News & Events

You can do it! Helping anxious students to perform and excel in differing classroom settings: Discussions of perseverance, teacher support, and socio-emotional learning.

Kathleen Hughes, PhD, from UNB Psychology Department will be presenting a talk titled "You can do it! Helping anxious students to perform and excel in differing classroom settings: Discussions of perseverance, teacher support, and socio-emotional learning. The talk will take place on February 3rd, 2017, at 3:30 pm in the Snodgrass Lounge (K105). All are welcome and encouraged to attend.

Learning environments place many demands on anxious students, both academic and social. Anxious students tend to become overwhelmed in the classroom environment and withdraw or disengage, which in turn may foster low achievement. Protective factors such as a positive classroom environment or supportive relationships with teachers may particularly benefit anxious students.

In addition, some highly anxious students may be particularly resilient. Two studies in will be discussed. The first study investigated the characteristics of highly anxious and highly achieving students drawing on the Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA) 2012 Canadian sample. Structural equation modeling was utilized to find support for the Self-System Model, indicating that among highly anxious students, more positive classroom environments predicted more positive attitudes and values towards math, which lead to more perseverance, and more math achievement.

The second and subsequent study examined social and emotional learning, anxiety, and engagement among undergraduate students in Fredericton. After student anxiety was statistically controlled, components of social and emotional learning (regulation, social competence, responsible decision making) were found to be unique predictors of student engagement. This indicates that fostering social and emotional strengths in students may be a possible strategy for improving engagement and achievement among highly anxious students.


Introduction to R Commander - A graphical interface for R

Friday January 13th, Dr. Daniel Voyer from UNB Psychology Department will be presenting a talk titled "Introduction to R Commander - A graphical interface for R" This is a great opportunity for anyone who is interested in using R in their research to watch a demonstration, and have their questions answered by someone who understands the system. This colloquium will present a brief introduction to one of the graphical interfaces available to make the R statistical package more accessible. Dr. Voyer will cover basic aspects such as installation and data entry. He will then move on to some basic and advanced analyses. 

The talk will take place at 3:30 in the Snodgrass Lounge (Keirstead Hall, Room 105). All are welcome and encouraged to attend.


The Role of Auditory Feedback in Fluent Speech

Dr. Nichole Scheerer from right here at the University of New Brunswick will be delivering a talk titled "The Role of Auditory Feedback in Fluent Speech." The talk will take place Friday, November 25, 2016, at 3:30PM in the Snodgrass Lounge (K105). All are welcome, and encouraged to attend. 

The Role of Auditory Feedback in Fluent Speech

Speech is arguably the most important form of human communication. Fluent speech production relies on auditory feedback for the planning, execution, and monitoring of speech movements. Auditory feedback is particularly important during the acquisition of speech, however, it has been suggested that over time speakers rely less on auditory feedback as they develop robust sensorimotor representations that allow speech motor commands to be executed in a feed forward manner. Over the past few years Dr. Scheerer has been working on research that examines vocal and neural responses to altered auditory feedback. These responses have provided valuable information about the factors that dictate the relative importance of auditory feedback for speech motor control. During this talk, Dr. Scheerer will discuss studies that have investigated the role of age, vocal variability, and the predictability of speech errors on the utilization of auditory feedback for speech motor control. She will also describe a new line of research she is developing that aims to explore whether abnormal development of the control of prosodic aspects of speech might contribute to social deficits witnessed in individuals with autism spectrum disorders


A Tale of Two Methods: Gustave Gilbert, Stanley Milgram & the ‘Mysterious Nazi Mind’ (1945-1965)

On Friday, October 28th Dr. Ian Nicholson from Saint Thomas University will be delivering a talk titled "A Tale of Two Methods: Gustave Gilbert, Stanley Milgram & the ‘Mysterious Nazi Mind’ (1945-1965)." The colloquium will take place at 3:30 in Keirstead Hall's Snodgrass lounge (Room 105). All are welcome and encouraged to attend.

Stanley’s Milgram’s research on “Obedience to Authority” is the most famous study in the history of American psychology. The study involved a broad cross of American society seemingly transformed from benign individuals into compliant drones capable of undertaking acts of extreme violence. Although Milgram’s work has been applied to a truly astonishing range of contexts its best known application is the one made by Milgram himself – the Holocaust. In the opening paragraph of the first publication, Milgram framed the obedience study as an explanation of the Holocaust, a connection that he continued to pursue - with considerable success - throughout his career.

Milgram’s extraordinary historical and contemporary celebrity as ‘the’ psychologist of Nazi atrocities stands in contrast to the relative obscurity of another American psychologist who studied the actions of real Nazis 15 years before the first results of the Obedience research were published - Gustave Gilbert (1911-1977). During the Second World War Gilbert was a German speaking intelligence officer in the U.S. Army  and the prison psychologist at the first Nuremberg war crimes trial in 1945-46. Like Milgram, Gilbert was fascinated by the psychology of mass murder and anxious to develop an understanding of the motivations of Nazi killers. In contrast to Milgram who never studied any actual Nazis firsthand, Gilbert came to know many of the most prominent members of the party very well. He spent hundreds of hours interviewing all of the prominent Nazis and developed a detailed understanding of the complex range of personal and political motivations that guided their actions throughout the war. Gilbert published the results of his qualitative research in two books Nuremberg Diary (1947) and the Psychology of Dictatorship (1950).

