Graduate Courses

2017-2018 | 2018-2019 

2017-2018 Courses

6100 - Research Methods and Bibliography: Approaches to Graduate Studies

Compulsory Pass/Fail course for all new graduate students

6 credit hours

Professor Stephen Schryer

W 2:00-4:00 pm

An introduction to graduate study at UNB.  The first term will consist of seminars on post-secondary teaching, research sources on campus (including those of the library, Internet, and the campus network), workshops on writing SSHRC applications, and strategies of dissertation research and publication (academic and creative).  The second term will consist of supervised research leading to a thesis proposal.  This course is taken in addition to the required 15 ch for thesis-based MA students, 21 ch for course-based MA students, and 15 ch for PhD students.


6123 - Creative Writing: Poetry

3 credit hours

Professor Sue Sinclair

WI: T 6:00-9:00 pm

A workshop designed to develop and improve skills with the elements of poetry, such as metaphor, rhythm, line break, syntax, the registers of diction, and sound pattern. The course will explore poetic form, ranging from free verse and narrative to structured verse such as the sonnet and glose. Attention will also be given to professional concerns, including the development of a distinctive voice and style, publication in journals, and the preparation of book manuscripts.


6125 - Creative Writing: Poetry

3 credit hours

Professor Sue Sinclair

WI: T 6:00-9:00 pm

This course is restricted to students in the PhD programme in English (Creative Writing) who have already taken English 6123 at the MA level. A workshop designed to develop and improve skills with the elements of poetry, such as metaphor, rhythm, line break, syntax, registers of diction, and sound pattern. The course will explore poetic forms, ranging from free verse to structured forms, such as the sonnet, sestina and glosa.

Attention will also be given to professional concerns, including publication in journals and the preparation of book manuscripts. Prerequisite English 6123.


6143 - Creative Writing: Prose

3 credit hours

Professor Mark Jarman

FA: W 6:00-9:00 pm

A course designed to develop skills in short fiction, with room for students interested in writing novellas or novels. Taught in a workshop format, with close attention to line-by-line editing and revision and some preparation for publication in markets such as literary quarterlies, higher circulation magazines, small presses and larger publishing houses.


6145 - Creative Writing: Prose

3 credit hours

Professor Mark Jarman

FA: W 6:00-9:00 pm

This course is restricted to students in the PhD programme in English (Creative Writing) who have already taken English 6143 at the MA level. A course designed to develop skills in short fiction, with room for students interested in writing novellas or novels. Taught in a workshop format, with close attention to line-by-line editing and revision and some preparation for publication in markets such as literary quarterlies, higher circulation magazines, small presses and larger publishing houses. Prerequisite English 6143


6183 - Creative Writing: Screenwriting

3 credit hours

Professor Rob Gray

FA: TH 6:00-9:00 pm

An exploration, through practical exercises, of the fundamental principles of writing for both the screen (film and television) and, to a lesser extent, new media, including interactive narrative.  Taught in a workshop format.


6185 - Creative Writing: Screenwriting

3 credit hours

Professor Rob Gray

FA: TH 6:00-9:00 pm

This course is restricted to students in the PhD programme in English (Creative Writing) who have already taken ENGL 6183 at the MA level. This workshop is designed to hone skills in writing for the screen (film and television) through the exploration of narrative forms and character psychology. Prerequisite English 6183.


6246 – Beauty in Early Modern English Literature

3 credit hours

Professor Edie Snook

FA: T 9:00 am-12:00 pm

This course will explore early modern literature by men and women that considers bodies and ideas of beauty. We will begin with texts that work with Petrarchan and neoplatonic notions of beauty, but the course will also include material practices for the creation of beauty through clothes, makeup, hair, and movement, as depicted in courtesy and conduct books, treatises on cosmetic use, medical recipes, and paintings.  By bringing these philosophical and material contexts to bear on the poetry, prose, and drama by some of the major writers of the early modern period in England, we will develop our understanding of the significance of male and female beauty to its literary culture. Particularly important will be the study of relationships between writers and their work, as well as questions of gender, race, class, colonialism, commerce, and governance.

Primary Texts: 

Aphra Behn, Oroonoko, ed. Janet Todd (Penguin, 2003); Elizabeth Cary, The Tragedy of Mariam, the Fair Queen of Jewry, ed. Stephanie Hodgson-Wright (Broadview Press, 2000); Margaret Cavendish, “Assaulted and Pursued Chastity,” in Natures Picture Drawn by Fancies Pencil (London, 1671); Margaret Cavendish, “Of Painting,” in Worlds Olio (London, 1655); John Collop, “To Aureola, or the yellow skin'd Lady; asking who could love a Fancy,” “On an Ethiopian Beauty,” “Of the Black Lady with Grey Eyes and White Teeth,” “The Praise of Thick and Short,” “To Dionysia the Plump Lady,” “On Monocula,” in Poesis Rediva (London, 1655); John Donne, “Elegy 2: The Anagram”; Edward Herbert, of Cherbury “The Brown Beauty” and “Sonnet of Black Beauty”; Aemelia Lanyer, Salve Deus Rex Judaeorum (London, 1611); Giovanni Lomazzo Paolo, “A Discourse of the Artificial Beauty of Women,” in A Treatise Containing the Arts of Curious Painting, trans. Richard Haydocke (Oxford, 1598); Hugh Platt, “Sweet Powders, Oyntments, Beauties, &c.,” in Delights for Ladies (London, 1602); William Shakespeare, “The Rape of Lucrece,” in The Complete Sonnets and Poems, ed. Colin Burrow (Oxford University Press, 2008); William Shakespeare, Sonnets, in The Complete Sonnets and Poems, ed. Colin Burrow (Oxford University Press, 2008); William Shakespeare, “Venus and Adonis,” The Complete Sonnets and Poems, ed. Colin Burrow (Oxford University Press, 2008); Song of Songs from King James Version of the Bible. 

Selected Readings from:

William Baldwin, The canticles or balades of Salomon, phraselyke declared in Englysh metres (London, 1549); Richard Brathwait, The English Gentlewoman (London 1631); Richard Brathwait, The English Gentleman (London, 1631); Baldassar Castiglione, Book of the Courtier; Jacques Du Bosc, The Accomplish’d Woman, trans. Walter Montague (London, 1655); John Milton, Paradise Lost, in The Complete Poems, ed. John Leonard (Penguin, 2004); Ovid, Metamorphoses; Petrarch, Canzoniere; Plato, The Symposium.

Secondary readings include literary criticism, feminist theories of the body, and histories of clothing, beards, hair, and concepts of beauty.



