Wendy D. ChurchillFemale Patients

Dr. Wendy D. Churchill (Early Modern Britain and its Empire; Social History of Medicine; Early Modern Atlantic World; Women's and Gender History) received her Ph.D. in History from McMaster University in 2005. During 2005-06, she held a Hannah Postdoctoral Fellowship (Associated Medical Services, Inc.) at the Wellcome Trust Centre for the History of Medicine at University College London (UCL). She began teaching in the Department of History at the University of New Brunswick, Fredericton in 2006 and is now an Associate Professor. She was the recipient of a UNB Merit Award for 2012-13.

Her research and publications in the social history of medicine have focussed on the themes of gender, race, and class in the context of early modern Britain and its empire. She has published articles in The Journal of Imperial and Commonwealth History (2012), Social History of Medicine (2005), Journal of the History of Medicine and Allied Sciences (2005), and Vesalius (2001). She has also published chapters in the following edited collections: From Books to Bezoars: Sir Hans Sloane and his Collections, eds. Alison Walker, Arthur MacGregor, and Michael Hunter (2012); Ireland and Medicine in the Seventeenth and Eighteenth Centuries, eds. James Kelly and Fiona Clarke (2010). Her first monograph, Female Patients in Early Modern Britain: Gender, Diagnosis, and Treatment (2012) was published by Ashgate within its The History of Medicine in Context Series.

Her current research project explores how medical conduct functioned within multiple contexts and settings by examining the influence of professional, social, and moral codes on patient-practitioner relationships in Britain and its empire from the seventeenth through early nineteenth centuries. It has received funding from Associated Medical Services Inc., the University of New Brunswick, the McCain Foundation, and the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada (SSHRC). She is in the process of drafting her second monograph manuscript arising out of this research.

Teaching (courses/supervision):

Dr. Churchill teaches various courses and offers graduate supervision in the following areas: early modern Britain and its empire; social history of medicine; early modern Atlantic World; women's and gender history. She is teaching History 1009, 3216, 3226 , 4003 and 5103 this Academic year 2016/17.  In 2017/18 she will be teaching 3226 and 4247 in Fall term.

She has been previously nominated for the Allan P. Stuart Award for Excellence in Teaching and short-listed for the Arts Faculty Award for Excellence in Teaching (full-time instructor category). In 2012, she received the University of New Brunswick Student Union Teaching Excellence Award.

http://www.unb.ca/fredericton/cetl/teaching_excellence/award_winners/index.html

http://www.unb.ca/fredericton/cetl/_resources/pdf/celebrating-web-2012.pdf

Publications:

•           Female Patients in Early Modern Britain: Gender, Diagnosis, and Treatment, Series: The History of Medicine in Context (Farnham, Surrey, England and Burlington, VT, USA: Ashgate Publishing, December 2012), 298 pp. ISBN: 978-1-4094-3877-9 (hardcover); ISBN 978-1-4094-3878-6 (ebook PDF); ISBN 978-1-4094-7113-4 (ebook ePUB).

•           “Sloane’s Perspectives on the Medical Knowledge and Health Practices of Non-Europeans,” in Alison Walker, Arthur MacGregor, and Michael Hunter, eds., From Books to Bezoars: Sir Hans Sloane and his Collections (London: The British Library, 2012), 90-98 and 266-69. ISBN: 978-0-7123-5880-4.

•           “Efficient, Efficacious, and Humane Responses to Non-European Bodies in British Military Medicine, 1780-1815,” The Journal of Imperial and Commonwealth History 40, 2 (August 2012): 137-158.

•           “Gendered Medical Advice within Anglo-Irish Correspondence: A Case Study of the Cary-Jurin Letters,” in James Kelly and Fiona Clarke, eds., Ireland and Medicine in the Seventeenth and Eighteenth Centuries, The History of Medicine in Context (Farnham, Surrey, England and Burlington, VT, USA: Ashgate Publishing, 2010), Chapter 7, 163-82.

•           Review of Louise Hill Curth, English Almanacs, Astrology and Popular Medicine, 1550–1700 (Manchester University Press, 2007) in Medical History 53, 3 (July 2009): 450-51.

•           “The Medical Practice of the Sexed Body: Women, Men, and Disease in Britain, circa 1600–1740,” Social History of Medicine 18, 1 (April 2005): 3-22.

•           “Bodily Differences? Gender, Race and Class in Hans Sloane’s Jamaican Medical Practice, 1687–1688,” Journal of the History of Medicine and Allied Sciences 60, 4 (October 2005): 391-444.

•           with J.D. Alsop, “The Prescribing Physicians and Sick Scholars of Oxford: Jeremiah Webbe’s Apothecarial Notebook, 1653–54,” Vesalius: Official Journal of the International Society for the History of Medicine 7, 2 (December 2001): 73-77.

 Recent refereed conference presentations (2007-2013):

•           “Cultures of Masculinities in British Military Medicine, circa 1760-1820,” North American Conference on British Studies (NACBS), Montreal, November 10, 2012.

•           “The Right to Care: Military Men and British Imperial Medicine, 1780–1820.” 80th Anglo-American Conference of Historians: Health in History. Institute of Historical Research, London, U.K., June 29, 2011.

•           “The Medical Rights of Military Men in the British Empire, 1780–1820.” The annual meeting of the Canadian Society for the History of Medicine, UNB and St. Thomas University. Fredericton, NB. May 30, 2011.

•           “Hans Sloane’s Perspectives on the Medical Knowledge and Health Practices of Non-Europeans.” From Books to Bezoars: An international conference celebrating the 350th anniversary of the birth of Sir Hans Sloane, physician, naturalist and collector. The British Library, London, U.K. June 7, 2010.

•           “The Gendered Nature of Patient Consent within Early Modern British Medicine.” The annual meeting of the American Association for the History of Medicine. Montreal, Quebec. May 6, 2007.

Recent invited conference, symposium, and colloquium papers (2007-2013):

•           “Cultures of Masculinities in British Military Medicine, circa 1760–1820.” Network for the Study of Civilians, Soldiers, and Society (NSCSS), UNB and STU, Fredericton. March 15, 2013.

•          “The Rights of Military Men in Late Eighteenth- and Early Nineteenth-Century British Imperial Medicine.” History of Health/Medicine/Science/Technology Discussion Group, UNB and STU, Fredericton. January 19, 2012.

•           “Responses to Non-European Bodies in British Military Medicine during the Long Eighteenth Century.” Tri-Campus Colloquium (TCC) of History Departments at St. Thomas University and University of New Brunswick (Fredericton and Saint John). St. Thomas University, Fredericton, New Brunswick, March 25, 2010.

•           “Responses to Non-European Bodies in British Military Medicine during the Long Eighteenth Century.” British Asia-British Atlantic Network’s Conference on Early Modern Imperial-Indigenous Military Conflict and Cooperation. Co-sponsored by the Gorsebrook Research Institute for Atlantic Canada Studies (Saint Mary’s University) and Milton F. Gregg Centre for the Study of War and Society (UNB, Fredericton), with additional funding from SSHRC. UNB, Fredericton, New Brunswick. August 14, 2009.

•           “Gendered Medical Advice within Anglo-Irish Correspondence during the Eighteenth Century: the Cary-Jurin Case Study.” Symposium on Ireland and Medicine in the Seventeenth and Eighteenth Centuries. Centre for Eighteenth-Century Studies at Queen’s University Belfast, Belfast, Northern Ireland. April 26, 2008.

Contact Information:

Wendy D. Churchill

Office: Tilley Hall 133

Phone: (506) 447-3118