As an important figure at Nuremberg, Gilbert has much to recommend him as a psychologist of historical and intellectual significance. Surprisingly however, within psychology Gilbert has no profile. He does not typically feature in undergraduate texts nor is his work discussed in more specialized treatments of the psychology of Nazism or the Holocaust. In this paper, I suggest that Gilbert’s very obscurity provides a useful perspective on the dynamics of disciplinary renown and ‘celebrity’ in post war American psychology – that combination of elements that transform a psychologist from the ranks of ‘humble contributor’ to the status of disciplinary and cultural ‘star.’ Central to the story is a methodological issue that resonates into contemporary psychology. Though trained as an experimentalist, Gilbert became convinced of the value of qualitative research and he argued that Nazism could only be adequately explained in terms of historical and cultural specificity. Milgram championed an experimental, theatrical tradition and believed that one could create a ‘virtual Holocaust’ in the laboratory allowing viewers to see atrocities in action while easily generalizing to other situations.  In the conclusion to this talk, I comment on the merits of these two approaches in light of recent critical literature on the Milgram paradigm.


Attention to emotional information in depressed and depression-vulnerable individuals: New insights from eye gaze tracking

Dr. Christopher Sears, PhD, from the Department of Psychology at the University of Calgary, will be presenting a colloquium entitled,"Attention to emotional information in depressed and depression-vulnerable individuals: New insights from eye gaze tracking" The colloquium will take place on Friday, September 23rd  at 3:30 PM in Keirstead Hall's Snodgrass Lounge, Room 105. All are welcome and encouraged to attend!

Christopher Sears, Ph.D., is an alumnus of the University of New Brunswick; he graduated with his bachelor’s degree (honours) in Psychology. After which, he went on to earn his master’s and doctorate degrees in Experimental Psychology from the University of Western Ontario. Since his undergraduate years, Dr. Sears has researched attention. His body of research has explored how a variety of topics affect attention, such as body satisfaction, food addiction, depression, anxiety, and post-traumatic stress disorder – to name a few. Sears also has conducted research looking at bilingual individuals and individuals with dysphoria. 


A Geographer’s Perspective on Mental Health, Substance Use and Access to Services

Dr. Amanda K Slaunwhite, PhD, from the Department of Sociology at UNB, will be presenting a colloquium entitled,"A Geographer’s Perspective on Mental Health, Substance Use and Access to Services." The colloquium will take place this Friday, April 8th  at 3:30 PM in Keirstead Hall's Snodgrass Lounge, Room 105. All are welcome and encouraged to attend!

In the past decade there has been significant focus on reducing barriers to mental health and substance use treatment throughout Canada. In this presentation we will review completed and upcoming research that examines access and use of treatment services in British Columbia and New Brunswick with a focus on primary health care, rural and remote communities, spatial analysis, caregivers, and alcohol dependency and access to treatment.


When sex is painful: Interpersonal causes, consequences, and treatment

Dr. Natalie O. Rosen, PhD, from the Department of Psychology & Neuroscience at Dalhousie University , will be presenting a colloquium entitled, “When sex is painful: Interpersonal causes, consequences and treatment." The colloquium will take place on Friday, April 1st  at 3:30 PM in Keirstead Hall's Snodgrass Lounge, Room 105. All are welcome and encouraged to attend!

Genital and pelvic (“genito-pelvic”) pain adversely affects the quality of life, sexuality, and intimate relationships of affected women and their romantic partners. This common condition – as many as 20% of young women report regularly experiencing pain during intercourse – is frequently misdiagnosed, ignored, and experienced as shameful. Dr. Rosen’s presentation will review her program of research
focusing on the interpersonal aspects of genito-pelvic pain. She will summarize findings related to novel factors she has found to be associated with women’s pain and couples’ psychosexual wellbeing, such as partner responses to the pain, sexual motivation, intimacy, and communication. Finally, she will discuss how this research informed the development of the first cognitive-behavioural couple  herapy for genito-pelvic pain. She will present pilot findings detailing the efficacy and feasibility of this treatment.


The evolution of language and the (ir)relevance of primate communication

Friday, March 18th at 3:30 PM we are pleased to have the Dr. Drew Rendall, Dean of Graduate Studies at UNB, presenting a colloquium entitled, “The evolution of language and the (ir)relevance of primate communication." The colloquium will take place in Keirstead Hall's Snodgrass Lounge, Room 105. All are welcome and encouraged to attend!

