News & Events Archives

2012
2011
2010
2009

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


2012


 

 Who Needs Help in School? A Meta-Analysis of Gender Differences in School Marks

The Psychology department at UNB Fredericton is very pleased to announce that Dr. Daniel Voyer of the Department of Psychology at UNB will present a colloquium entitled, "Who needs help in school? A meta-analysis of gender differences in school marks".

The colloquium will take place on Friday, November 9, at 3:30 p.m. in Keirstead Hall's Snodgrass Lounge, Room 105. Refreshments will be served. All are welcome and encouraged to attend!

A female advantage in school achievement is a fairly common finding in education research and it extends to most course subjects (e.g., language, math, science), unlike what is found on achievement tests. However, questions remain concerning whether there are actually such gender differences when the literature is examined comprehensively and what factors might moderate their magnitude.  The present meta-analysis answered these questions by examining published studies that included an evaluation of gender differences in school marks in elementary, junior/middle, high school, or at the university level (both undergraduate and graduate). The final analysis was based on 342 effect sizes drawn from 206 published studies. A multilevel approach to meta-analysis was used to handle the presence of non-independent effect sizes and to reflect the hierarchical structure of the data in the overall sample. This method was complemented with an examination of results in separate subject matters with conventional meta-analysis on independent effect sizes. A small but significant female advantage (estimated mean d = 0.193) was demonstrated for the overall sample of effect sizes. Noteworthy findings were that the female advantage was largest for language courses and smallest for math and science courses. Similarly, effects were largest in junior/middle school and smallest in graduate school. Nationality and the gender composition of samples also contributed to the heterogeneity of effect sizes. Implications for educational and psychological research are discussed. 

 


 Opening Pandora’s Box: Research and Clinical Implication of the Mental Control Paradox

Presenter:       David A. Clark

Date:               October 26, 2012

Distressing intrusive thoughts and images are a common symptom feature of many anxiety states, as well as some forms of depression.  Often individuals with anxiety and depression struggle to gain control over their unwanted troubling cognitions.  Despite their best efforts, clinical individuals’ attempts at mental control are ineffective at best and often counterproductive at worst.  Successful cognitive behavior therapy must address the problem of cognitive control in anxiety and depression.  Why are anxious individuals less effective than the non-anxious in their control of anxiotypic cognitions?   What are the most effective strategies cognitive behavior therapists should teach their anxious clients about cognitive control?  These are some of the questions that will be addressed in this presentation that critically reviews four decades of research into unwanted, repetitive intrusive thoughts.  I will examine research evidence on whether some types of negative cognitions are more difficult to control than others, whether there are personality or individual differences in mental control ability, and whether certain cognitive control strategies are more effective than others.  The role of cognitive appraisal will be discussed as well as the feasibility of acceptance-based responses.  The presentation will conclude with a consideration of clinical implications and directions for future research on unwanted intrusive cognitions.

 


 Voices of Peril, Pain, and Advocacy: Women's Stories of Living with Eating Issues

The Psychology department at UNB Fredericton is very pleased to announce that Kathryn Weaver, RN, PhD, Associate Professor in the Faculty of Nursing at UNB, will present a colloquium entitled, "Voices of Peril, Pain, and Advocacy: Women's Stories of Living with Eating Issues". 

The colloquium will take place on Friday, October 12, at 3:30 p.m. in Keirstead Hall's Snodgrass Lounge, Room 105. Refreshments will be served. All are welcome and encouraged to attend!

 Eating disorders – a leading cause of disability among women and particularly common in university settings – represent a significant health problem because of the associated morbidity, chronicity, mortality and high cost of treatment. Within a research program to explore the support and recovery needs and preferences of persons affected by eating disorders and eating issues, the perspectives of 232 New Brunswick women, 32 parents, 18 peer facilitators, and 20 allied healthcare professionals were examined using mixed methodologies and triangulated multi-sourced data (questionnaires, reflective interviews, video data, personal diaries, letters, drawings,  and original poetry). This presentation will focus on the stories of over 50 women who participated in qualitative interviews across a set of five individual projects motivated by practice need for therapeutic interventions with eating disordered sub-populations. The first study utilized feminist grounded theory method in developing a model of women’s recovery from anorexia nervosa by relinquishing the eating disorder which had served as their source of comfort and the means for negotiating difficult developmental and situational transitions. The second project provided a video dissemination of recovery based on focus group and individual interviews with women who experienced anorexia and bulimia nervosa. The third involved narrative analysis of unsolicited diaries and autobiographies received from women with instructions to “Please do something with this to help others.” The fourth and fifth studies involved thematic analysis of stories contained in interviews with female university students who were either (a) attending a campus-wide peer-facilitated psychoeducational intervention called “It’s Not about Food” or else (b) seeking social support through friends, family members and conventional service providers. It is critical that the voices of the women are shared so that others may feel a sense of connectedness with the women’s struggles and obtain a better understanding of the underlying events and experiences. Ultimately, this research aims to enhance public, professional and interdisciplinary sensitivities and knowledge.