6443 - The Heritage of Horror: British Romanticism and the Gothic

3 credit hours

Professor Elizabeth Effinger

WI: W 2:00-5:00 pm

If horror, as Eugene Thacker recently suggests, is a way of thinking about the unthinkable world, what might it mean that our visions of horror continue to draw from the well of Romanticism? This course addresses a wide range of major and minor Gothic texts from the British Romantic period, and those in its wake. We will explore how Romantic aesthetics, especially concepts of the beautiful and the sublime, colour the Gothic, and vice versa, while also attending to the Gothic’s (mal)treatment of some of Romanticism’s signature ideas and ideals (cf. the imagination, sympathy, freedom). Both within and against Romanticism’s cultural and political backdrop, what we might call the Gothic “apparatus” emerges. For this is the period that witnesses not only the invention of new Gothic optical technologies (the Eidophusikon, Panorama, and Phantasmagoria), but also the organization of new sciences of the mind. We will consider how the Gothic, with its intense interest in psychic mechanisms, such as repression and identification, makes similar investments as psychoanalysis, a discipline that Joel Faflak argues begins in British Romantic literature. In addition to measuring the traffic between the Romantic and the Gothic, we will retrace the classic distinctions between terror and horror, the female and male gothic, and will consider if these categories have any remaining purchase. We will study a variety of genres (poetry, novels, drama, essays) as well as the visual representations of the Gothic through Blake’s designs for The Book of Urizen, and the art of Henry Fuseli, whose painting The Nightmare has remained an icon of horror since its first public exhibition in 1782. As part of our examination into the afterlives of a Gothic Romanticism, we will attend to contemporary writers, Kazuo Ishiguro and Shelley Jackson, who grow out of this Romantic heritage of horror, before concluding with Lars von Trier’s Melancholia (2011), a film that not only stages a Gothic end to the world, but the end of a Romantic worldview.

Primary readings: Horace Walpole, The Castle of Otranto (1764); Edmund Burke, Philosophical Enquiry into the Origin of our Ideas of the Sublime and the Beautiful (1757); William Blake, The Book of Urizen (1794); Anna Laetitia Barbauld and John Aiken, “On the Pleasure Derived from Objects of Terror” (1773); Kant, Critique of Judgment (“The Analytic of the Beautiful” and “The Analytic of the Sublime,” 1790); Ann Radcliffe, The Mysteries of Udolpho (1794), “On the Supernatural in Poetry” (1826); Matthew Lewis, The Monk (1795); Jane Austen, Northanger Abbey (1798; 1818); William Godwin, Fleetwood (1805); Mary Shelley, Frankenstein (1818); Percy Shelley, “The Triumph of Life”; The Cenci (1819); Shelley Jackson, Patchwork Girl (1995, hypertext); Kazuo Ishiguro, Never Let Me Go (2005); Melancholia (dir. Lars von Trier, 2011).

Secondary readings: Sigmund Freud, “The Uncanny”; “Mourning and Melancholia”; Beyond the Pleasure Principle. Selections from Peter Brooks, Reading for the Plot; Gothic Documents: A Sourcebook 1700-1820; Eugene Thacker, In the Dust of This Planet; David Collings, Monstrous Society; Michael Gamer, Romanticism and the Gothic; Peter Otto, Multiplying Worlds; Joel Faflak, Romantic Psychoanalysis; Tilottama Rajan, Romantic Narrative; Marshall Brown, The Gothic Text; Barbara Johnson, A Life with Mary Shelley; Steven Bruhm, Gothic Bodies.


6736 – Elizabeth Bishop, The Sublime, Vertigo, Sexual Identities

3 credit hours

Professor Ross Leckie

FA: TH 2:00-5:00 pm

Elizabeth Bishop suffered from occasional attacks of vertigo, but in her poetry vertiginous experiences and all forms of loss of visual perspective disembody the conversational speaking voice that suggests personal intimacy between “Elizabeth” and the reader. Vertigo represents a collapse of identity and an emptying out, even as it simultaneously wheels through a superfluity of identities. In her famous poem “In the Waiting Room,” when Bishop as a girl realizes that “I am an Elizabeth,” she finds herself in free fall, grasping at all the ways in which identity is constructed. The poem invites and has received feminist, queer, postcolonial, psychoanalytic, deconstructive, and all kinds of political readings. Identity is over determined.

The focus of this course will be on Bishop’s lesbian identities and the ways she remained both in and out of the closet, but it will examine sexual identity as expressed in the sublime. It is in Bishop’s exploration of the sublime that she finds the loss of perspective that causes panic or anxiety that exposes endless uncertainties of identity. Some time will be spent on ideologies of private and public, and how these express themselves in the personal poet and the American “official” poet.

Primary Works:

Bishop, Elizabeth.  Elizabeth Bishop: Poems and Prose

Selections from:  Butler, Judith.  Gender Troubles; Freud, Sigmund.  On Sexuality; Foucault, Michel.  The History of Sexuality; Kristeva, Julia.  Revolution in Poetic Language; Stewart, Susan.  On Longing


6694 – The Politics of Native North American Literature

3 credit hours

Professor Jennifer Andrews

WI: M 2:00-5:00 pm

This course examines the politics of identity as depicted by a range of Native North American authors, including Leslie Marmon Silko, Thomas King, Diane Glancy, Chrystos, Marie Annharte Baker, Wendy Rose, Sherman Alexie, Joseph Boyden, Tomson Highway, and Louise Halfe over the past five decades.  We will read poetry, novels, short stories and plays, in conjunction with secondary critical articles that address some of the central debates in the fields of “First Nations” and “Native American” literatures.  Part of our task will be to consider how those designations have been produced and reinforced by writers and/or critics, and what concepts of identity, whether political, social, cultural, or linguistic, have been used to classify or define Native literatures and authors.  Many of the authors included on the reading list have lived both on and off the reservation/reserve and explore this hybrid perspective in their works; some have status cards while others do not.  What do the texts we are reading reveal about Native life and the complexities of identifying oneself and others? In addition, the course will incorporate visual media, including photographs, paintings, sculptures, and drawings, by Native writers and artists and explore the ways in which the concept of genre is being reformulated in concert with questions of Native identity.  As an integral part of the class, we will also consider how questions of identity necessarily inflect the teaching of Native North American literatures.

The methods of evaluation for this course are designed to encourage the close reading of texts, active participation, and to provide graduate students with several opportunities to develop professional skills that are useful both within and beyond the academic world.  Those enrolled will have the chance to deliver a formal conference-style paper to the class and to produce an article-length, potentially publishable, essay.

Primary texts:

N. Scott Momaday—House Made of Dawn (1968); Maria Campbell—Halfbreed (1973); Leslie Marmon Silko—Storyteller (1981); Diana Glancy—The Closets of Heaven (1999); Chrystos—Not Vanishing (1988); Wendy Rose—Itch Like Crazy (2002); Marie Annharte Baker—Exercises in Lip Pointing (2003); Sherman Alexie—Indian Killer (1998); Thomas King—The Red Power Murders (2006); Daniel David Moses—Brebeuf’s Ghost (2000); Tomson Highway—Kiss of the Fur Queen (1999); Joseph Boyden—Through Black Spruce (2008); Louise Halfe—The Crooked Good (2009).