The evolution of language is a longstanding problem that continues to invite fresh study, analysis, and speculation from a variety of perspectives. One perspective has been to adopt a comparative stance and seek the rudiments of key elements of language in the communication systems of other animal species, particularly closely related nonhuman primates. While sensible, in principle, I’ll argue this search has been focused in the wrong places (like the drunk fumbling in the dark searching the ground for his keys, not where they’re most likely to be but simply where the light is brightest) namely on high-level informational properties of language related to its intentionality, semantics and syntax. Several decades of research now points to the conclusion that, in these respects, primate communication is largely irrelevant. Does this then mean that, despite their phylogenetic proximity to us, primates are not really relevant to the problem of language evolution? I’ll answer, no… and promise to disambiguate that deliberately ambiguous answer. In the process, I’ll hope to make some broader points about the enterprise of theorizing, both in this field but also more generally, considering how the constructs we use, the explanatory metaphors we borrow, and (ironically, in this particular case) the language we adopt can steer the phenomena we study and aim to explain, as much as the reverse, potentially leading us to mistake purely theoretical entities for real ones.


Insider or outsider: Does it matter?

This month we are pleased to have the Harrison McCain Foundation Visiting Professor Dr. Chen-Fen (Yvonne) Chen, PhD, from the Department of Social Welfare at Chinese Culture University, Taiwan, presenting a colloquium entitled, “Insider or outsider: Does it matter? A study on the situations and policies affecting migrant care workers in Taiwan's long-term care system from an occupational segregation perspective." The colloquium will take place on Friday,  February 19th at 3:30 PM in Keirstead Hall's Snodgrass Lounge, Room 105. All are welcome and encouraged to attend!

A study on the situations and policies affecting migrant care workers in Taiwan’s long-term care system from an occupational segregation perspective.

As in many developed countries, Taiwan foreign care-givers now represent a readily available short-term labor force to help shoulder the responsibilities of older adult care. Based on a mixed-method approach using the occupational segregation theoretical framework, Dr. Chen will discuss Taiwan's dual labor market of long-term care (LTC). She will examine whether foreign care-givers provide additional LTC or have replaced some of Taiwanese care-givers. In this presentation, she will shed light on the status of Taiwan’s foreign care-workers and their influx into the secondary labor market. The discussion will focus on the necessity to document the changes and impacts associated with importing workers into the secondary labor market in order to develop concrete, effective LTC labor plans and retention policies.


Electromagnetic Explorations of the Ghost in the Machine

Dr. Pierre Jolicoeur from l' Universite de Montreal will be delivering a talk titled "Electromagnetic Explorations of the Ghost in the Machine". The colloquium will take place on Friday, November 27th at 3:00 in the Snodgrass lounge (K105). All are welcome and encouraged to attend.

The speed of human perception, attentional selection, and passage into memory is often impressively fast. Stimuli are seen, heard, or felt, understood, and used to guide motor responses often in less than one half of a second. Modern chronometric studies, which have revealed several fundamental functional properties of these mechanisms, are now complemented and extended by noninvasive measurements of electrical fields and/or magnetic fields produced by neuronal activity in the human brain. In this talk I will review research from my laboratory based on analyses of data from electroencephalography or magnetoencephalogaphy for the study of visual and auditor attention and memory. I will mainly present work looking at basic mechanisms of visual attention and visual short-term memory that examines effects of multitasking and task switching on spatial attention. I will briefly present some examples from the auditory domain. I will conclude the presentation with some recent explorations of basic attention mechanisms based on analyses of oscillatory brain activity derived from analytic wavelet transforms of the data.


Psychosocial Functioning of a Community Sample of High Functioning Individuals with Autism Spectrum Disorder

Dr. Barb D' Entremont, PhD, from the Department of Psychology here at UNB, will be presenting a colloquium entitled, “Psychosocial Functioning of a Community Sample of High Functioning Individuals with Autism Spectrum Disorder". The colloquium will take place on Friday, November 13th at 3:30 PM in Keirstead Hall's Snodgrass Lounge, Room 105. All are welcome and encouraged to attend!

Individuals with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) but without intellectual disabilities are frequently referred to as "high functioning" (i.e., HF-ASD).  Research has indicated that individuals with HF-ASD are not reaching their full potential in terms of psychosocial outcomes.  However, use of select clinical samples when reporting on adult outcomes limits our ability to generalize findings to community samples of individuals with HF-ASD.  Additional research suggests there is a large cohort of adults in the community who are undiagnosed, who meet diagnostic criteria for ASD, and who are as impaired in terms of psychosocial outcomes as those with a formal diagnosis (Stuart-Hamilton & Morgan, 2011); however, little is known about this undiagnosed group.  Finally, there is a lack of information on age trends in adulthood, including a scarcity of information on older adults and on gender differences within this population.  In this talk, I will present data from a group of adults with HF-ASD living in the community.  A number of outcome variables will be explored including education, employment, living arrangements, relationship experience, parental status, daily living skills and hobbies.  I will use this data to demonstrate that there is a subsample of individuals with HF-ASD living within the community who are doing fairly well despite having high levels of ASD symptomatology.


