated on their academic performance (students in the Clinical Program also are evaluated on their clinical potential) and a recommendation is made on whether they are admitted to the doctoral program. Although the expectation is that all students will proceed into the doctoral program, occasionally a student may not be admitted into the Ph.D. program. Students who are not recommended to proceed into the doctoral program may be permitted to continue their training at the Master’s level. This will require that they complete a Master’s thesis. For these students, any research carried out in fulfillment of Psyc 6522 Research II may be considered toward fulfillment of the Master’s thesis.