Secondary Readings:

Pauline Turner Strong and Barrik Van Winkle—“‘Indian Blood’: Reflections on the Reckoning and Refiguring of Native North American Identity” Cultural Anthropology 11.4 (1996): 547-576; Jeffrey R. Hanson—“Ethnicity and the Looking Glass: The Dialectics of National Indian Identity”  American Indian Quarterly 21.2 (1997): 195-208; Gerald Vizenor—“Native American Indian Identities: Autoinscriptions and the Cultures of Names”  Native Perspectives on Literature and History, ed. Alan R. Velie.  Norman: U of Oklahoma P, 1995.  117-126; Linda Tuhiwai Smith—Decolonizing Methodologies: Research and Indigenous Peoples.  London: Zed, 1999.  1-18; Gail Guthrie Valaskakis—Indian Country: Essays on Contemporary Native Culture.  Waterloo: Wilfred Laurier UP, 2005.  211-253; Elvira Pulitano—Toward a Native American Critical Theory.  Lincoln: U of Nebraska P, 2003.  1-17, 81-100; Jace Weaver, Craig S. Womack, and Robert Warrior.  American Literary Nationalism.  Albuquerque: U of New Mexico P, 2006.  xv-xxii, 1-50; Emma LaRocque—When the Other is Me: Native Resistance Discourse, 1850-1990.  Winnipeg: U of Manitoba P, 2010.  17-36; Chadwick Allen—Blood Narrative: Indigenous Identity in American Indian and Maori Literary and Activist Texts.  Durham: Duke UP, 2002.  160-193; Jo-Ann Episkenew—Taking Back Our Spirits: Indigenous Literature, Public Policy, and Healing.  Winnipeg: U of Manitoba P, 2009.  69-86; Jennifer Andrews—In the Belly of a Laughing God: Humour and Irony in Native Women’s Poetry.  Toronto: U of Toronto P, 2011.  182-219; Daniel Heath Justice—“Notes Towards a Theory of Anomaly.” GLQ: A Journal of Lesbian and Gay Studies 16.1-2 (2010): 207-242; Jerry Harp—“Claiming Faith: Border-Crossing Theology in the Writing of Diane Glancy.”  The Salt Companion to Diane Glancy. Ed. James Mackay.  London: Salt, 2010.  44-58; Marie Annharte Baker—“Medicine Lines: The Doctoring of Story and Self.”  Canadian Women’s Studies 14.2 (1994): 114-118; Louise Halfe—“Keynote Address: The Rolling Head’s ‘Grave’ Yard.”  Studies in Canadian Literature  31.1 (2006): 65-74; Janet Dean—“Violence of Collection: Indian Killer's Archives.” Studies in American Indian Literatures 20.3 (2008): 29-51. (available on-line through PROQUEST); Jennifer Andrews and Priscilla Walton—“Revisioning the Dick: Reading Thomas King’s Thumps DreadfulWater Mysteries” (circulated in class); Jennifer Henderson—“Gothicism, Catholicism, and Sexuality in Tomson Highway’s Kiss of the Fur Queen.”  Unsettled Remains: Canadian Literature and the Postcolonial Gothic.  Eds. Cynthia Sugars and Gerry Turcotte.  Waterloo: Wilfred Laurier Press, 2009.  175-204; Heather A. Howard and Craig Proulx—“Transformations and Continuities: An Introduction.”  Aboriginal Peoples in Canadian Cities: Transformations and Continuities.”  Eds.  Heather A. Howard and Craig Proulx.  Waterloo: Wilfred Laurier UP, 2011.  1-21. 



6847 – Fiction and Indian Diaspora

3 credit hours

Professor John Ball

WI: TH 9:00 am-12:00 pm

This course examines contemporary novels by writers with South Asian roots whose homes (present or past) and fictional terrains include India, Pakistan, Sri Lanka, Canada, the U.K., the U.S., Trinidad, and East Africa. Their work invites discussion of a host of stimulating issues: colonialism and postcolonialism, migration and exile, history and historiography, race and racism, acculturation and transculturation, politics and violence, gender and the body, globalization, and much more. The course will also give careful consideration the ways in which the concept of “diaspora” may be understood in a South Asian context and through the study of diasporic fictions and theories. In our discussions, we will consider a variety of critical, theoretical, and historical frameworks in which these works may be situated, as well as performing “close readings” and attending to formal literary dimensions.

Primary Texts (10 or 11 will be selected from among the following, possibly supplemented with new ones published by then):

R.K. Narayan, The Man-Eater of Malgudi (1961); V.S. Naipaul, A House for Mr Biswas (1961); Salman Rushdie, Midnight’s Children (1981) or Shame (1983); Anita Desai, Clear Light of Day (1980); Rohinton Mistry, Tales from Firozsha Baag (1986); Amitav Ghosh, The Shadow Lines (1988) or The Calcutta Chromosome (1996);  M.G. Vassanji, The Book of Secrets (1994); Hanif Kureishi, The Buddha of Suburbia (1990); Shani Mootoo, Cereus Blooms at Night (1996); Arundhati Roy, The God of Small Things (1997); Michael Ondaatje, Anil’s Ghost (2000); Bharati Muhkherjee, Desirable Daughters (2002); Jhumpa Lahiri, The Namesake (2003); Kiran Desai, The Inheritance of Loss (2006); Mohsin Hamid, The Reluctant Fundamentalist (2007); Aravind Adiga, The White Tiger (2008); Kamila Shamsie, Burnt Shadows (2009)


6105 - Directed Reading Course

3 credit hours

Various professors

Under exceptional circumstances, a student may be granted permission to take a directed reading course.  The student must prepare a proposal for a directed reading course, in consultation with the proposed instructor, and submit it for approval to the Graduate Committee at least one month prior to the term in which the course is to be taken. The Committee may decline to approve proposals or ask for revisions.  Such course proposals must follow these guidelines:

The student must find a faculty member willing to supervise the directed reading course. Faculty members will take on the directed reading course as an overload teaching assignment.

The proposal should provide the reading list and an outline of assignments, with the relative grade weighting for each. The student will write at least two substantial papers or one paper and a final examination.

The reading course must be sufficiently substantial to warrant a 3-ch weighting and be entirely different from the thesis or dissertation.

Only one student will be allowed to take the same reading course at a time.

Only one course of those required for the degree can be a directed reading course.

Such a course will consist of at least six meetings and twelve contact hours with the course supervisor.