Damned if you do, damned if you don’t: Women’s accounts of feigning sexual pleasure

Dr. Monika Stelzl, PhD, from the Department of Psychology at Saint Thomas University, will be presenting a colloquium entitled, “Damned if you do, damned if you don’t: Women’s accounts of feigning sexual pleasure" this afternoon at 3:30PM in Keirstead Hall's Snodgrass Lounge, Room 105. All are welcome and encouraged to attend!

Feminist and critical sexual scholars, among others, have ascertained that most women feign or exaggerate sexual pleasure at least some of the time. However, the social meanings of this practice are not well understood. In this presentation, I will discuss research in this area that I have conducted in collaboration with Dr. Lafrance (St. Thomas University). In this research, we are examining women’s discourses of feigning sexual pleasure in the context of consensual sexual activities. In my talk, I will focus on the dilemma that was frequently evoked in women’s accounts of exaggerating sexual pleasure in heterosex encounters. On the one hand, participants talked about feigning sexual pleasure as being problematic in the sense of being “deceitful”, “dishonest”, and “mean”. On the other hand, however, women also explained that feigning sexual pleasure was something done in order to protect their male partners. These contrasting discursive constructions created a dilemma whereby feigning pleasure was situated as both ‘bad’ and ‘good’. I will discuss how this dilemma was addressed and negotiated in women’s accounts. The findings will be considered in the context of gender power relations and dominant discourses around sexuality.


Impacts of Workplace Bullying

Judith MacIntosh, RN, BN, MSc(N), PhD, from the Faculty of Nursing here at the University of New Brunswick will be presenting a colloquium, entitled, "Impacts of Workplace Bullying." The colloquium will take place on Friday, February 6th, at 3:30 p.m. in Keirstead Hall's Snodgrass Lounge, Room 105. All are welcome and encouraged to attend!

Workplace bullying is characterized by persistence and repetition; involves offensive, intimidating, unwelcome, or unwanted behaviors; and abuses power or control at work. Bullying can be physical, psychological, and sexual abuse, harassment, or threats occurring in the workplace or on the way to and from work. Bullying reflects disrespect, causes stress in workplaces, and limits productivity. Unresolved bullying usually escalates and it often influences workers’ intent to stay in that workplace.

Both men and women are bullied by other men and women. People are bullied by bosses, co-workers, workers they supervise, and clients. Bullying has negative effects on physical, mental, emotional, social, and financial health and on relationships and careers.

In this session, we will explore what workplace bullying is, its impacts on people and workplaces, and ways to manage it and promote respect at work.


The Neuropsychology of Stress: Brain systems for selecting the right response at the right time and place

Dr. Troy Harker, PhD, from the Department of Psychology here at the University of New Brunswick will be presenting a colloquium entitled, "Brain systems for selecting the right response at the right time and place." The colloquium will take place on Friday, January 30th, at 3:30 p.m. in Keirstead Hall's Snodgrass Lounge, Room 105. All are welcome and encouraged to attend!

Physical, emotional, and social health are all linked to developmental exposure to stress. In this colloquium, Dr. Harker will describe the foundational elements of his research program in neuropsychology and health psychology including the core story of early brain development as it relates to health outcomes later in life. Particular emphasis will be given to brain structures and functions that are activated to prepare an individual to effectively adapt and cope to perceived stressors, including the stress response and executive functioning (i.e. air traffic control) systems of the brain. Dr. Harker will also describe how these brain functions are studied in his research using neuropsychological and neurophysiological approaches, including preliminary research findings on neural mechanisms that are associated with various stages of information processing by the stress response and air traffic control systems in the brain.


There are Many Paths but None Lead Back to Normal - Hoping and Coping in the Aftermath of Cancer

Dr. Ryan Hamilton, PhD, from the Department of Psychology here at the University of New Brunswick will be presenting a colloquium entitled, "There are Many Paths but None Lead Back to Normal - Hoping and Coping in the Aftermath of Cancer." The colloquium will take place on Friday, January 16th, at 3:30 p.m. in Keirstead Hall's Snodgrass Lounge, Room 105. Refreshments will be served. All are welcome and encouraged to attend!

This talk will explore Dr. Hamilton's program of research in cancer survivorship. In particular, this presentation will focus on how hoping and coping are experienced and implemented throughout the cancer care continuum, with a specific emphasis on the time period following acute treatment. This overall theme will be illustrated by drawing on examples of Dr. Hamilton's work with young adult cancer survivors, breast cancer survivors experiencing arm morbidity, and parents of children with cancer. Finally, future directions for research and intervention will be presented. 


Feminist Liberation Psychology: Lessons in Asking Wicked Questions

Dr. Colleen MacQuarrie, PhD, from the Department of Psychology at the University of Prince Edward Island, will be presenting a colloquium entitled, “Feminist Liberation Psychology: Lessons in Asking Wicked Questions.” This colloquium is being co-sponsored by the Muriel McQueen Fergusson Centre for Family Violence Research. The colloquium will take place on Friday, November 28th at 3:30PM in Keirstead Hall's Snodgrass Lounge, Room 105.