 


  The Gendered Reality of Soldiering in Today’s Canadian Armed Forces

The Psychology department at UNB Fredericton is very pleased to announce that Dr. Lynne Gouliquer from the University of New Brunswick will present a colloquium entitled, "The Gendered Reality of Soldiering in Today’s Canadian Armed Forces."

The colloquium will take place on Friday, March 16, at 3:30 p.m in Keirstead Hall's Snodgrass Lounge, Room 105. Refreshments will be served. All are welcome and encouraged to attend!

The Gendered Reality of Soldiering in Today’s Canadian Armed Forces

Women have advanced in Canada since the Royal Commission on the Status of Women in 1970. This Commission made 167 recommendations to redress documented inequalities and inequities. Six pertained directly to the full integration of women in the Canadian Forces (CF). In 1989, a Canadian Human Rights Tribunal instructed the CF to “fully integrate” women. Removing these gender-specific barriers in the Canadian military signifies a major step toward equality. Few nations allow women unrestricted access to all military occupations. Since these legislative policies, the evidence indicates that the CF has been slow and unsuccessful to meet demands (Davis, 1994; Chapstick, Farley, Wild, & Parkes, 2005; O’Hara, 1998a, 1998b; Tanner, 1999). The present study examines the everyday soldiering experiences of Canadian female soldiers as a step toward an increased understanding of gender and the CF.

This research utilises both quantitative and qualitative approaches. Quantitatively, statistics reveal tangible information regarding women’s success (e.g., earnings equality). Qualitatively, the focus rests on the examination of ruling texts and female soldiers’ life experiences as a means to explicate current institutional practices and the culture of soldiering. Using this multi-method comparative approach, the story of women’s integration emerges as varied. Quantitative results show that Non-Commissioned Member (NCM) female soldiers succeed relatively well. Yet, to do soldiering work, women give up on having a family, whereas men can do both. Female soldiers in the Officer class face more challenges; they do not earn as much as their male colleagues, and unlike them, they also face difficulties in maintaining both military work and family life.

 There has been progress, but the military is a governmental body publically controlled, thus, findings reveal insufficient efforts for such an agency. Although the military ideology is underpinned by obedience to orders, the CF did not obey fully the order to integrate women. Given the lengthy delay since the commission, and the moral and legal pressure that followed (human rights decision, employment equity act), the achieved results are mediocre. Such findings do not bode well for women in companies and organisations that do not fall under the employment equity act.

La vie de soldat dans les Forces canadiennes: un point de vue sexospécifique!

Les femmes ont parcouru beaucoup de chemin depuis la Commission royale d’enquête sur le statut de la femme au Canada qui, en 1970, formulait 167 recommandations visant à corriger des inégalités et iniquités connues. De celles-ci, six portaient plus particulièrement sur l’intégration complète des femmes aux Forces canadiennes. En 1989, un tribunal canadien des droits de la personne ordonnait aux Forces canadiennes de procéder à l’intégration complète des femmes. L’élimination de ces barrières sexospécifiques représente une étape importante dans l'atteinte de l'égalité au sein de l’armée. Peu de nations peuvent se vanter en effet d’offrir aux femmes un accès libre à tous les métiers militaires. Il appert toutefois que les Forces ont peiné, voire échoué, à satisfaire aux exigences de ces politiques législatives (Davis, 1994; Chapstick, Farley, Wild et Parkes, 2005; O’Hara, 1998a, 1998b; Tanner, 1999). La présente étude examine la vie quotidienne de soldates canadiennes afin d’approfondir les questions liées au genre au sein des Forces canadiennes.

