Sarah Glassford

Dr. Sarah Glassford, BA Hons., MA (Western Ontario), PhD (York) is an award-winning teacher and scholar of post-Confederation Canadain social history.  She followed her doctorate with a SSHRC postdoctoral fellowship at the University of Ottawa's Nursing History Research Unit, and has subsequently taught at the University of Ottawa (where her work was recognized with a Faculty of Arts Distinguished Teaching Award), Carleton University, and the University of Prince Edward Island.  She is pleased to join the UNB History Department for the 2015-16 academic year.

Her teaching reflects her research interests, embracing the broad sweep of Canadian history but particularly focussed on 19th and 20th century social and cultural history, war and society, women's history, children's history, the history of medicine, and the work of voluntary and humanitarian organizations in Canada and abroad.  In the classroom, Dr. Glassford blends traditional methods (reading, writing, discussion, lecture) with creative and interactive approaches (small groups, simulations, non-traditional assignments), with a consistent emphasis on developing students' critical thinking skills and showing that Canadian history is NOT boring! Student evaluations consistently note her enthusiasm, organization, creativity, and approachability.

Dr. Glassford's published work includes the edited collection A Sisterhood of Suffering and Service: Women and Girls of Canada and Newfoundland during the First World War (UBC Press, 2012), the 2009 Hilda Neatby prize-winning article "'The Greatest Mother of Them All': Carework and the Discourse of Mothering in the Canadian Red Cross Society during the First World War" in thJournal of the History of the Association for Research on Mothering, and 2014's "Practical Patriotism: How the Canadian Junior Red Cross and Its Child Members Met the Challenge of the Second World War," in the Journal of the History of Childhood and Youth.  Her doctoral and postdoctoral research is presently being peer reviewed by McGill-Queen's University Press under the title "From Battlefields to Blood: The Canadian Red Cross Society, 1885-1970," and her current research looks at the voluntary work of rural PEI women during the First World War.  Dr. Glassford loves literature as much as she loves history, and tries to combine the two when she can, for instance in her forthcoming article on the depiction of women's First World War voluntary work and in L.M. Montgomery's Rilla of Ingleside, and her historical fiction short story "At War" in the forthcoming Island Holiday Reader (Acord Press, 2015).

Sarah Glassford