If the directed reading course is interdisciplinary in nature, the supervisor will be a member of the GAU in English.

While students who have been accepted to the MA programme are encouraged to enquire with the Director of Graduate Studies about the possibility of undertaking a directed reading course, directed reading courses will not normally be approved for students who have not yet undertaken their first term of study.


6106 - Creative Writing: Studio Course

3 credit hours

Various professors

Studio courses are for the purpose of pursuing a well-defined writing project that lies beyond the writing undertaken in the creative writing workshops. The student must prepare a proposal for a studio course, in consultation with the proposed instructor, and submit it for approval to the Graduate Committee at least one month prior to the term in which the course is to be taken. The  Committee may decline to approve proposals or ask for revisions. Such course proposals must follow these guidelines:

The student must find a faculty member or instructor willing to supervise the writing project. Faculty members will take on the studio course as an overload teaching assignment.

The proposal should provide the reading list and an outline of assignments, with the relative grade weighting for each assignment. The student will write one major project, in addition to other relevant smaller assignments to be determined by the student and supervisor.

The course must be sufficiently substantial to warrant a 3-ch weighting and be entirely different from the creative writing thesis.

Only one or two students will be allowed to take the same studio course at a time.

Only one course of those required for the degree can be a studio course.

Regular meetings must be arranged. The course should include at least eight contact hours with the course supervisor.

A supervisor may be selected from the literary community outside the department as long as she or he is approved by the English Department. Possible supervisors include the department’s Honorary Research Associates and Professors Emeriti.

While students who have been accepted to the MA programme are encouraged to enquire with the Director of Creative Writing about the possibility of undertaking a studio course, studio courses will not normally be approved for students who have not yet undertaken their first term of study.


6994 - Advanced Research Project

Compulsory Pass/Fail course open only to students in the 12-month course-based academic MA

6 credit hours

Various professors

The course requirements are a conference paper and an article.  These two pieces of work will be based on one essay undertaken during the previous 10 months of course work.  The article should be 20-25 pages in length and should be striving to meet the standard of a scholarly article that could be published in a refereed journal.  It does not have to be submitted for publication.  The conference paper, based on the article, should be a good example of this oral form.  The paper does not have to be delivered at a conference, although students will have the opportunity to present their conference papers at an optional departmental symposium to be organized for late summer each year.


6999 - Teaching Apprenticeship

Compulsory Pass/Fail course for all second-year PhD students

3 credit hours

Various professors

All PhD students are normally required, as part of their course programme, to complete a teaching apprenticeship under the supervision and mentorship of a full-time faculty member. During the second year of the PhD, the apprentice is assigned to a section of ENGL 1000, a full-year, 6-ch undergraduate course taught by the faculty mentor in the fall term, during which the student will attend all classes and meet regularly with the mentor. In the meetings, the student will receive training and guidance on: course planning and curriculum design; preparing and delivering classes on literature and writing skills; preparing and grading essays, tests, and examinations; course administration; and the preparation of a professional teaching dossier (including a general philosophy of teaching). In the winter term the student will be employed to teach the second half of the ENGL 1000 section, including responsibility for grading. The faculty mentor will observe winter-term classes periodically in order to offer feedback, and will be available throughout the term for advice. Course credit is awarded upon successful completion of the specific course requirements as determined by the supervisor in conjunction with the student at the beginning of the fall term. Prerequisite: must have completed first year of PhD programme in English.


2018-2019

6100 - Research Methods and Bibliography: Approaches to Graduate Studies

[Compulsory Pass/Fail course for all new graduate students]

6 credit hours

Professor Stephen Schryer

An introduction to graduate study at UNB.  The first term will consist of seminars on post-secondary teaching, research sources on campus (including those of the library, Internet, and the campus network), workshops on writing SSHRC applications, and strategies of dissertation research and publication (academic and creative).  The second term will consist of supervised research leading to a thesis proposal.  This course is taken in addition to the required 18 ch for MA students and 15 ch for PhD students.


6123 - Creative Writing: Poetry

3 credit hours

Professor Sue Sinclair

A workshop designed to develop and improve skills with the elements of poetry, such as rhythm, line break, image, metaphor, syntax, the registers of diction, and sound pattern. The course will explore poetic forms ranging from free verse to experimental poetry to structured verse such as the sonnet and glosa. We will also look at poetry written collectively and at cross-genre poetry that intersects with media such as film and the graphic novel.

Attention will be given to the development of a distinctive voice, style and poetic philosophy, as well as to issues pertinent to the development of book-length manuscripts.  We will also address professional concerns, including the mechanics of submitting work for publication and the art of making a living as a writer.

Primary Texts:

Foreman, Gabe. “Should I Listen to This Ox?” toronto poetry vendors, 2012;  Lahey, Anita and Pauline Conley.  Clarence-the-Welder. 2016;   Murakami, Sachiko. Powell Street Manyway Renga; ---. Project Rebuild; Oliver, Mary.  A Poetry Handbook.  NY:  Mariner Books, 2001; Queyras, Sina, ed.  Open Field: 30 Contemporary Canadian Poets.  NY: Persea, 2005; Subscription to The Fiddlehead.

Secondary Texts:

Padgett, Ron (ed.). The Teachers & Writers Handbook of Poetic Forms. NY: Teachers & Writers Collaborative, 2000.


6125 - Creative Writing: Poetry

3 credit hours

Professor Sue Sinclair

This course is restricted to students in the PhD programme in English (Creative Writing) who have already taken English 6123 at the MA level. A workshop designed to develop and improve skills with the elements of poetry, such as metaphor, rhythm, line break, syntax, registers of diction, and sound pattern. The course will explore poetic forms, ranging from free verse to structured forms, such as the sonnet, sestina and glosa.

Attention will also be given to professional concerns, including publication in journals and the preparation of book manuscripts. Prerequisite English 6123.


6143 - Creative Writing: Prose

3 credit hours

Professor Mark Jarman

A course designed to develop skills in short fiction, with room for students interested in writing novellas or novels. Taught in a workshop format, with close attention to line-by-line editing and revision and some preparation for publication in markets such as literary quarterlies, higher circulation magazines, small presses and larger publishing houses.


6145 - Creative Writing: Prose

3 credit hours

Professor Mark Jarman

This course is restricted to students in the PhD programme in English (Creative Writing) who have already taken English 6143 at the MA level. A course designed to develop skills in short fiction, with room for students interested in writing novellas or novels. Taught in a workshop format, with close attention to line-by-line editing and revision and some preparation for publication in markets such as literary quarterlies, higher circulation magazines, small presses and larger publishing houses. Prerequisite English 6143.