Une approche quantitative et qualitative a été privilégiée. D'un point de vue quantitatif, les statistiques fournissent des renseignements matériels sur les avancées réalisées par les femmes (p. ex., l’équité en matière d’emploi). D’un point de vue qualitatif, l’étude des textes des décisions et d’expériences vécues par des soldates permettent de mieux comprendre les pratiques institutionnelles et la culture de l’armée. L’approche comparative et multiméthode permet de dresser un portrait inégal de l’intégration des femmes. Les résultats quantitatifs montrent que les femmes militaires du rang réussissent relativement bien. Par contre, pour exercer leur métier de soldat, les femmes doivent renoncer à avoir une famille, un choix que les hommes n’ont pas à faire. Pour ce qui est des femmes sous-officières, les défis sont plus nombreux : elles gagnent moins que leurs collègues masculins et, contrairement à ceux-ci, éprouvent des difficultés à équilibrer activités militaires et vie de famille.

 


 Department of Psychology Information Sessions

Wednesday, Febuary 29th, 11:30-12:30 and 12:30- 1:30 in Keirstead 105.

Refreshments served.

 


 Getting to the Heart of the Matter: Emotionally Focused Therapy (EFT) for Couples

The Psychology department at UNB Fredericton is very pleased to announce that Dr. Paul Greenman of the Université du Québec en Outaouais,  Hôpital Montfort (Ottawa), and the Ottawa Couple and Family Institute will present a colloquium entitled, "Getting to the Heart of the Matter: Emotionally Focused Therapy (EFT) for Couples".  This should be a very exciting talk that is of interest to both clinicians and researchers.

The colloquium will take place on Friday, March 30, at 3:30 p.m. in Keirstead Hall's Snodgrass Lounge, Room 105. Refreshments will be served. All are welcome and encouraged to attend!

This presentation is for clinicians, researchers, and anyone else who is interested in learning more about how a growing number of psychologists currently understand adult love and how they help people improve the quality of their romantic relationships. Against the backdrop of attachment theory and its application to the domain of intimate relationships in adulthood, I will discuss the steps and stages of Emotionally Focused Therapy (EFT) for couples and summarize the results of a quarter century of research into its clinical efficacy, including some of my own work on the application of EFT to patients suffering from chronic medical illnesses. There will be a particular emphasis during the talk on the usefulness of EFT for treating problems such as depression and post-traumatic stress, which have traditionally been the sole province of individual psychotherapy. I will conclude with an analysis of the strengths and limitations of this approach.

 


 Mindfulness and the New Neurobiology

The Psychology department at UNB Fredericton is very pleased to announce that Dr. Bill Cook, a physician and bioethicist, will present a colloquium entitled, "Mindfulness and the New Neurobiology".  

The colloquium will take place on Friday, January 13th, 2012, at 3:30 p.m. in Keirstead Hall's Snodgrass Lounge, Room 105. Refreshments will be served. All are welcome and encouraged to attend!

Dr. Cook will provide an brief introduction to mindfulness and evidence for its benefits in one’s life and will review the neurobiological effects of mindfulness that help us understand why the benefits accrue.

BIO

William A. Cook graduated from Queen’s University Medical School, Kingston, Ontario, and completed his training in plastic surgery at Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia, becoming a Fellow of the Royal College of Surgeons of Canada. Dr. Cook’s interest in bioethics resulted in the development of a bioethics service at River Valley Health in New Brunswick where he practices and in the completion of a Ph.D. in bioethics from the University of New Brunswick in Fredericton. Dr. Cook practiced Plastic Surgery in Fredericton for 25 years and from 2005 –2009 was VP Medicine at River Valley Health. He continues to be active in the now Regional bioethics service and in his current MindBody Medicine practice with a central focus on mindfulness and conscious living.

 

 

 


2011


 

Implications of Early Executive Functions for Social Development

The Psychology department at UNB Fredericton is very pleased to announce that Dr. Nancy Garon from Mount Allison University will present a colloquium entitled, "Implications of Early Executive Functions for Social Development."  

The colloquium will take place on Friday, November 4 , at 3:30 p.m. in Keirstead Hall's Snodgrass Lounge, Room 105. Refreshments will be served. All are welcome and encouraged to attend!

  Executive functions are a set of higher order regulatory abilities that research shows are critically important for social development. Executive functions (EF) have been strongly linked to the children’s ability to control their own thoughts, emotions, and behaviour. Executive functions have effects on a variety of outcomes such as early school success, the development of empathy and conscience, and acceptance by peers. The talk will focus on a study designed to explore the early development of executive function in typical preschoolers (N = 267) and in a sample of young children with autism spectrum disorder (N = 32). Results indicate a specific pattern of EF development in typical children. Children with ASD showed a pattern of strength and weaknesses relative to mental-aged matched controls. While children with ASD had difficulty forming and shifting from a mental set, they did not differ from typical children in maintaining mental set once it was formed. Furthermore, the overall score on the executive battery was strongly associated with reported symptoms of autism on the Social Responsiveness Scale, suggesting a link between early executive functions and social problems in this population. The results of this study suggest that our preschool EF battery is a promising tool for assessing EF in young children with developmental disabilities.

