Research

Research and teaching is the core mandate of the Department of Political Science.  Each member of the Department maintains an active research agenda and, very often, this research appears in their lectures and seminars.  Indeed, the Department believes that active researchers make better teachers and, to this end, deliberately supports its faculty members and its graduate students in their research.

For example, Carolyn Bassett recently received a $57 000 Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council Standard Research Grant to study labour in South Africa and its participation in policy making.  Dr. Bassett’s research forms an important part of her teaching in both Political Science and International Development Studies.

Trained as a political theorist, David Bedford’s current research focus is the ancient Greek historian Thucydides. Dr. Bedford also maintains a research agenda in Aboriginal self-government.  In addition to teaching the core course in political theory, Dr. Bedford teaches Aboriginal politics and has supervised a number of theses on Aboriginal self-government and politics.

Paul Howe is one of this country’s leading scholars on the question of democratic disengagement and electoral reform.  Indeed, he has a monograph on this very topic forthcoming from UBC Press.  Dr. Howe’s research interests are reflected in the courses that he teaches on the democratic deficit and on quantitative approaches to the study of politics.

Thom Workman maintains a number of research interests, including political thought, political economy, and music.  His most recent book, If You’re in My Way, I’m Walking: The Assault on Working People Since 1970, studies the rollback of the welfare state, the stagnation of real wages, and the assault on unions and the labour movement.  Dr. Workman’s eclectic research interests are reflected in the courses that he teaches on capitalism in Canada and on political critique in literature.

With the support of a $31 000 Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council Standard Research Grant, Joanne Wright is studying women and war through the writings of Margaret Cavendish and Virginia Woolf.  As well, she maintains an ongoing scholarly interest in feminist political thought and the Second Wave feminist movement.  Dr. Wright teaches courses in Political Science and Women’s Studies on women and politics, feminist theory, and law and politics.

Donald Wright is broadly interested in political and intellectual history.  He is currently writing a biography of the historian Donald Creighton.  His courses in Canadian politics and in American politics take a historical perspective.  He also teaches Canadian historiography in the Department of History.