Feminist Liberation Psychology (FLP) theorizes not only how oppressions are created and sustained, but also how power circulates within these various limit situations to impact upon us. Corollary theorizing emerges from this analysis of how to create sustained and authentic moments of transformation for people, our relationships, and our community in order to impact upon these systems of oppression. Central to FLP is a liberatory process of conscientization which involves raising critical consciousness through knowledge, reflection, action cycles; in so doing the inherent power dynamics can be understood and acted upon within the limit situation. Research using FLP involves engaging in conscientization cycles with a community of people often through community based participatory action research paradigms and in creating dynamic questions for change. I have termed these dynamic processes as asking wicked questions. Wicked questions address complex, multi causal problems that typically require some form of behaviour and policy change and for which the solutions will be deeply rooted within the power dynamics of the community. Using illustrations from my research into abortion access in an anti-choice province, I share insights from the community based participatory action project designed to address reproductive injustice in PEI.


It Doesn’t Have to Hurt: The role of Psychosocial Factors in Children’s Pain

Dr. Christine Chambers, PhD, from the Department of Pediatrics and Psychology & Neuroscience at Dalhousie University, will be presenting a colloquium entitled, “It Doesn't Have to Hurt: The Role of Psychosocial Factors in Children's Pain”

The colloquium will take place on Friday, October 17, at 2:30 p.m. in Keirstead Hall's Snodgrass Lounge, Room 105. Refreshments will be served. All are welcome and encouraged to attend!

Inadequately controlled pain with immediate and long-term deleterious consequences is a common and serious health issue in children. Pain is implicated in all pediatric disease and injury conditions and is associated with significant suffering. Children with chronic health conditions (e.g., arthritis) and disabilities are at an especially high risk for pain. In Canadian hospitals, children receive an average of six painful procedures per day, most often with inadequate pain management. This occurs in spite of knowledge that unmanaged pain results in increased morbidity, mortality, and costs due to delayed healing, and increased length of hospital stay. Untreated pain early in life affects brain development, is associated with health care avoidance, and negatively influences emotional and social functioning. However, only 2% of children with pain in Canada receive appropriate pain management. Two-thirds of children with pain continue to experience pain as adults. This presentation will provide an overview of the problem of pain in children and a summary of Dr. Chambers’ research program aimed at understanding the role of various developmental, psychological, and social factors in children’s pain. She will also share her recent experiences in the area of knowledge translation of evidence-based findings in the area of childhood pain, including a 2 min YouTube video for parents that has been viewed in over 100 countries around the world.  


Why do Compulsions Persist?

Dr. Christine Purdon, PhD, C. Psych, Department of Psychology, University of Waterloo will be presenting a colloquium entitled: "Why do Compulsions Persist?" Friday, September 19, 2014, at 1:30 pm in the Snodgrass Lounge, Keirstead Hall Room 105. Refreshments will be served.  All are welcome and encouraged to attend!

In the past two decades a substantial amount of research has been devoted to understanding why obsessions evoke the aversive emotional response that yields compulsive behaviour, with the assumption that the compulsion will simply become obsolete if the obsession is de-toxified. Surprisingly scant attention has actually been paid to the phenomenology of compulsions, nor why they persist, other than that they neutralize the aversive state the obsession evokes and this reduction in distress is reinforcing. This presentation will review recent developments in our understanding of the phenomenology and persistence of compulsions and the implications for case formulation and treatment.

Dr. Purdon will also be talking about her time as a psychology graduate student at UNB, and how she managed the transition from student to professional academic after graduation.

Jonathan Crary, Thomas Kuhn, and the Contest of Bright

Dr. Steven Turner, PhD, Professor (Retired), Department of History, University of New Brunswick will be presenting a colloquium entitled: "Jonathan Crary, Thomas Kuhn, and the Contest of Bright." Friday, April 4, 2014, at 3:30 pm in the Snodgrass Lounge, Keirstead Hall Room 105. Refreshments will be served.  All are welcome and encouraged to attend!

One of the most far-reaching scientific controversies of modern times was fought out in central Europe between 1860 and 1921 by the rival schools of physicist/physiologist Hermann von Helmholtz and his implacable rival Ewald Hering.  It centered on the nature of human visual response, including the origins of spatial perception, the neural mechanisms responsible for chromatic sensations, and the understanding of contrast, afterimages, and the sensations of brightness.  The dispute unfolded  in the aftermath of what art historian Jonathan Crary has described as the midcentury collapse of "veridical models of vision"  and the transition to a new understanding of vision as conditioned, subjective, contingent, and fallible.   The controversy hinged on deep epistemological questions:  What is the role of mind in visual perception?   What is the status of scientific knowledge-claims under the new dispensation of vision?  The positions staked out by the protagonists powerfully influenced subsequent philosophy of science, including the rise of European positivism, and ultimately the critical attacks upon late positivism by Thomas S. Kuhn in his notion of conceptual incommensurability.