6163 - Creative Writing: Playwriting

3 credit hours

Professor Len Falkenstein

Taught in a workshop format, this course will develop students’ skills in writing for the stage. Beginning with exercises in the scripting of dramatic action, monologues, and simple scenes, students will by the end of the class write a one act or full length play suitable for submission to an established theatre company or production at one of Canada’s many theatre festivals. Students will also learn about the market for plays in Canada and the various routes that new scripts may take towards production by either mainstream or alternative theatre companies.


6165 - Creative Writing: Playwriting

3 credit hours

Professor Len Falkenstein

This course is restricted to students in the PhD program in English (Creative Writing) who have already taken ENGL 6163 at the MA level. Taught in a workshop format, this course will develop students’ skills in writing for the stage. Beginning with exercises in the scripting of dramatic action, monologues, and simple scenes, students will by the end of the class write a one act or full length play suitable for submission to an established theatre company or production at one of Canada’s many theatre festivals. Students will also learn about the market for plays in Canada and the various routes that new scripts may take towards production by either mainstream or alternative theatre companies. Prerequisite English 6163.


6279 - Shakespeare and Ecology

3 credit hours

Professor Randall Martin

This seminar will explore Shakespeare’s representations of, and relationships to, early modern environmental practices and contemporary ecocriticism. This will involve distinguishing early modern ideas about the natural world, and the place of humans within it, from contemporary ones. Theoretically, these perspectives are associated with historicist and presentist approaches to Shakespeare. The former emphasises constructively the differences between ecological values and practices in Shakespeare’s time from our own. The latter uses present-day environmental discourses to contemporize Shakespeare’s original representations as ecocritical questions or problems.

Weekly readings and discussions will reflect these perspectives in at least three ways. First, they will explore human interactions with the natural world, either creative or destructive, which were characteristic of Shakespeare’s pre-industrial society.

Second, they will survey the radical changes in human knowledge about the earth and its creatures taking place in early modern England. Shakespeare was conscious of dislocations caused by land exploitation (e.g. parks and enclosures), war, and human domination of animals. His plays therefore present modern readers with moments that anticipate our own anxieties about environmental degradation and/or the proper treatment of animals (e.g. Perdita’s suspicions of flower hybridisation in The Winter’s Tale seem to presage current debates over genetic engineering, species “improvement”, and the creation of monocultures).

Third, modern critics have begun to appropriate Shakespeare’s plays to analogise contemporary problems or shifts in ecological thinking. Although there is little evidence to suggest that Shakespeare is our contemporary in terms of, say, environmental activism, recent biological and genetic discoveries have reinvested certain traditional concepts of natural order and human nature with fresh ecocritical urgency. To put this another way, ecocriticism expands the study of ecological relationships and exchanges according to modern criteria and need not be limited to green worlds or natural objects.

Our seminar will consider recent critics such as Gabriel Egan, who argues that current research about biospheres and habitats partially re-validates E.M.W. Tillyard’s unfashionable “Elizabethan World Picture” of micro- and macrocosmic correspondences (Green Shakespeare [2006]). Ulrich Beck’s theories of environmental risk (Risk Society: Towards a New Modernity [1992]) sem likewise applicable to calibrated “natural” disasters or material surpluses in several plays including Coriolanus.

Seminar assignments will consist of weekly one-page response papers, an oral presentation with a written follow-up, a research paper, and discussion participation.

Textbook:

Timothy Clark, The Cambridge Introduction to Literature and the Environment (2010)

Plays to be studied:

A Midsummer Night’s Dream, As You Like It, The Merry Wives of Windsor, 2 Henry IV, Coriolanus, Titus Andronicus, Antony and Cleopatra,  Hamlet, King Lear, Cymbeline, The Winter’s Tale, The Tempest.  


6288 – Milton on Gender and Imperialism

3 credit hours

Professor Edith Snook

The seventeenth century saw both unprecedented travel by Englishmen, to India, Africa, and the Americas and significant social conflicts on questions of gender.   These two major cultural concerns are woven throughout Milton’s Comus, Paradise Lost, and Samson Agonistes, and this course will ask questions about both.   We will develop our understanding of seventeenth-century imperialism, not only by reading contemporary analyses of imperialism and its history, but also through examining seventeenth-century accounts of English encounters with people in the Americas, Africa, and Asia. We will also pay particular attention to women writers who share Milton’s concern with gender roles, such as Elizabeth Cary and Aemelia Lanyer, and his interest in empire, such as Aphra Behn and Margaret Cavendish.  Taking an intersectional perspective that considers race, class, and gender,  the course will consider representations of the natural world (its commodifaction and how men and women structure their relationship to it), bodies and knowledge about them, religious conflict, and gendered and colonial violence.

Primary Texts: 

John Milton, Comus—A Masque at Ludlow Castle, Areopagitica, Observations Upon the Articles of Peace [selections]; Paradise Lost, and Samson Agonistes;  Hakluyt, Richard. Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques and Discoveries of the English Nation [selections]; Behn, Aphra, Oroonoko; Cary, Elizabeth, The Tragedy of Mariam; Lanyer, Aemelia, Salve Deus Rex Judaeorum; Cavendish, Margaret, Assaulted and Pursued Chastity. 


6424 – Against Life: Literature and Science in the Long Romantic Period

3 credit hours

Professor Elizabeth Effinger

This course examines the emergent sciences of geology (the earth), botany (the vegetable), and the strange directions taken by physiology, including vaccination and taxidermy (the animal) during the long Romantic period (c.1750-1850). The aim of this course is to ‘unthink’ the humanism often attributed to Romantic thought in order to reveal the prehistory of the posthumanities, the name of a humanities that accounts for the displacement both of the human at the centre of discourse, and of the corresponding divisions of self and other, mind and body, human and animal. These discourses of “fragilization” – our term for the knowledge practices that weaken, open, and render the human vulnerable to its nonhuman other – emerge onto the scene of what many geologists are now calling the Anthropocene, an epoch that begins at the start of the Industrial Revolution and that serves as the origin-point for our current level of anthropogenic global environmental change to the earth. By examining the literary, scientific, and philosophical writings what emerges – and this is the real objective of the course – is a more comprehensive portrait of the ways in which the human and a decidedly humanistic understanding of life in the long Romantic period were widely and complexly enmeshed with an “innumerable company” (to use Blake’s phrase) of nonhumans, including ether, rocks, plants, infusoria, and animals.                                                                     

Readings

Primary texts to be considered include Romantic encyclopaedias and dictionaries (Chambers, Rees, D’Alembert); the philosophical writings of Kant, Coleridge, Hegel, Schopenhauer, Erasmus Darwin; the scientific treatises of Davy, Goethe, Lavoisier, Bergman, Salsano, Oersted, Hutton, Galvani, and Jenner; the novels of Mary Shelley and Maria Edgeworth; poetry of Barbauld, Blake, Clare, Byron, Keats, Shelley, Smith, Wordsworth; and taxidermy treatises of Sarah Bowdich, Thomas Brown, William Swainson, Charles Waterton.