 

 


 

Understanding the Relationship Between Stress and Sexual Function

The Psychology department at UNB Fredericton is very pleased to announce that Dr. Lisa Dawn Hamilton from Mount Allison University will present a colloquium entitled, "Understanding the relationship between stress and sexual function."  

The colloquium will take place on Friday, October 28, at 3:30 p.m. in Keirstead Hall's Snodgrass Lounge, Room 105. Refreshments will be served. All are welcome and encouraged to attend!

 In most species, stress is generally thought to be detrimental to reproductive (sexual) function. However, there is a limited body of research that indicates some stress can potentially be beneficial for sexual behavior. My research focuses on the physiological and psychological factors that underlie the relationship between stress and sexual functioning. In particular, I am interested in the mechanisms through which both acute and chronic stress may facilitate or inhibit sexual arousal and desire. Through a series of laboratory and survey-based studies with healthy participants (mostly women), my collaborators and I have found that acute stressors presented before visual sexual stimuli in the laboratory are beneficial for subsequent genital arousal in women, and that the sympathetic nervous system is the key mechanism facilitating arousal. Chronic stress, which is inherently more difficult to control experimentally, shows a more complicated relationship with both desire and arousal, but has an generally inhibitory effect that is driven by both increased cortisol and cognitive distraction. These studies demonstrate that acute and chronic stress affect sexual arousal in distinct ways and likely through separate mechanisms. Implications for future research and clinical applications will be discussed.

 

Copyright on Campus

The Psychology department at UNB Fredericton is very pleased to announce that Joshua Dickison and Linda Roulston will present a colloquium entitled "Copyright on Campus."  Josh is the copyright officer and Linda is a librarian (and liaison for the Psychology Department) with the Harriet Irving Library.

The colloquium will take place on Friday, September 9 , at 3:30 p.m. in Keirstead Hall's Snodgrass Lounge, Room 105. Refreshments will be served. All are welcome and encouraged to attend!
 
Copyright on Campus

Over the past year, institutions across Canada (excluding Quebec) have been forced seriously to evaluate copying practices on campus. The most significant change for UNB staff and students has been that UNB, along with most academic institutions, has decided to work outside of the Canadian copyright collective, Access Copyright (formerly CanCopy). As a result, much more attention is being paid to the copying that takes place in the classroom. Although a few rules have changed since the end of the Access Copyright License, the majority of rules that are now available from the UNB Policy and Guideline are based upon the Copyright Act. The changing ways in which instructors and students exchange ideas depends upon the rules that apply when using others' work. This session will focus primarily upon specific exceptions within the Copyright Act, such as Educational Exceptions, Fair Dealing and Library Exceptions. A representative from the Library will also be available for questions that relate to the licensed electronic resources that are available for teaching and research purposes outside of the Copyright limitations.

 


 Mood Disorder Diagnoses, Cognitive Biases and Self-Insight

The Psychology department at UNB Fredericton is very pleased to announce that Dr. Serife Tekin will present a colloquium entitled "Mood Disorder Diagnoses, Cognitive Biases and Self-Insight."  Dr. Tekin is a postdoctoral research fellow at NovelTechEthics in the Department of Bioethics at Dalhousie University.

The colloquium will take place on Friday, March 25th, at 3:30 p.m. in Keirstead Hall's Snodgrass Lounge, Room 105. Refreshments will be served. All are welcome and encouraged to attend!


Mood Disorder Diagnoses, Cognitive Biases and Self-Insight

This paper explores how the symptom-based descriptions of mood disorders, as laid out in the Diagnostic Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM), might influence patients’ self-insight defined here as their understanding of their identity, interpersonal relationships, symptoms, and the relationship between their symptoms and life processes. It is argued that, when (and if) incorporated into a patient’s self-understanding, working in conjunction with her cognitive biases, a symptom-based understanding of mood disorders might lead to impoverished self-insight. It might do so by directing patient’s attention to the symptoms of her illness, abstracted and isolated from their relational manifestations in the course of her life. An exploration of how a DSM diagnosis might influence self-insight – beyond its influence on the treatment of the patient’s disorder – is needed, because the DSM is used by clinicians, researchers, insurance companies and increasingly by patients themselves, even though the latter is not its intended use, thereby lending itself to what I call a culture of DSM diagnoses. The DSM, thus, organizes not only how patients’ mood disorders are therapeutically addressed but also how patients understand themselves and their interpersonal problems. Relevant worries are bolstered with an appeal to a patient’s memoir of psychopathology.