Psychology and Marketing: Brand Transgressions and Implications for Consumer-Brand Relationships

Dr. Wonkyong Beth Lee, PhD, Assistant Professor, DAN Management at the University of Western Ontario will be presenting a colloquium entitled "Psychology and Marketing: Brand Transgressions and Implications for Consumer-Brand Relationships." Friday, March 14, 2014, at 3:30 pm in the Snodgrass Lounge, Keirstead Hall Room 105.  Refreshments will be served.  All are welcome and encouraged to attend!

Consumer psychology is often described as a happy marriage between psychology and marketing. According to the American Psychological Association, the goals of consumer psychology are to “describe, predict, influence, and/or explain consumer responses.” This talk will introduce how psychology is used and applied in marketing. More specifically, attitude and interpersonal relationship literature in psychology can help explain consumer-brand relationships. Consumers may form strong relationships with brands in much the same way they form interpersonal relationships. Like interpersonal relationships, consumers may undergo a difficult period with their brands due to brand transgressions, which are defined as violations of relationship norms. Brand transgressions generally produce damaging consequences. Consumers will have to make a decision facing brand transgression: Should they go or should they stay? This presentation will discuss research examining factors that may contribute to the decision consumers will make over brand transgression and introduces deliberate self-persuasion to the consumer-brand relationship literature. It was found that when people have strong brand relationships, they use self-directed, intentional attitude change, including tactics to reinterpret undesired elements of the brands and to inhibit undesired elements of the brands out of awareness.


"Damned if You Do, Damned if You Don’t”: Women’s Accounts of Feigning Sexual Pleasure - POSTPONED UNTIL 2014-2015

Dr. Monika Stelzl, Associate Professor in the Department of Psychology at Saint Thomas University will be presenting a colloquium entitled, “Damned if You Do, Damned if You Don’t”: Women’s Accounts of Feigning Sexual Pleasure. Friday, April 4, 2014, at 3:30 pm Snodgrass Lounge, Keirstead Hall Room 105.

Feminist and critical sexual scholars, among others, have ascertained that most women feign or exaggerate sexual pleasure at least some of the time. However, the social meanings of this practice are not well understood.  In this presentation, I will discuss research in this area that I have conducted in collaboration with Dr. Lafrance (St. Thomas University). In this research, we are examining women’s discourses of feigning sexual pleasure in the context of consensual sexual activities. In my talk, I will focus on the dilemma that was frequently evoked in women’s accounts of exaggerating sexual pleasure in heterosex encounters.  On the one hand, participants talked about feigning sexual pleasure as being problematic in the sense of being “deceitful”, “dishonest”, and “mean”.  On the other hand, however, women also explained that feigning sexual pleasure was something done in order to protect their male partners.  These contrasting discursive constructions created a dilemma whereby feigning pleasure was situated as both ‘bad’ and ‘good’.  I will discuss how this dilemma was addressed and negotiated in women’s accounts.  The findings will be considered in the context of gender power relations and dominant discourses around sexuality.


"Look Good. Feel Great!": Understanding Adolescents’ Tanning Behaviours and Reasons

Dr. Suzanne Prior, Associate Professor in the Department of Psychology at Saint Thomas University, will be presenting a colloquium entitled, “Look Good. Feel Great!”: Understanding Adolescents’ Tanning Behaviours and Reasons. February 21 at 3:30 in Keirstead Hall's Snodgrass Lounge, room 105.

The World Health Organization has classified ultraviolet radiation (UVR) from the sun and artificial tanning devices as a group 1 carcinogen. This means that there is sufficient evidence that UVR causes cancer, including cutaneous malignant melanoma (CMM), as well as basal and squamous cell carcinomas. In 2014, it is predicted that 80,000 Canadians will be diagnosed with one of the three types of skin cancer, and this prevalence is expected to increase by 1.4% yearly. The highest rates are found among young women, with CMM responsible for the most cancer-associated deaths in women between the ages of 25 and 30. Research suggests that young adults engage in deliberate UVR exposure for appearance reasons and that the link between body image motives and reasons for tanning is well established by young adulthood. Increasingly, studies are focusing on adolescents in order to understand the origins of this link, as well as the prevalence of UVR-exposure behaviours in this age group. Suzanne Prior will report on her program of research that explores adolescents’ tanning, particularly their reasons for tanning and how these relate to self-objectification, the internalization of media ideals, and body image motives. This research played an important role in recent provincial legislation that bans underage tanning in a commercial tanning operation.


The Air Traffic Control System in Your Brain: A Neuropsychological Perspective on the Relationships Between Stress and Health - POSTPONED UNTIL 2014-2015

Dr. Troy Harker, Assistant Professor in the Department of Psychology at UNB, will be presenting a colloquium entitled, “The air traffic control system in your brain: A neuropsychological perspective on the relationships between stress and health”.

The colloquium will take place next Friday, January 17, at 3:30 p.m. (assuming there is no work stoppage) in Keirstead Hall's Snodgrass Lounge, Room 105. Refreshments will be served. All are welcome and encouraged to attend!