Secondary readings might include selections from Maureen McLane, Romanticism and the Human Sciences; Noel Jackson, Science and Sensation in Romantic Poetry; Noah Heringman, Romantic Rocks and Romantic Science; Jon Klancher, Transfiguring the Arts and Sciences; Sharon Ruston, Creating Romanticism; Robert Richards, The Romantic Conception of Life; Gavin Budge, Romanticism, Medicine and the Natural Supernatural; Denise Gigante, Life; Theresa Kelley, Clandestine Marriage; Catherine Rigby, Topographies of the Sacred; James Allard, Romanticism, Medicine and the Poet’s Body; Jacques Khalip, Anonymous Life; and Richard Holmes, The Age of Wonder.


6609 – Rethinking the Gothic in English-Canadian Literature

3 credit hours

Professor Jennifer Andrews

In his well-known satirical poem, aptly titled “Can. Lit., (1962)” Earle Birney argues that “[i]t’s only by our lack of ghosts that we’re [Canadians] are haunted.”  Paradoxically, Birney has subsequently stirred substantial debate over what specters continue to shape English-Canadian literature and more broadly, Canada as a nation.  While Birney has been read by some as literally suggesting that Canada is devoid of ghosts, the reality is that he is one in a long line of writers who recognizes the fundamentally ambivalent relationship between colonialism and haunting as manifested in our national literature and culture, ranging from poetry and short stories to drama, novels, paintings, and film.  This course explores and wrestles with critical work written over the last forty years that characterizes and label Canadian texts as “gothic,” ranging from Margot Northey, Northrop Frye, and Margaret Atwood, to recent work by Justin Edwards, Gerry Turcotte and Cynthia Sugars.  In particular, we will probe the benefits and liabilities of employing the “Gothic” label to describe the work of ethnic- and racial-minority writers and artists, especially those who identify as Indigenous and thus may see such terms as a colonial stamp of approval.  Moreover, there are a variety of regionally-focused texts that rely on what could be described as a Gothic viewpoint to convey a specific kind of atmosphere, which has led to the development of sub-categories of the Canadian Gothic including the “Southern Ontario Gothic” and the “Prairie Gothic”; our discussions will consider these relationships between the Gothic and place, paying particular attention to its significance to Atlantic Canadian literature.  As part of the class we will probe the possible usefulness of other related terminology in a distinctly Canadian context such as magic realism and the grotesque, and will explore how Canadian treatments of these concepts differ from those of American and even British writers and artists.

The methods of evaluation for this course are designed to encourage the close reading of texts, active participation, and to provide graduate students with several opportunities to develop professional skills that are useful both within and beyond the academic world.  Those enrolled will have the chance to deliver a formal conference-style paper to the class and to produce an article-length, potentially publishable essay.  The final grade will consist of a conference paper (30%), a final essay (40%), two response papers totaling 15% and 15% for active class participation.  Because this is a relatively recent field of study, there is ample opportunity to use the work you do in this class to apply to professional conferences and/or to publish an academic article.

Primary Texts may include:

Wacousta—John Richardson (Introduction by James Reaney, McClelland & Stewart, 2008); Settlers of the Marsh—Frederick Philip Grove (Introduction by Kristjana Gunnars, McClelland & Stewart, 2008); The Double Hook—Sheila Watson (Introduction by F.T. Flahiff, McClelland & Stewart, 2008); Sanctuary Line—Jane Urquhart (McClelland & Stewart, 2010); The Bishop’s Man—Linden MacIntyre (Vintage Canada, 2010); Dogs at the Perimeter—Madeline Thien (McClelland & Stewart, 2012); Blood Sports—Eden Robinson (Emblem Editions, 2007); Soucouyant: A Novel of Forgetting—David Chariandy (Arsenal, 2007); Perdita—Hilary Sharper (Sourcebook, 2013); The Journals of Susanna Moodie—Margaret Atwood & Charles Pachter  (Macfarlane Walter & Ross, 2000); Ghost Train—Paul Yee (Groundwood Books, 1996); The Momento—Christy-Ann Conlin (Doubleday, 2016); Through the Woods—Emily Carroll (Margaret K. Elderberry Books, 2014); The Mysteries—Robert McGill (McClelland and Stewart, 2004); The Night Wanderer: A Graphic Novel—Drew Hayden Taylor (Annick Press, 2013); Twenty-Six—Leo McKay Jr. (McClelland & Stewart, 2003).

Theoretical Frameworks:

Margot Northey--The Haunted Wilderness: The Gothic and Grotesque in Canadian Fiction (3-26); Cynthia Sugars—Canadian Gothic: Literature, History, and the Spectre of Self Invention (1-49); Justin Edwards—The Canadian Gothic (xi-xxxiv, 1-25); Marlene Goldman—DisPossession: Haunting in Canadian Fiction (3-35); Cynthia Sugars and Gerry Turcotte—Unsettled Remains (vii-xxxvi).          

Selected other secondary works assigned:

Michael Hurley—The Borders of Nightmare (156-201); Justin Edwards—Gothic Canada (48-66) (ERes); Marlene Goldman-- DisPossession: Haunting in Canadian Fiction (39-62); Shelley Kulperger—“Familiar Ghosts: Feminist Postcolonial Gothic in Canada” from Unsettled Remains (97-124); George E. Haggerty—“The Horrors of Catholicism: Religion and Sexuality in Gothic Fiction” in Catholic Figures, Queer Narratives, ed. Lowell Gallagher et al. (Palgrave, 2007): 33-56; Mair Rigby—“Queer Theory’s Debt to the Gothic” Gothic Studies 11.1 (2009): 46-57; Gerry Turcotte—“‘Horror Written on Their Skin’: Joy Kogawa’s Gothic Uncanny” from Unsettled Remains (75-96); Jennifer Andrews—“Rethinking the Canadian Gothic: Reading Eden Robinson’s Monkey Beach” from Unsettled Remains (205-228); Sneja Gnew—Haunted Nations (125-132; Steven Bruhm—“The Contemporary Gothic: Why We Need It” in The Cambridge Companion to Gothic Fiction, ed. Jerry Hogle (Cambridge UP, 2002): 259-276; Herb Wyile—Anne of Tim Hortons: Globalization and the Reshaping of Atlantic-Canadian Literature (55-85); Julia Round—Gothic in Comics and Graphic Novels (55-72).


