Dr Jacqueline Low

Jacqueline LowProfessor
B.A., M.A. (Concordia University), Ph.D. (McMaster University)

Dr. Jacqueline Low is a Full Professor and has been a member of the sociology faculty at UNB since July 1st 2001. Prior to her appointment at UNB, she served as a Lecturer in Health Studies at De Montfort University in Leicester, UK. She currently teaches courses on introductory sociology, sociology of the body, sociology of health, and social problems, as well as a graduate seminar in qualitative methods.


Research interests

Her areas of research specialization include health, health care and health policy; alternative and complementary therapy; chronic illness and disability; deviance and stigma management; sociology of the body; home care and home support; qualitative research methods; and symbolic interactionist theory.

Selected Publications

  • Thériault, L, and Low, J, Luke, A. (2013/2014). Negotiating the System: Social Workers in Home Support Assessment and Case Management in New Brunswick. Canadian Review of Social Policy/Revue canadienne de politique sociale, 70:65-77.
  • Low, J. and Bowden, G. (2013) The Chicago school diaspora: Epistemology and substance. McGill-Queens University Press.
  • Low, J. and Malacrida, C. (2013) Introduction: Embodied Action, Embodied Theory: Understanding the Body in Society. Societies 3(3):293-297; doi:10.3390/soc3030293, principle author.
  • Low, J. and Dupuis-Blanchard, S. (2013) From Zoomers to Geezerade: Representations of the Aging Body in Ageist and Consumerist Society. Societies 3(1):52-65, doi:10.3390/soc3010052.
  • Low, J, (2012) Unstructured and Semi-Structured Interviews in Health Research. In M. Saks and J. Allsop (Eds.) Researching health: Qualitative, quantitative and mixed methods, London: Sage Publications, 2nd Edition, Chapter 5, Pp. 87-105.
  • Low, J. (2012) Conflict or Concert? Extending the Simmelian Triad to Account for Positive Third Party Presence in Face-to-Face Interviews with People Living with Parkinson's Disease. Societies 2(3), 210-221, doi:10.3390/soc2030210.
  • Low, J. (2008). Structure, agency, and social reality in Blumerian symbolic interactionism: The influence of Georg Simmel. Symbolic Interaction, 31(3):325-343.
  • Low, J. and Thériault, L. (2008). Health promotion policy in Canada: Lessons forgotten, lessons still to learn. Health Promotion International, 23:200-206.
  • Low, J. (2007). Unstructured interviews and health research. In Saks, M. and Allsop, J. (Eds.) Researching Health, Sage Publications, Pp. 74-91.
  • Low, J. and Murray, K. (2006). Lay acquiescence to medical dominance: Reflections on the active citizenship thesis. Social Theory and Health, 4(2):109-127.
  • Low, J. (2006). Communication problems between researchers and informants with speech difficulties: Methodological and analytic issues. Field Methods, 18(2):153-171.
  • Low, J. (2005). Avoiding the other: A technique of stigma management among people who use alternative therapies. In D. Pawluch, W. Shaffir, and C. Miall (Eds.) Doing Ethnography: Researching Everyday Life, Toronto: Canadian Scholars’ Press.
  • Low, J. (2004). Using alternative therapies: A qualitative analysis. Toronto: Canadian Scholars’ Press.
  • Low, J. (2004) Managing safety and risk: The experiences of people with Parkinson’s disease who use alternative and complementary therapies. Health: An Interdisciplinary Journal for the Study of Health, Illness and Medicine, 8(4):445-463.
  • Low, J., Shelley, J., and O’Connor, M. (2000). Problematic success: An account of “top down” participatory action research with women with multiple sclerosis. Field Methods, 12(1):29-48.
  • Low, J. (1999). The concept of hardiness: Persistent problems, persistent appeal. Holistic Nursing Practice, 13(3):20-24.
  • Low, J. (1996). Negotiating identities, negotiating environments: An interpretation of the experiences of students with disabilities. Disability and Society, 11(2):235-248.

Supervision areas

Health, health care and health policy; alternative and complementary therapy; chronic illness and disability; deviance and stigma management; social problems; homecare/home support; sociology of the body; symbolic interactionist theory; and qualitative research methods.


Please contact me to discuss possible supervision for undergraduate, MA, and PhD research projects.

Office: Carleton Hall, Room 132

Email:  Please see UNB staff directory.

Tel: +1 (506) 458 7439

Fax: +1 (506) 453 4659

Personal Page: http://www2.unb.ca/~jlow