 


February 18th  at 1:30pm in Keirstead Hall’s Snodgrass Lounge, Room 105

 Noldus Information Technology develops, markets, and supports innovative software, instruments, integrated systems, and services for behavioral research. These solutions allow scientists and practitioners to enhance the quality of their data, to increase productivity, and to make optimal use of human or animal resources.Our solutions for behavioral research can be used in application areas ranging from developmental psychology and educational research to movement sciences and psychiatry.

 Join us on February 18th  at 1:30pm in Keirstead Hall’s Snodgrass Lounge, Room 105, where Peter Chen, Sales Engineer from Noldus, will be demonstrating The Observer XT and FaceReader, two key products for your behavioral research.

The Observer XT is the professional and user-friendly software tool for collection, analysis, and presentation of observational data. Whether you observe live or from video, The Observer XT offers you an accurate tool to study behavior. It’s easy to use and extremely accurate, replacing common paper-and-pencil methods.  In The Observer XT you can work without video and code live, but you can also use one or more video cameras to record the scene. Visualization of data creates a direct reference between the videos and coded events; simply watch the videos at the speed of your choice and see the events and comments. 

FaceReader is the unique software that automatically analyzes facial expressions. It recognizes the 6 basic emotions: happy, sad, angry, surprised, scared, and disgusted. Integrate, visualize, and analyze FaceReader data with other data modalities such as eye tracking or physiological data in The Observer XT.  FaceReader allows you to work off-line using video, on-line for live analysis using a USB camera, or upload still images for analysis.

Noldus Information Technology develops, markets, and supports innovative software, instruments, integrated systems, and services for behavioral research. These solutions allow scientists and practitioners to enhance the quality of their data, to increase productivity, and to make optimal use of human or animal resources.Our solutions for behavioral research can be used in application areas ranging from developmental psychology and educational research to movement sciences and psychiatry

 


 

 

Friday, February 18, at 3:30 p.m. in Keirstead Hall's Snodgrass Lounge, Room 105

The Psychology department at UNB Fredericton is very pleased to announce
that Dr. Mujgan Inozu will present a colloquium entitled "Why are Religious
Individuals more Obsessional and Scrupulous? A Comparison of Highly
Religious Turkish and Canadian Samples."  Dr. Inozu is a postdoctoral fellow
in the Department of Psychology at UNB Fredericton.

The colloquium will take place on Friday, February 18, at 3:30 p.m. in
Keirstead Hall's Snodgrass Lounge, Room 105. Refreshments will be served.
All are welcome and encouraged to attend!

Why are Religious Individuals more Obsessional and Scrupulous? A Comparison
of Highly Religious Turkish and Canadian Samples.

The literature has long contained speculation that some cultural values and
religiosity may increase the catastrophic interpretation of intrusive
thoughts and dysfunctional control beliefs; that is, it has been suggested
that these differences may increase the tendency for some individuals to
develop obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) and, specifically, scrupulosity.
To date, no published studies have compared OCD, obsessive related beliefs
and scrupulosity in high and low religious Muslim and Christian samples. In
the present study religious school students, as well as high and low
religious university students in Turkey and Canada, were compared on the
Penn Inventory of Scrupulosity (PIOS), and symptom measures of
obssesionality, obsessive beliefs and negative affect.  During this
presentation, the effect of religion and religiosity on the OCD symptoms,
beliefs and scrupulosity will be discussed in light of the findings of the
present study.

 

 


2010


Atlantic Cognitive Neuroscience Meeting

Friday November 19th

I'm very pleased to invite you to attend the talks that have been scheduled for Friday, November 19th. These talks are part of the Atlantic Cognitive Neuroscience Meeting, which is being hosted by the Department of Psychology at the University of New Brunswick Fredericton. The talks will be held in the Snodgrass Lounge (room 105) of Keirstead Hall. Refreshments will be served and all are encouraged to attend.

The schedule is as follows:

At 1:30 to 2:20 PM, Dr. Geneviève Desmarais, from the Department of Psychology at Mount Allison University, will deliver a talk entitled "A Little Bird Told Me…About the Nature of Object Representation in Memory." 