6747- The American Political Novel

3 credit hours

Professor Stephen Schryer

This course charts the development of the American political novel since the 1960s, exploring how this form has been taken up by major writers like Norman Mailer, Saul Bellow, Toni Morrison, Thomas Pynchon, Joan Didion, Philip Roth, and Don DeLillo.  We will focus, in particular, on novels that explore the failed promise of welfare state liberalism after the presidency of Lyndon B. Johnson.  We will ask questions such as the following:  How have U.S. novelists imagined the institutions of the welfare state?  What fictional alternatives do they present to the bureaucratism of those institutions?  Do novelists who grew up during the New Deal Era (for instance, Mailer, and Bellow) approach the welfare state differently than those who grew up after World War II?  Why have post-1960s novelists had such a difficult time envisaging any connection between their own politics and that of the Democratic Party?  Is there any connection between the anti-statism of writers sympathetic with the New Left and of those sympathetic with the neoconservative right?

Primary Texts: 

Norman Mailer – The Armies of the Night; Thomas Pynchon – The Crying of Lot 49; Saul Bellow – Mr. Sammler’s Planet; Marge Piercy – Woman on the Edge of Time; Joan Didion – Democracy; Toni Morrison – Paradise; Philip Roth – American Pastoral; Don DeLillo – Underworld; Colson Whitehead – The Intuitionist; Dana Spiotta – Eat the Document

Secondary Texts:

Irving Howe – “The Idea of the Political Novel”; Frederic Jameson – Postmodernism, or the Cultural Logic of Late Capitalism; Students for a Democratic Society – “The Port Huron Statement”; Hannah Arendt – Excerpts from On Revolution; Irving Kristol – Excerpts from Two Cheers for Capitalism; Sean McCann and Michael Szalay – “Do You Believe in Magic?  Literary Thinking after the New Left”; Maria Farland – “Total System, Total Solution, Total Apocalypse: Sex Oppression, Systems of Property, and 1970s Women’s Liberation Fiction”; Amy Hungerford, Postmodern Belief: American Literature and Religion Since 1960


6848 – Space, Place and Identity in Postcolonial Literature

3 credit hours

Professor John Ball

In this study of novels from across the postcolonial world, we will read major writers from South Africa, Zimbabwe, Australia, Britain, India, and Trinidad, with connections in some cases to the US or Canada. We will pay special attention to the ways in which their texts engage thematically with the construction and representation, the negotiation and imagination of space, place, and related concepts such as land, nation, boundary, territory, migration, exile, home, dwelling, and especially identity. Our reading will reflect not only the geographic but also the temporal variety of postcolonial writing, with a mixture of historical novels and those set in contemporary times. In order to discover some of the many ways in which notions of space and place “ground” the political and literary dimensions of narrative, we will supplement our reading of fiction with short readings in postcolonial theory and cultural geography. Students will be responsible for two 15- to 20-minute class presentations, one short report on a critical reading, and a 15- to 20-page final paper.

Primary Texts (tentative):

Race, Power, and Crisis in Southern Africa: Nadine Gordimer. July’s People (1981); Yvonne Vera. Nehanda (1992)

British Settlement and the Intrusive Other in 18th- and 19th-Century Australia: Thomas Keneally. The Playmaker (1987); David Malouf. Remembering Babylon (1993); Kate Grenville. The Secret River (2006)

Mobility, Sexuality, Risk, and Coming of Age in the 1970s:  Tim Winton. Breath (2008); Hanif Kureishi. The Buddha of Suburbia (1990)

Lines of Narrative Connection in Transnational London: Zadie Smith. White Teeth (2000); Amitav Ghosh. The Shadow Lines (1988)

Imaginary Geographies, Speculative Histories, and Dystopian Violence:  Bernardine Evaristo. Blonde Roots (2008); Shani Mootoo. Cereus Blooms at Night (1996); J.M. Coetzee. Waiting for the Barbarians (1980)

Required Secondary Readings

Ashcroft, Bill, Gareth Griffiths, and Helen Tiffin. “Introduction.” The Empire Writes Back: Theory and Practice in Post-Colonial Literatures. 2nd ed. London and New York: Routledge, 2002. 1-13. eBook available via HIL.

Ball, John Clement. Imagining London: Postcolonial Fiction and the Transnational Metropolis. Toronto: U of Toronto P, 2004. eBook available via HIL. [This one is optional. See sections on Ghosh (211-21), Kureishi (226-36), and Smith (236-43).]

Brah, Avtar. “Diaspora, Border and Transnational Identities.” Cartographies of Diaspora: Contesting Identities. London: Routledge, 1996. 178-210. Print.

Brittan, Alice. “B-b-british Objects: Possession, Naming, and Translation in David Malouf's Remembering Babylon.” PMLA: Publications of the Modern Language Association of America 117.5 (Oct. 2002): 1158-71. Available electronically through HIL.

Carter, Paul. “Introduction: A Cake of Portable Soup.” The Road to Botany Bay: An Exploration of Landscape and History. Minneapolis: U of Minnesota P, 1987. eBook available via HIL.

Erritouni, Ali. “Apartheid Inequality and Postapartheid Utopia in Nadine Gordimer’s July’s People.” Research in African Literatures 37.4 (Winter 2006): 68-84. Available electronically through HIL.

Foucault, Michel. “Of Other Spaces.” [1967.] diacritics 16.1 (Spring 1986): 22-27. Available electronically through HIL and on open-access internet.

Gordimer, Nadine. “Living in the Interregnum.” 1982. Critical Fictions: The Politics of Imaginative Writing. Ed. Philomena Mariani. Seattle, Bay, 1991. 259-77. Print.

Hall, Stuart. “The Question of Cultural Identity.” Modernity: An Introduction to Modern Societies. Ed. Stuart Hall, David Held, Don Hubert, and Kenneth Thompson. Oxford; Blackwell, 1996. 595-34. Print.

Kelly, Peter. “Breath and the Truths of Youth At-Risk: Allegory and the Social Scientific Imagination.” Journal of Youth Studies 14.4 (2011): 431-447. Available electronically through HIL.

Kossew, Sue. “Voicing the ‘Great Australian Silence’: Kate Grenville’s Narrative of Settlement in The Secret River.” Journal of Commonwealth Literature 42.2 (June 2007): 7-18. Available electronically through HIL.

Mangwanda, Khombe. “Re-mapping the Colonial Space: Yvonne Vera’s Nehanda.” Sign and Taboo: Perspectives on the Poetic Fiction of Yvonne Vera. Ed. Robert Muponde and Mandi Taruvinga. Harare: Weaver; Oxford: James Currey, 2002. 141-54. Print.

Massey, Doreen. “A Global Sense of Place.” Space, Place, and Gender. Minneapolis: U of Minnesota P, 1993. 146-56. Print.

McLeod, John. “From ‘Commonwealth’ to ‘Postcolonial.’” Beginning Postcolonialism. Manchester: Manchester UP, 2000. 6-35. Print.

Moss, Laura. “The Politics of Everyday Hybridity: Zadie Smith’s White Teeth.” Wasafiri 18.39 (2003): 11-17. Available electronically through HIL.