 In the core story of early brain development, the “air traffic control” system (i.e. Executive Functioning) in the brain works to manage stress by regulating the flow of incoming information with the appropriate outgoing response much the same way as air traffic control at a busy airport monitors and regulates the flow of arriving and departing planes. The air traffic control system works together with the stress response system of the brain. When stressful situations, events, or problems (i.e., stressors) activate these brain systems, the brain initiates a series of neurophysiological, cognitive, emotional, and behavioral responses that prepare the body to effectively adapt and cope with the perceived stress. One of the primary roles of the “air traffic control” system is to select and carry out the most efficient and appropriate response to a stressor and ensures that the response is carried out at the right time and place. However, exposure to negative and toxic stressors can lead to changes in brain architecture in the neural pathways that support this system. Behaviorally, these changes result in less adaptive coping and problem solving that, left unbuffered, can lead to problems with physical and emotional health (e.g., anxiety, depression, and/or addictions, obesity).  In the brain, neurons (brain cells) use electrical signals to communicate information along neural pathways. These biologically-based events can be measured using cognitive event-related potential recordings. The core story of early brain development and the role it plays in the subsequent functioning of the stress response and “air traffic control” systems in the brain will be discussed. In addition, preliminary findings examining the relationships between stress and the “air traffic control” system in the brain, as measured by cognitive ERP recordings, will be presented.


To include or not to include? Reverse-keyed items in construct measurement.

Dr. Chester Kam, of the Faculty of Education, University of Macau, will be presenting a colloquium entitled, “To include or not to include? Reverse-keyed items in construct measurement.”.  The colloquium will take place on Monday, Feb 3rd, at 2:30 in Keirstead Hall, Room 105.

Psychological researchers often bias towards a two-dimensional interpretation of a construct. In the case of self-esteem, for example, researchers often relied heavily on factor analysis and nomological network analysis and concluded that its regular-keyed items (e.g., I am a person of worth) are different from its reverse-keyed items (e.g., I am a failure). My presentation will demonstrate that such a research practice often leads to a misleading conclusion. I will show how the item valence (e.g., positive item content versus negative item content) can bias findings in favor of a two-dimensional interpretation. Finally, I will demonstrate that the exclusion of reverse-keyed items in construct measurement leads to a substantially biased research conclusion. A popular recommendation made by previous researchers on excluding reverse-keyed items should be taken with caution.


Authenticating Family: The process of re/claiming legitimacy by the lesbian headed stepfamily

Dr. Tracey Rickards, of the Faculty of Nursing at the University of New Brunswick, will be presenting a colloquium entitled, “Authenticating Family: The process of re/claiming legitimacy by the lesbian headed stepfamily”.  The colloquium will take place on Friday, Dec 6th, in Keirstead Hall, Room 105.

The theory of authenticating family demonstrates how women and their children incorporate another woman into their lives, maintaining and protecting the legitimacy of the new family structure. Transitions from being a heterosexual and/or single parented family to a lesbian headed stepfamily create multiple opportunities for challenges to their sense of legitimacy. The new stepfamily faces marginalization, stigmatization, and heteronormative assumptions that contest the sense of legitimacy for all family members. These families learn from multiple interactions among themselves and with outsiders about how to negotiate a new understanding of family. They develop the ability to demonstrate pride to a society that marginalizes, even as society is evolving in acceptance of multiple and diverse family configurations.

With a Little Help from My Friends: Understanding Adolescents’ Help Seeking from Specific Peers

Dr. Heather Sears, Professor of the Department of Psychology at the University of New Brunswick, will be presenting a colloquium entitled, “With a Little Help from My Friends”: Understanding Adolescents’ Help Seeking from Specific Peers.  The colloquium will take place on Friday, November 29th, in Keirstead Hall, Room 105.

With a Little Help from My Friends: Understanding Adolescents’ Help Seeking from Specific Peers

Adolescents frequently manage problems by seeking help from peers. Yet we know very little about their preference for this coping strategy. Do youths seek assistance from their female friends, male friends, and romantic partners at the same rate? What individual characteristics make it more likely that youths will turn to these peers for help? What qualities of their peer relationships promote help seeking? I will present results from three studies that address these questions and discuss similarities and differences in the patterns by gender.


Honours Conference 2013

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Applied Behaviour Analysis: The Places it Can Go

The psychology department at UNB Fredericton is pleased to announce that Holly Seniuk will present a colloquium entitled "Applied Behaviour Analysis: The Places it Can Go".

The colloquium will take place on Monday, April 15, at 2:30 p.m. in Keirstead Hall, Room 105. Refreshments will be served. All are welcome.

 


Exploring methods and findings from research with street youth in Canada and Guatemala

Dr. Jeff Karabanow, Professor of the School of Social Work at Dalhousie University, will be presenting a colloquium entitled, “Stories from the field: Exploring methods and findings from research with street youth in Canada and Guatemala”.
 
The colloquium will take place Friday, April 12, at 3:30 p.m. in Keirstead Hall's Snodgrass Lounge, Room 105. Refreshments will be served. All are welcome and encouraged to attend!
 