At 2:30 to 3:20 PM, Dr. Eric Richards, from the Department of Psychology at the University of Prince Edward Island, will deliver a talk entitled "Detecting Changes and Changing your Detecting: The Effects of Learning and Practice."                                                     

Finally, at 3:30 to 4:20 PM, Dr. Chris Oriet, from the Department of Psychology at the University of Regina, will deliver a talk entitled "Representing the Unseen Set."

Also, please see the poster regarding this afternoon of talks. Hope to see you there!



Available Tenure-track Assistant Professor position beginning July 2011

Tenure Track Position.

 


Upcoming Events - Fall 2010

Friday September 24th at 3:30 PM, Dr. José F. Domene will present a talk entitled "Work, Location, and Relationship: Young Adult Couples' Goals and Actions in Planning a Future Life Together."

Friday October 22nd at 3:30 PM, Mr. Andy Scott will speak to us about the New Brunswick Social Policy Research Network. Additional information will soon follow.

Friday November 19th, we will have a series of talks as part of the Atlantic Cognitive Neuroscience Meeting. Speakers and additional information will follow later in the term.

 



Encaenia Prize Ceremony  - May 2010

Awards

Dean's Scholars:

 



Ann Cameron On Wednesday, June 16, 2010 at 2:30 pm in the Snodgrass Lounge, Dr. Catherine Ann Cameron will present a colloquium entitled "International Perspectives on Early Childhood Research: A Day in the Life." 

Dr. Cameron will discuss her latest collaboratively edited book that presents an innovative approach to investigating early childhood and human culture more generally.  The Day in the Life project studied young children and their families in seven different countries worldwide.  The findings of the international, multidisciplinary team are synthesised here in a collaboratively authored study.  Different paths to thriving are illustrated through words and images as the authors capture interactions of the girls with their environments, including caregivers.  Embodiment, sound, movement and language are all considered in the light of a dynamic approach to multimodal research.  The result is a fascinating new contribution to studies of human culture, demonstrating how the children learn an enormous amount about the environments in which they live, transforming their own understanding and family life in the course of their activities.  Chapter topics include investigations of using video data, emotional security, musicality, eating events, symbol systems, and humour. The book will be of interest to all those engaged in research and practice concerned with resilience in early childhood, families and the development of multimodal, participatory research methods.



Larry Award

The winner of this year's Dr. Joseph Byrne Award for Excellence in Clinical Psychology is Dr. Larry Heinlein.

The winner of this year's Dr. Joseph Byrne Award for Excellence in Clinical Psychology is Dr. Larry Heinlein. Dr. Heinlein works in Fredericton, New Brunswick. He has been working as a Psychologist for more than 30 years. His private practice offers a broad range of assessment, intervention and consultation services to children, youth and their families. The main focus of his practice is evaluations of young offenders and he is an expert witness in the New Brunswick court system. Dr. Heinlein has supervised many Ph.D. students from UNB for licensure and practica.

Dr. Heinlein was nominated for this award by both fellow Psychologists and students. One of the Psychologists who nominated Dr. Heinlein noted that "he has a gift when it comes to conducting assessments", reporting that he had learned more about assessment from Dr. Heinlein than he did in his entire graduate school career and his residency combined. The nominators also noted that Dr. Heinlein is "highly committed" and has clinical skills which are, "second to none". Dr. Heinlein's supervision skills were also praised. In fact, the clinical faculty and students at UNB have already voted to recognize Dr. Heinlein with the UNB Certificate of Recognition. Overall, it is for his work with children and families and his training of future Psychologists across the country that we are pleased and honored to present this award to Dr. Heinlein.

 

 


2009



Announcement

On February 11th and 15th, Linda Roulston - the Psychology Liaison ibrarian, will be instructing two "Introduction to Psychology Resources" library sessions. The sessions are free of charge and interested participants may register online at: http://www.unb.ca/ctd/courses.cgi

Dates and Times:     Thurs, Feb 11, Time:10:00 / 10:50am
                              Mon, Feb 15, Time: 2:30 / 3:20pm

Location:     Harriet Irving Library, Learning Lab (HIL Room 112)

Description: Are you taking an undergraduate Psychology course and need to learn which online Psychology resources are available to you? Are you confused by how to narrow your search and quickly find the books, journals, and dissertations you need? If so, then this session is for you! This introductory session will focus on the library's Psychology Subject Guide, key Psychology reference sources, and how to use PsycINFO more effectively.

Audience: Intended for undergraduate students.

 


Sleigh RideSandi & Larry's Sleigh Ride

February 8, 2009. Thanks to Sandi & Larry for hosting such a wonderful event!