Newman, Judie. “The Black Atlantic as Dystopia: Bernardine Evaristo’s Blonde Roots.” Comparative Literature Studies 49.2 (2012): 283-97. Available electronically through HIL.

Slemon, Stephen. “Unsettling the Empire: Resistance Theory for the Second World.” World Literature Written in English 30.2 (Autumn 1990): 30-41. Print.

Tuan, Yi-Fu. “Space and Place: Humanistic Perspective.” Human Geography: An Essential Anthology. Ed. John Agnew, David N. Livingstone, and Alisdair Rogers. Oxford: Blackwell, 1996. 444-57. Print.

Winton, Tim. [This one is optional: P.S. material at back of paperback edition of Breath, pp. 2-13.]


6926 – Cultural Studies and Commodity Culture

3 credit hours

Professor Ross Leckie

Literary studies has become increasingly interdisciplinary and scholars in all historical periods are looking at popular culture, material culture, and ideological and semiotic structures, both in their own terms and as they inform literary texts.  Don DeLilllo’s novel White Noise will be the case study for applying social theory being studied through the course.  This course will take a neo-Marxist approach in examining contemporary commodity culture and the commodity’s materialist signification.  The course will explore various classes of commodity, ranging from those most obviously intended to signify, such as clothing and cars, to those that seem more use oriented, such as plumbing supplies.  Commodities cannot be fully understood without understanding sites of exchange, including big box stores, the new mall, the old mall, downtown stores, etc.  Some attempts to examine sites of production will be made, though it is more difficult to get access.  There will be field trips!

Readings

DeLillo, Don.  White Noise;  Marx, Karl.  Capital, Vol. 1;  Hebdige, Dick.  Subculture, of the Meaning of Style; Hall, Stuart.  Representation: Cultural Representations and Signifying Practices; Gramsci, Antonio.  A Gramsci Reader: Selected Writings, 1916-1935; Landry, Donna, and Gerald Maclean.  Materialist Feminisms; Baudrillard, Jean.  Simulacra and Simulation; de Certeau, Michael.  The Practice of Everyday Life; Jameson, Fredric.  Postmodernism, or the Logic of Late Capitalism; Willis, Susan.  A Primer for Daily Life; Bermingham, Anne.  Landscape and Ideology; Hennessy, Rosemary.  Profit and Pleasure.

Course Requirements: Two presentations and an essay of 15-20 pages.


6105 - Directed Reading Course

3 credit hours

Various professors

Under exceptional circumstances, a student may be granted permission to take a directed reading course.  The student must prepare a proposal for a directed reading course, in consultation with the proposed instructor, and submit it for approval to the Graduate Committee at least one month prior to the term in which the course is to be taken. The Committee may decline to approve proposals or ask for revisions.  Such course proposals must follow these guidelines:

The student must find a faculty member willing to supervise the directed reading course. Faculty members will take on the directed reading course as an overload teaching assignment.

The proposal should provide the reading list and an outline of assignments, with the relative grade weighting for each. The student will write at least two substantial papers or one paper and a final examination.

The reading course must be sufficiently substantial to warrant a 3-ch weighting and be entirely different from the thesis or dissertation.

Only one student will be allowed to take the same reading course at a time.

Only one course of those required for the degree can be a directed reading course.

Such a course will consist of at least six meetings and twelve contact hours with the course supervisor.

If the directed reading course is interdisciplinary in nature, the supervisor will be a member of the GAU in English.

While students who have been accepted to the MA programme are encouraged to enquire with the Director of Graduate Studies about the possibility of undertaking a directed reading course, directed reading courses will not normally be approved for students who have not yet undertaken their first term of study.


6106 - Creative Writing: Studio Course

3 credit hours

Various professors

Studio courses are for the purpose of pursuing a well-defined writing project that lies beyond the writing undertaken in the creative writing workshops. The student must prepare a proposal for a studio course, in consultation with the proposed instructor, and submit it for approval to the Graduate Committee at least one month prior to the term in which the course is to be taken. The  Committee may decline to approve proposals or ask for revisions. Such course proposals must follow these guidelines:

The student must find a faculty member or instructor willing to supervise the writing project. Faculty members will take on the studio course as an overload teaching assignment.

The proposal should provide the reading list and an outline of assignments, with the relative grade weighting for each assignment. The student will write one major project, in addition to other relevant smaller assignments to be determined by the student and supervisor.

The course must be sufficiently substantial to warrant a 3-ch weighting and be entirely different from the creative writing thesis.

Only one or two students will be allowed to take the same studio course at a time.

Only one course of those required for the degree can be a studio course.

Regular meetings must be arranged. The course should include at least eight contact hours with the course supervisor.

A supervisor may be selected from the literary community outside the department as long as she or he is approved by the English Department. Possible supervisors include the department’s Honorary Research Associates and Professors Emeriti.

While students who have been accepted to the MA programme are encouraged to enquire with the Director of Creative Writing about the possibility of undertaking a studio course, studio courses will not normally be approved for students who have not yet undertaken their first term of study.


6994 - Advanced Research Project

Compulsory Pass/Fail course open only to students in the 12-month course-based academic MA

6 credit hours

Various professors

The course requirements are a conference paper and an article.  These two pieces of work will be based on one essay undertaken during the previous 10 months of course work.  The article should be 20-25 pages in length and should be striving to meet the standard of a scholarly article that could be published in a refereed journal.  It does not have to be submitted for publication.  The conference paper, based on the article, should be a good example of this oral form.  The paper does not have to be delivered at a conference, although students will have the opportunity to present their conference papers at an optional departmental symposium to be organized for late summer each year.


6999 - Teaching Apprenticeship

Compulsory Pass/Fail course for all second-year PhD students

3 credit hours

Various professors

All PhD students are normally required, as part of their course programme, to complete a teaching apprenticeship under the supervision and mentorship of a full-time faculty member. During the second year of the PhD, the apprentice is assigned to a section of ENGL 1000, a full-year, 6-ch undergraduate course taught by the faculty mentor in the fall term, during which the student will attend all classes and meet regularly with the mentor. In the meetings, the student will receive training and guidance on: course planning and curriculum design; preparing and delivering classes on literature and writing skills; preparing and grading essays, tests, and examinations; course administration; and the preparation of a professional teaching dossier (including a general philosophy of teaching). In the winter term the student will be employed to teach the second half of the ENGL 1000 section, including responsibility for grading. The faculty mentor will observe winter-term classes periodically in order to offer feedback, and will be available throughout the term for advice. Course credit is awarded upon successful completion of the specific course requirements as determined by the supervisor in conjunction with the student at the beginning of the fall term. Prerequisite: must have completed first year of PhD programme in English.