 
Stories from the field: Exploring methods and findings from research with street youth in Canada and Guatemala
 
The discussion will center around several of Dr. Karabanow's Canadian and Guatemalan research projects that have focused upon street youth experiences on and off the street. Key findings will be highlighted along with some discussion to the unique methodologies that have fused community based research with arts based productions.

Bio:

Dr. Jeff Karabanow is a professor of Social Work at Dalhousie University in the Faculty of Health Professions. He is also cross-appointed with International Development Studies, College of Sustainability and The School of Health and Human Performance. He has worked with homeless young people in Toronto, Montreal, Halifax, and Guatemala. He has published numerous academic articles about housing stability, service delivery systems, street health, and homeless youth culture. He has completed a film documentary looking at the plight of street youth in Guatemala City and several animated shorts on Canadian street youth culture. His most recent works include: a HRSDC-funded investigation concerning street youth and their engagement in formal and informal economies; a CMHC-funded report on young mothers’ supportive housing structure in Nova Scotia; a SSHRC-funded longitudinal study of young people’s sense of identity, community, and health once they are no longer homeless; a HRSDC study looking at rural-urban migration of Nova Scotian street youth; and a recently released book entitled Leaving the Streets: Stories of Canadian Youth, published in 2010 by Fernwood Publishing.

 


Sex Differences in Cognitive Abilities: New Data, New Theories, New Conclusions


Dr. Diane Halpern, McElwee Family Professor of Psychology and George Roberts Fellow at Claremont McKenna College, will be presenting a colloquium entitled, “Sex Differences in Cognitive Abilities: New Data, New Theories, New Conclusions”.
 
The colloquium will take place Tuesday, March 19, at 3:30 p.m. in Keirstead Hall's Snodgrass Lounge, Room 105 (This colloquium will be in addition to her Pacey Lecture the following day.). Refreshments will be served. All are welcome and encouraged to attend!


One of the most controversial topics in psychology is how, how much, and why females and males differ in some cognitive abilities. Surf through television channels, lurk on blogging sites, leaf through magazines, and peruse the scientific and scholarly journals--it won't be long before you come across a joke, an outrage, or a serious discussion about the similarities and differences between men and women. The topic is probably as old as humankind and as new as this morning's news. Yet, it continues to fascinate and confound us. The "truth" about cognitive sex differences is complicated, and although there are many similarities in the cognitive abilities of males and females, there are also differences that are very large, and have been replicated across time, cultures, and species. How can we make sense of the large and often contradictory data about cognitive sex differences, and even more importantly, how can we use these data appropriately and guard against their misuse in formulating public policies? In answering these questions, I will describe new data related to cognitive sex differences and provide a unique perspective on new theories designed to explain why females and males differ in their average performance on some, but not all, cognitive measures.


Colloquium: What can NVivo, a qualitative data analysis computer software package, do for me?

Dr. Lynne Gouliquer, Feb. 15 at 3:30 pm in Keirstead Hall's Snodgrass Lounge, Room 105.

NVivo is a computer program that helps in the analysis of many types of qualitative data including: interview transcripts, open-ended survey responses, literature reviews, audio/video recordings, pictures and web pages. It is applicable to many approaches (e.g., focus groups, in-depth interviews, content analysis, ethnography, & evaluation).  This presentation will introduce you to the basics of NVivo and its potential usefulness.

 


The Use of Scientific Inscriptions in Criminology and Criminal Justice Journals: An Analysis of Publication Trends between 1985 and 2009

Dr. Claire Goggin of the Department of Criminology and Criminal Justice at STU will present a colloquium entitled, "The Use of Scientific Inscriptions in Criminology and Criminal Justice Journals: An Analysis of Publication Trends between 1985 and 2009". 
 
The colloquium will take place Friday, January 11, at 3:30 p.m. in Keirstead Hall's Snodgrass Lounge, Room 105. Refreshments will be served. All are welcome and encouraged to attend!
 
The Use of Scientific Inscriptions in Criminology and Criminal Justice Journals: An Analysis of Publication Trends between 1985 and 2009
 
Existing research has documented a hierarchy among the sciences, distinguishing social sciences as “softer” than their physical counterparts.  Differences in data integration and analysis may underlie this distinction.  “Hard” sciences place more emphasis on non-inferential strategies (i.e., scientific inscriptions).  As a social science, criminology and criminal justice has struggled to integrate its principal constituencies: the analytical and experimental.  By consequence, its general research record has been hindered.  One means of addressing this limitation is to embrace the inscription techniques which “hard” sciences have used to good effect in cumulating knowledge.  To that end, the use of scientific inscriptions (i.e., graphs and tables) in 397 randomly-selected articles published between 1985 and 2009 in 16 Criminology and Criminal Justice journals was examined and compared with that of other scientific disciplines, both “hard” and “soft”.  Less than 10% of page space was devoted to data presentation (i.e., graphs plus tables) with no evidence of variation across the 25 year study period.  When compared with other sciences, inscription usage in criminology and criminal justice journals falls between psychology and sociology.  Researchers in the field are advised to increase their use of inscription techniques in order to bolster the impact of their research results.