Faculty

Scott RonisScott Ronis

Name: Scott T. Ronis, Ph.D.

Title: Associate Professor, Director of Graduate Studies

Previous Degrees/Licensing/Training Obtained:

Ph.D. (Clinical Psychology) University of Missouri
M.A. (Clinical Psychology) University of Missouri
B.A. (Psychology, Spanish) Brandeis University
Licensure: Licensed Clinical Psychologist, New Brunswick (2010-present) and Virginia (2010-present)

My primary research interests focus on identifying the roles of individual and interpersonal factors on youth emotional and behavioural problems (e.g., juvenile delinquency, sexual offending). In particular, I am interested in understanding how youth problems are linked with family relationship patterns. Furthermore, consistent with a contextual/systemic perspective, my research examines the complex and multiple relationships between youth and the broader contexts in which they are embedded (e.g., family, peer, school, neighbourhood, mental health systems). The overarching goal is for my research to directly influence prevention and treatment services as well as assessment practices with often underrepresented and underserved populations.

My secondary research interests focus on understanding normative and atypical childhood and adolescent sexual experiences and how these might influence adolescent and early adulthood psychosocial adjustment. I am currently conducting studies on childhood sexual experiences as well as on family communication patterns in general and more specifically regarding sexuality. My goals are to provide health professionals and educators with information that can be used in making decisions about best sexual health practices and to educate families on recommended sexual communication strategies.

Personal website: http://www.scottronis.com/

Select Recent Publications:

Damashek, A. L., Borduin, C. M., & Ronis, S. T. (2014). The role of environmental hazard in mothers’ beliefs about appropriate supervision. Journal of Early Childhood Research, 12, 50-63. doi:10.1177/1476718X13498336

Ronis, S. T. (2014). The dark side of sex: Assault and harassment. In C. Pukall (Ed.), Human Sexuality: A Contemporary Introduction (pp. 417-445), Toronto, ON: Oxford University Press.

O’Sullivan, L. F., & Ronis, S. T. (2013). Sexual development in girls: “Normative” development and development of paraphilias and sexual offending behaviors. In D. S. Bromberg & W. T. O’Donohue (Eds.), Handbook of Child and Adolescent Sexuality: Developmental and Forensic Psychology (pp. 193-219). New York: Elsevier.

O’Sullivan, L. F., & Ronis, S. T. (2013). Virtual cheating hearts: Extradyadic and poaching interactions among adolescents with links to online sexual activities. Canadian Journal of Behavioural Science, 45, 175-184. doi:10.1037/a0031683

Ronis, S. T., & Borduin, C. M. (2013). Antisocial behavior trajectories of adolescents and emerging adults with histories of sexual aggression. Psychology of Violence, 3, 367-380. doi:10.1037/a0033597

Ronis, S. T., & LeBouthillier, D. M. (2013). University students’ attitudes toward purchasing condoms. Canadian Journal of Human Sexuality, 22, 86-94. doi:10.3138/CJHS.2013.2201

Borduin, C. M., & Ronis, S. T. (2012). Individual, family, peer, and academic characteristics of female violent juvenile offenders. Youth Violence and Juvenile Justice, 10, 385-399. doi:10.1177/1541204012440108

Ronis, S. T., & O’Sullivan, L. (2011). A longitudinal analysis of predictors of male and female adolescents’ transition to intimate sexual behavior. Journal of Adolescent Health, 49, 321-323. doi:10.1016/j.jadohealth.2010.12.010

Grants:

Co-Principal Investigator, “Barriers and Facilitators in Access to Child/Youth Mental Health Services: A Mixed Methods, Inter-sectorial Study in Atlantic Canada,” Canadian Institutes of Health Research; $2,363,683; 2013-18.

Principal Investigator, “Prevalence and Psychosocial Factors Associated with Childhood Sexual Experiences,” Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada; $225,013; 2012-16.

Principal Investigator, “Advancing Supports for Young Men in New Brunswick,” Human Resources and Skills Development Canada; $70,000; 2012-13.

Principal Investigator, “Verbal and Nonverbal Cues of Adolescents’ Family Interactions,” University of New Brunswick; $6,000; 2010-11.

Teaching:

Undergraduate courses: Systems of Psychotherapy (PSYC 3323), Family Processes (PSYC 3253), Psychology of Crime (PSYC 3343)

Graduate courses: Statistics and Design I (PSYC 6001), Therapy Skills with Children (PSYC 6312)

Contact Information:

Scott Ronis

Department of Psychology
University of New Brunswick

Keirstead Hall
38 Dineen Drive, Room 215
Fredericton, New Brunswick
Canada E3B 5A3

Tel. (506) 458-7804
Fax (506) 447-3063